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THEY STRUGGLED IN PANIC

From age as young as five they were sent down the mine. The darkness struck terror but they dare not complain. In the dust, grit and wet of that black evil place they grub around in filth to work at the coalface. If a new seam was cut the air became toxic. They coughed and they choked and struggled in panic. When the coalface collapsed, alive they were buried. Some were never dug out but just left there as dead. When a child died like that, parents offered some pence, which the coalmine owner thought was fair recompense. In that meanest mine-shaft, with each child a cheap slave there were many young deaths and the pit was their grave.

Copyright © | Year Posted 2016




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Date: 2/12/2016 3:32:00 AM
It just reminds us, something we are all trying to forget, but it's still happening, gold mines in Africa, and they are fetching slavery back to England, xx xx good work, real life
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Tony Hargreaves
Date: 2/20/2016 3:30:00 AM
Hello Wendy, Thanks for comment. Child labour here in Yorkshire was shocking. Apart from child miners we should perhaps spare a thought for the children as young as four who were forced up chimneys to sweep the soot. TH x