Get Your Premium Membership

Ant Lion Poems

Note: The forms for these poems were selected by the poet. Often poems are assigned the wrong form. Please confirm the accuracy of the poetic form before referencing the poem.



List of New Poems

PMPoem TitlePoetFormFormCategories  
My Favorite Bugs Charles Sides Quatrain Quatrain ant lion, nature, fun,

About This Page

Above are examples of poems about ant lion. This list of poems is composed of the works of modern international poet members of PoetrySoup. Read short, long, best, famous, and modern examples of ant lion poetry. This list of works is an excellent resource for examples of these types of poems.

Ant Lion Poem Example

My Favorite Bugs

There was no TV, cell phones or I-Pods When I was a very young lad You found ways to entertain yourself No longer the case and it’s sad Aside from spiders, butterflies and bees Four others were favorite bugs They provided many hours of fun But I never did play with slugs The pill bugs could be fascinating When touched, they coil up in a ball They had amour plates over their backs And hundreds of legs used to crawl You will find them under rocks and wood They like it to be slightly damp When you will find there’s both big and small Living together in a camp A fire-fly is a big favorite He is known by different names Such as a glow bug or lightening bug Call it what you want, it’s the same We’d smear the glowing stuff from his tail Write out initials on our hand Half of the fun was in catching them Just seeing them glow’s really grand The ant lion is such an awesome thing Also known as an doodle bug They make little creators in the sand And never let their hole get plugged If an ant walks in the crater Chances are he’ll never get out The doodle bug flips sand up on him Then pulls him under he’s so stout A good way to catch a doodle bug Trickle sand down to the bottom When he start flipping sand from his hole He’s near, so grab and you got’um The last one of my favorite bugs, A jack worm is what I call him He lives at the bottom of a hole That’s 6 inches deep and quite slim I liked to drop a straw down his hole Before long he’ll push till it’s out His body is soft and one inch long With some hard pinchers for a snout One way I know to catch a jack worm Let him push the straw with his snout That’s when the straw is in his pinchers Now just jerk real fast and he’s out Kids now days don’t know what they’re missing Letting some device entertain They could be having fun on their own Go back to the days of Mark Twain

Poem Copyright ©