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Poetry and Literature News

Enjoy the latest poetry news from poets, writers, and news sources from around the world. Each day, PoetrySoup provides this timely poetry news which is continually updated from poetry news sources around the net.

Wed,07 Oct 2020
Poetry & Literature: News & Events: Celebrate Hispanic Heritage Month with Two Educator Events on 10/8 and 10/15

The PALABRA Archive

Thursday, October 8, 4:00 PM ET
Celebrate Hispanic Heritage Month with the Library of Congress and the PALABRA Archive

Join us for a demonstration of the PALABRA Archive (formerly know as the Archive of Hispanic Literature on Tape) led by Catalina Gómez, reference librarian in the Hispanic Division at the Library of Congress. This resource dates back to 1943 and contains nearly 800 recordings of poets and prose writers participating in sessions at the Library's Recording Laboratory and at other locations around Spain, Portugal, Latin America, and the United States. To date, writers from 32 countries are represented in this collection, which includes readings in Spanish, Portuguese, Catalan, French, Náhuatl, Mayan, Zapotec, Aymara, English, and Dutch. This webinar is free and open to educators. Registration is required. Co-sponsored by the Library’s Learning and Innovation Office and Hispanic Division, and presented in partnership with the National Council of Teachers of English (NCTE).

Location: Online only—this webinar will be hosted via Zoom; registration required
Contact: poetry@loc.gov

 

Juan Felipe Herrera

Thursday, October 15, 4:00 PM ET
Special Event with Poet Laureate Juan Felipe Herrera

Part II of our National Hispanic Heritage Month celebration will feature an intimate conversation with former U.S. Poet Laureate Juan Felipe Herrera, who will unpack one of his poems recorded for the PALABRA Archive and provide insight into his writing process. He will also discuss poets in the archive who have influenced him, and participants will have the opportunity to ask Herrera questions. This webinar is free and open to educators. Registration is required. Co-sponsored by the Library’s Learning and Innovation Office and Hispanic Division, and presented in partnership with the National Council of Teachers of English (NCTE).

Location: Online only—this webinar will be hosted via Zoom; registration required
Contact: poetry@loc.gov

Fri,18 Sep 2020
Virtual National Book Festival Sept. 25-27 – Register Now!

Banner graphic promoting the 2020 National Book Festival

2020 Library of Congress National Book Festival: Celebrating American Ingenuity

The 2020 Library of Congress National Book Festival will celebrate its 20th birthday this year! And, for the first time in its history, the event will be completely virtual. Join us next weekend for an interactive, online celebration of American Ingenuity featuring more than 120 authors, poets and illustrators. The festivities will culminate with a PBS television special “The Library of Congress National Book Festival: Celebrating American Ingenuity,” hosted by Hoda Kotb on Sunday, Sept. 27, 6-8 p.m. ET/PT (check local listings).

Register Today! 

Create your FREE account now at loc.gov/bookfest to access on-demand videos, live author chats and discussions during the Festival weekend, Sept. 25 – 27. You’ll have options to personalize your own festival journey with timely topics, and to explore book buying possibilities through the festival’s official bookseller, Politics & Prose.


Check Out the Author Lineup

Collage image of authors participating in the 2020 National Book Festival

More than 120 renowned authors, poets and illustrators are taking part in our virtual festival! Connect with your favorite writers across all genres at our virtual “stages” including, Children, Teens, Family, Food & Field, Fiction, Genre Fiction, History & Biography sponsored by Wells Fargo, Poetry & Prose sponsored by National Endowment for the Arts, Science and Understanding Our World.

View the full author lineup: loc.gov/events/2020-national-book-festival/authors/


Explore Timely Topics

New to this year’s festival is an opportunity to take a deeper dive into timely topics engaged by many books across the festival’s stages. You are invited to follow three newsworthy threads that weave through the festival and offer a more profound appreciation for the subjects. They are:

• “Fearless Women” – books by and about strong women and trailblazers.
• “Hearing Black Voices” – books that showcase Black voices across all genres, affirming their contributions to American culture.
• “Democracy in the 21st Century” – books that assess the state of democratic principles in America and around the globe.


Friday, Sept. 25: A Day of Programming for Schools, Children & Teens at Home

Children listening to a story at a past National Book Festival

The Library of Congress National Book Festival will present a robust lineup of live and recorded programming featuring all-star authors for schools and young audiences at home on Friday, Sept. 25. Video interviews with popular authors of books for children and young adults, as well as two 1-hour video specials, will be available for on-demand viewing starting at 9 a.m. ET on the festival website at loc.gov/bookfest and on the Library’s YouTube channel at youtube.com/user/LibraryOfCongress.

Young people can also check out the Roadmap to Reading, which features a list of “Great Reads from Great Places” – 53 books that reflect the literary heritage of the 50 states, the District of Columbia, Puerto Rico and the U.S. Virgin Islands.

Read more: loc.gov/item/prn-20-061/


Help Spread the Word

Promotional badge for the 2020 National Book Festival

Forward this email to your friends and family and encourage them to “meet” you at the festival. Follow our social media accounts, re-post festival info, and share your own posts about the event and your favorite presenting authors using the hashtag #NatBookFest. We’ve even created a fun Facebook frame for your profile picture to let friends know you’ll be there! (While logged into Facebook, select your profile picture > select Add Frame > search for National Book Festival Badge  2020 > select then save).


Thank you to our National Book Festival Supporters

The festival is free to the public with support from our sponsors and donors including National Book Festival Co-Chair, David M. Rubenstein, Charter Sponsor, The Washington Post, Patrons, Institute of Museum and Library Services, National Endowment for the Arts, Wells Fargo, Women's Suffrage Centennial Commission, and many Friends and Media Partners. The full list can be found at loc.gov/events/2020-national-book-festival/sponsors/.

Please join us in thanking all of our supporters and consider making your gift to the Library of Congress at loc.gov/donate.

Spread the joy of reading click-through banner to support the Library of Congress

 

Wed,05 Aug 2020
August News from the Librarian of Congress

Carla D. Hayden, Librarian of Congress

Friends,

What an eventful summer this has been. I hope that you are staying well as we begin another month in a most unusual year.

As August begins, all Library of Congress buildings and facilities remain closed to the public until further notice. You can continue to check the latest information regarding our COVID-19 response at this website.

Even so, the work of the Library continues, as we bring more public programming online, continue the work of digitizing more collections to make them available outside of the Library’s walls, and explore new ways to celebrate milestones in the history of the Library and of this nation virtually.

In that spirit, we will host our signature event, the annual Library of Congress National Book Festival, virtually this year. I hope you will join us to celebrate “American Ingenuity” with more than 120 renowned writers, poets and artists in an interactive, online experience for this 20th year of the festival. Save the date! It will take place September 25-27.

Today, we are also virtually celebrating the 150th anniversary of the U.S. Copyright Office with an event at noon ET. Make sure you register now for this free event.

August also marks 100 years since the passage of the 19th Amendment to the U.S. Constitution, which granted women the right to vote. Our current exhibition “Shall Not Be Denied: Women Fight for the Vote” is available online and is an excellent resource to discover more about the long fight for women’s suffrage. We are also joining forces with the Smithsonian and National Archives to present the #19SuffrageStories social media campaign and shed light on the stories of suffragists, including women of color, who have traditionally been overlooked.

Read more about these events, the campaign, and a few new online collections below.

Sincerely,
Carla Hayden, Librarian of Congress


Copyright event image

TODAY: Copyright Office Presents: 150 Years of Celebrating Creativity

On July 8, 2020, the U.S. Copyright Office of the Library of Congress turned 150 years old. Copyright Office history reflects the United States’ creative and technical innovations, important judicial rulings, and diplomatic treaties.

Today, August 4 at noon ET join the online event, “Copyright Office Presents: 150 Years of Celebrating Creativity” to hear from three engaging Copyright Office experts, and to explore how the role of the Office and its operations changed along with the law itself.

This online event is free, but registration is required: copyright.gov/events/


Suffrage Campaign Image

#19SuffrageStories

Women fought long and hard for the vote—before and after the passage of the 19th Amendment, which declares the right to vote “shall not be denied … on account of sex.” Diverse communities and organizations blazed the trail for equal voting rights across the nation. For many women, especially women of color, the fight didn’t end when the 19th Amendment went into effect on August 26, 1920. Yet the stories of these suffragists have often been overlooked.

Tune in on Instagram and Twitter to learn 19 stories you may not know from the Library of Congress, Smithsonian and National Archives. Every weekday from August 3 through Women’s Equality Day, August 26, we’re counting down from 19 to 1 with a new story each day on our Instagram and Twitter feeds.

Learn More: blogs.loc.gov/loc/2020/08/counting-down-with-19suffrage-stories-100th-anniversary-of-the-19th-amendment/


2020 National Book Festival PosterThe Library of Congress National Book Festival is Going Virtual – Save the Date!

The 20th annual Library of Congress National Book Festival will be held online Sept. 25-27. The festival will connect with audiences across the country for an interactive, online celebration of “American Ingenuity” featuring new books by more than 120 of the nation’s most-renowned writers, poets and artists.

Virtual stages will offer on-demand videos, live author chats and discussions, options to personalize your own journey through the festival with particular themes, and book buying possibilities through the festival’s official bookseller, Politics & Prose, with a limited number of commemorative book plates signed by authors.

Check out the full author lineup and download the new festival poster today!

Festival website: loc.gov/bookfest

Latest festival press release: loc.gov/item/prn-20-048/


Images from

Historic Public Affairs Series "Black Journal" Now Available Online

A collection of episodes from “Black Journal,” the first nationally televised public affairs program produced for, about, and by Black Americans has been released by The American Archive of Public Broadcasting (AAPB), a collaboration between WGBH and the Library of Congress. Largely unseen since they aired between 1968 and 1977, the 59 episodes have been digitized from archival tape in the Library’s collection and are now available to stream for free online. Accompanying the “Black Journal” episodes is a collection of essays that explore the public television programs that put Black issues and Black perspectives at the forefront in the wake of the civil rights movement.

Read the announcement: loc.gov/item/prn-20-047/


Images of William Howard Taft

William Howard Taft Papers Collection Now Available Online

The papers of William Howard Taft (1857-1930), twenty-seventh president of the United States and tenth chief justice of the U.S. Supreme Court, consist of approximately 676,000 documents (785,977 images), which have been digitized from 658 reels of previously reproduced microfilm. Held in the Library of Congress Manuscript Division, these papers constitute the largest collection of original Taft documents in the world. The collection contains family papers, personal and official correspondence, presidential and judicial files, speeches and addresses, legal files and notebooks, business and estate papers, engagement calendars, guest lists, scrapbooks, clippings, printed matter, memorabilia, and photographs dating from 1784 to 1973, with the bulk of the material dated 1880-1930.

View collection: loc.gov/collections/william-howard-taft-papers/about-this-collection/


Library of Congress

Support the Library

We are more grateful than ever for all that you do to keep us strong. Whether you support the Library with a gift or simply by spreading the word about what we do, you help us in our mission to connect millions of people around the world with the stories of our collective past, present, and future.

If you haven't yet had a chance to give and you're in a position to donate, please consider making a gift at loc.gov/donate/.

 

Thu,02 Jul 2020
Celebrating Independence Day

Carla D. Hayden, Librarian of Congress

Friends,

I hope that you are doing well. As we enter into July, it is hard to believe the many changes and challenges we’ve had to face in our world in just the past few months. The upcoming July 4th holiday is another reminder of the ways we’ve all had to adjust and rework communal celebrations and gatherings in the age of COVID-19.

Many of you have celebrated birthdays and graduations virtually, and have come up with creative ways to stay in touch with family and friends from a distance. The Library of Congress is no different, and we continue to adapt to stay connected with you even as our doors remain closed. This is especially important as we strive to offer a safe place to have difficult conversations about the challenges facing our nation today with regard to race, inequality and social justice.

To that end, below you will find information on some of our upcoming virtual events including today’s conversation with new Kluge Prize winner, Danielle Allen, who will take on the hard questions about democracy and public life. Our online series, “Hear You, Hear Me”: Conversations on Race in America, also continues this month.

You can also learn more about the major collections work we are undertaking to document the pandemic in an informative new blog post, “How Will We Remember COVID-19?”

And, as we prepare to celebrate Independence Day, it must be noted that the Library of Congress is home to the original rough draft of the Declaration of Independence. It is one of the institution’s top treasures. View it online here, https://www.loc.gov/exhibits/treasures/tr00.html, and discover other resources related to our nation’s independence below.

Have a safe holiday weekend.

Sincerely,
Carla Hayden, Librarian of Congress


Image of the signing of the Declaration of Independence

[Detail] Currier & Ives print showing the signing of the Declaration of Independence.
loc.gov/resource/pga.08583/

Independence Day

American Treasures of the Library of Congress: Declaration of Independence
loc.gov/exhibits/treasures/tr00.html

Declaration of Independence: Primary Documents in American History
guides.loc.gov/declaration-of-independence

American Revolution: A Resource Guide
guides.loc.gov/american-revolution

Thomas Jefferson Papers Collection
loc.gov/collections/thomas-jefferson-papers/about-this-collection/


Information on Danielle Allen event

TODAY: Kluge Prize Winner Danielle Allen

Librarian of Congress Carla Hayden announced last week that Danielle Allen, director of the Edmond J. Safra Center for Ethics and the James Bryant Conant University Professor at Harvard University, will receive the 2020 John W. Kluge Prize for Achievement in the Study of Humanity. Allen will work with the Library to share her expertise on justice, citizenship and democracy with a wide audience.

Today at 7 p.m. ET join Allen and Kluge Center Director John Haskell for a virtual event: “Danielle Allen Takes on the Hard Questions about Democracy and Public Life.” This presentation will premiere with closed captions on both the Library's Facebook page and the Library's YouTube site and be available afterwards on the Library's video page.

Kluge Prize Announcement: loc.gov/item/prn-20-043/


Homegrown Artists

Homegrown at Home Concert Series

The American Folklife Center at the Library of Congress is presenting traditional music and dance from a variety of folk cultures thriving in the United States and around the world in a new online concert series each Wednesday through September. Tune in to “Homegrown at Home” Wednesdays at noon ET on the American Folklife Center Facebook page, and replay performances anytime on the Library of Congress YouTube channel and on the Library's video page.

Series info & schedule: loc.gov/item/prn-20-045/


"Hear You, Hear Me": Conversations on Race in America

This online series continues featuring Librarian of Congress Carla Hayden in conversation with some of the nation’s great literary figures, and will highlight what poetry and literature can offer the nation as it contends with foundational issues of social justice.

  • Joy Harjo and Tracy K. Smith - Thursday, July 9, 2020, 7-8 p.m. ET
  • Colson Whitehead - Thursday, July 16, 2020, 7-8 p.m. ET

Event details & videos: loc.gov/programs/national-book-festival/national-book-festival-presents/


Remembering COVID

[Detail] Life during the pandemic. Photo: Camilo Vergara. Prints and Photographs Division.

How Will We Remember COVID-19?

The Library is amassing a vast collection of materials that document the COVID-19 pandemic, including the award-winning photography of Camilo Vergara. These photographs are among the very first items the Library acquired documenting the COVID-19 coronavirus pandemic. And they will be far from the last: The Library anticipates a collecting effort that exceeds its coverage of the Sept. 11, 2001, terrorist attacks — which was huge.

Read the full blog post: blogs.loc.gov/loc/2020/06/how-will-we-remember-covid-19/


Library of Congress

Support the Library

We are more grateful than ever for all that you do to keep us strong. Whether you support the Library with a gift or simply by spreading the word about what we do, you help us in our mission to connect millions of people around the world with the stories of our collective past, present, and future.

If you haven't yet had a chance to give and you're in a position to donate, please consider making a gift at loc.gov/donate/.

 

Fri,19 Jun 2020
Poetry & Literature: News & Events: NEW "HEAR YOU, HEAR" ME VIRTUAL PROGRAM SERIES LAUNCHES TODAY

Race in America: Jason Reynolds and Jacqueline Woodson

Friday, June 19, 4:00 PM
RACE IN AMERICA: JASON REYNOLDS AND JACQUELINE WOODSON

To commemorate Juneteenth, the holiday marking the end of slavery, Librarian of Congress Carla Hayden will chat with current National Ambassador for Young People’s Literature Jason Reynolds and former National Ambassador Jacqueline Woodson about ways to hear and support kids during a period of nationwide protest against injustice. Presented in partnership with National Book Festival Presents.

Location: Online only—this event will premiere with closed captions on both the Library's Facebook page and its YouTube site, and will be archived as a webcast on the Library’s website.

Contact: specialevents@loc.gov

 

Race in America: Joy Harjo and Tracy K. Smith

Thursday, July 9, 7:00 PM
RACE IN AMERICA: JOY HARJO AND TRACY K. SMITH

Librarian of Congress Carla Hayden will talk with her U.S. Poets Laureate appointees, Tracy K. Smith (2017-2019) and Joy Harjo (2019-current), about poetry in times of crisis as well as its enduring power to promote social justice. Presented in partnership with National Book Festival Presents.

Location: Online only—this event will premiere with closed captions on both the Library's Facebook page and its YouTube site, and will be archived as a webcast on the Library’s website.

Contact: specialevents@loc.gov

 

Race in America: Colson Whitehead

Thursday, July 16, 7:00 PM
RACE IN AMERICA: COLSON WHITEHEAD

Librarian of Congress Carla Hayden will talk to two-time Pulitzer Prize winner and National Book Festival veteran (200920122016 and this year) Colson Whitehead about the need for stories from our past to help us contend with the present—especially at moments of great change. Presented in partnership with National Book Festival Presents.

Location: Online only—this event will premiere with closed captions on both the Library's Facebook page and its YouTube site, and will be archived as a webcast on the Library’s website.

Contact: specialevents@loc.gov

Fri,19 Jun 2020
Celebrating Juneteenth & More

Carla D. Hayden, Librarian of Congress

Friends,

Today is Juneteenth, thought to be the longest running celebration of the end of slavery in the United States. On June 19, 1865, notice of the Emancipation Proclamation freeing enslaved people finally reached Texas through an order read aloud by Union General Gordon Grange in Galveston. The word arrived a whopping two and a half years late. Abraham Lincoln’s initial draft of the Emancipation Proclamation is among the treasures contained in the Manuscript Division at the Library of Congress, and is viewable online here. www.loc.gov/exhibits/civil-war-in-america/december-1862-october-1863.html#obj4

In fact, the Library plays host to a wealth of resources and materials related to the emancipation holiday and its celebration throughout American history, as well to the practice of slavery itself and to the voices of formerly enslaved people. Below you will find a list of new blog posts from throughout the Library highlighting a few such resources, including audio recordings from our poignant collection, “Voices Remembering Slavery: Freed People Tell Their Stories.” Other materials are being shared on our social media accounts throughout the day.

InformationThis year’s Juneteenth celebrations have special significance and poignancy in today’s climate where issues of racial injustice are again at the forefront. Today at 4 p.m. ET, I am hosting a virtual conversation with current National Ambassador for Young People’s Literature Jason Reynolds and former National Ambassador Jacqueline Woodson about ways to hear and support kids during a period of nationwide protest against injustice. This event is part of our new online series "Hear You, Hear Me: Conversations on Race in America," which you can also learn more about below. You can watch it on our Facebook page, our YouTube channel or on our main website at loc.gov. I hope to “see” you there.

Sincerely,
Carla Hayden, Librarian of Congress


Juneteenth-Related Posts from Across the Library's Blogs

Billy McCraeThe Birth of Juneteenth; Voices of the Enslaved
blogs.loc.gov/loc/2020/06/the-birth-of-juneteenth-voices-of-the-enslaved/​

Ralph Ellison’s “Juneteenth"
blogs.loc.gov/catbird/2020/06/ralph-ellisons-juneteenth/​

Born in Slavery: Portraits and Narratives of Formerly Enslaved People
blogs.loc.gov/picturethis/2020/06/born-in-slavery-portraits-and-narratives-of-formerly-enslaved-people/

Becky Elzy and Alberta Bradford: Spiritual Folklorists
blogs.loc.gov/folklife/2018/02/becky-elzy-and-alberta-bradford-spiritual-folklorists/

When a Former Enslaved Person Debated a Former Confederate in the House of Representatives
blogs.loc.gov/law/2020/06/when-a-former-slave-debated-a-former-confederate-in-the-house-of-representatives/


“Hear You, Hear Me”: Conversations on Race in America

This new online series features Librarian of Congress Carla Hayden in conversation with some of the nation’s great literary figures, and will highlight what poetry and literature can offer the nation as it contends with foundational issues of social justice.

  • Jason Reynolds and Jacqueline Woodson: TODAY, June 19, 4-5 p.m. ET
  • Joy Harjo and Tracy K. Smith: Thursday, July 9, 7-8 p.m. ET
  • Colson Whitehead: Thursday, July 16, 7-8 p.m. ET

All of the conversations will be available for viewing after the launch.

Event details: blogs.loc.gov/national-book-festival/2020/06/hear-you-hear-me-virtual-programs-feature-conversations-on-race-in-america/
Videos: loc.gov/programs/national-book-festival/national-book-festival-presents/


The Boccaccio Project

The Boccaccio Project: Concerts in Response to the COVID-19 Pandemic

Watch as the Library premieres as series of 10 commissions of new music from composers across America in The Boccaccio Project, inspired by a similar literary effort in the mid-14th century by Giovanni Boccaccio.

Watch as each concert premieres nightly at 8 p.m.June 15-26, or watch the full series: 
loc.gov/concerts/boccaccio-project/


LCMLatest LCM Commemorates the End of World War II

In the new issue of the Library of Congress Magazine, we commemorate the 75th anniversary of end of World War II and the service of the men and women who fought in that conflict.

Features include:

  • a one-of-a-kind map, made by Japanese pilots that detailed the damage inflicted at Pearl Harbor
  • Manuscript Division collections that preserve photos taken in the field by Gen. George S. Patton
  • commentary by Pulitzer Prize-winner Rick Atkinson on a war whose consequences continue to unspool more than seven decades later

... and more. Download your copy today: loc.gov/lcm/


Save the Date! The 2020 National Book Festival is Going Virtual

The 20th Library of Congress National Book Festival will celebrate “American Ingenuity” in 2020, featuring the creativity and inspiration of some of the nation’s most gifted authors in a reimagined virtual festival the weekend of Sept. 25-27. The festival is part of the Library’s 220th anniversary year, and more details will be announced at a later date.

loc.gov/item/prn-20-039/


Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, Transgender and Queer (LGBTQ) Pride Month

June Is LGBTQ Pride Month

June is Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, Transgender and Queer (LGBTQ) Pride Month and June 2020 marks the 50th anniversary of annual LGBTQ+ Pride traditions. The first Pride march in New York City was held on June 28, 1970 on the one-year anniversary of the Stonewall Uprising. Primary sources available at the Library of Congress provide detailed information about how this first Pride march was planned, and the reasons why activists felt so strongly that it should exist.

loc.gov/lgbt-pride-month/


Library of Congress

Support the Library

We are more grateful than ever for all that you do to keep us strong. Whether you support the Library with a gift or simply by spreading the word about what we do, you help us in our mission to connect millions of people around the world with the stories of our collective past, present, and future.

If you haven't yet had a chance to give and you're in a position to donate, please consider making a gift at loc.gov/donate/.

 

Wed,10 Jun 2020
Cultural Institutions in Times of Social Unrest

Lonnie Bunch & Carla Hayden: Cultural Institutions in Times of Social UnrestFriends,

Once again, America finds itself confronting difficult questions about race and inequality.

The struggle for freedom and equality dates back to our nation’s founding, and it is possible to find context and inspiration in the words of those who have fought for a more perfect union since the beginning.

But, libraries offer more than just historical context on today’s events. They offer safe spaces to have difficult conversations about the challenges facing our nation today. They are places of welcome and respite and community. They are collectors of the stories and experiences that have brought us to this place in our nation’s history and can inspire us to persevere in our efforts to pursue that more perfect union.

Last week, I hosted one such conversation with Smithsonian Institution Secretary Lonnie Bunch to discuss the future of our cultural institutions and how we remain accessible and relevant during a period of global pandemic coupled with nationwide protests against injustice.

Lonnie Bunch reminded all of us that “there is hope in history.” So, I leave you with a quote of his from our conversation and invite you to watch it in its entirety at loc.gov/item/webcast-9194/.

"So there’s a kind of, hopefully, a tipping point where people come together and recognize that the past should give you some hope. If people could work together to found the NAACP or work together to end slavery then we can work together to begin to address this as well. So I find hope in history. Not always optimism, but I find hope in history.”

Below you will find links to information about the NAACP collection at the Library of Congress along with other examples of courage and hope that have transformed our nation.

Sincerely,
Carla Hayden, Librarian of Congress


NAACP: A Century in the Fight for Freedom

Originally mounted in 2009 and available online, this exhibition presents a retrospective of the major personalities, events, and achievements that shaped the NAACP’s history during its first 100 years.

Founded in 1909, the National Association for the Advancement of Colored People (NAACP) is the nation’s oldest and largest civil rights organization. Since 1964, the Library of Congress has served as its official repository, and the NAACP Records now consist of more than five million items dating from 1909 to the present. The records encompass a wide variety of materials, including manuscripts, photographs, prints, pamphlets, broadsides, audiotapes, phonograph records, films, and video recordings. Every phase of the NAACP's many activities can be found in this rich and diverse collection.

The NAACP Records are the largest single collection ever acquired by the Library and annually the most heavily used. These records are the cornerstone of the Library’s unparalleled resources for the study of the twentieth-century civil rights movement in the U.S. that also include the original records of the National Urban League, the NAACP Legal Defense and Educational Fund, the Brotherhood of Sleeping Car Porters, and the Leadership Conference on Civil Rights, as well as the microfilmed records of the Student Nonviolent Coordinating Committee (SNCC), the Congress of Racial Equality (CORE), and the Southern Christian Leadership Conference (SCLC). 

loc.gov/exhibits/naacp/overview.html


 Civil Rights History Project screenshot

Civil Rights History Project

On May 12, 2009, the U. S. Congress authorized a national initiative by passing The Civil Rights History Project Act of 2009 (Public Law 111-19). The law directed the Library of Congress (LOC) and the Smithsonian Institution's National Museum of African American History and Culture (NMAAHC) to conduct a national survey of existing oral history collections with relevance to the Civil Rights movement to obtain justice, freedom and equality for African Americans and to record and make widely accessible new interviews with people who participated in the struggle.

The activists interviewed for this project belong to a wide range of occupations and the video recordings of their recollections cover a wide range of topics within the freedom struggle, such as the influence of the labor movement, nonviolence and self-defense, religious faith, music, and the experiences of young activists. Actions and events discussed in the interviews include the Freedom Rides (1961), the Albany Movement (1961), the March on Washington for Jobs and Freedom (1963), the Selma to Montgomery Rights March (1965), the Orangeburg Massacre (1968), the Poor People’s Campaign (1968), sit-ins, and voter registration drives in the South. The murder of fourteen year old Emmett Till in 1955, a horrific event that galvanized many young people into joining the freedom movement, looms large in the memories of many movement veterans.

loc.gov/collections/civil-rights-history-project/about-this-collection/


Rosa Parks: In Her Own Words

Rosa Parks: In Her Own Words

Rosa Parks (1913–2005) is best known for her refusal to give up her seat to a white man on a crowded bus in Montgomery, Alabama, on December 1, 1955. Her arrest sparked the Montgomery Bus Boycott, a pivotal event in the civil rights movement that ultimately led to the dismantling of Jim Crow segregation. Rosa Parks became an icon of the movement, celebrated for this single courageous act of civil disobedience, but she is often characterized by misconceptions. Contrary to popular belief, Parks was not a demure seamstress who chose not to stand because she was physically tired. Her calm demeanor hid a militant spirit forged over decades.

Exhibition: loc.gov/exhibitions/rosa-parks-in-her-own-words/about-this-exhibition/
Blog post - "A Protestor Who Changed America": blogs.loc.gov/loc/2020/06/a-protester-who-changed-america-rosa-parks/


 Shall Not Be Denied: Women Fight for the Vote

Shall Not Be Denied: Women Fight for the Vote

This exhibition tells the story of the seventy-two-year campaign for women’s suffrage. Considered the largest reform movement in American history, its participants believed that securing the vote was essential to achieving women’s economic, social, and political equality. For years, determined women organized, lobbied, paraded, petitioned, lectured, picketed, and faced imprisonment. Their collective story is one of courage, perseverance, savvy, creativity, and hope that continues to inspire activists today.

loc.gov/exhibitions/women-fight-for-the-vote/about-this-exhibition/


Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, Transgender and Queer (LGBTQ) Pride Month

June Is LGBTQ Pride Month

June is Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, Transgender and Queer (LGBTQ) Pride Month and June 2020 marks the 50th anniversary of annual LGBTQ+ Pride traditions. The first Pride march in New York City was held on June 28, 1970 on the one-year anniversary of the Stonewall Uprising. Primary sources available at the Library of Congress provide detailed information about how this first Pride march was planned, and the reasons why activists felt so strongly that it should exist.

loc.gov/lgbt-pride-month/


Library of Congress

Support the Library

We are more grateful than ever for all that you do to keep us strong. Whether you support the Library with a gift or simply by spreading the word about what we do, you help us in our mission to connect millions of people around the world with the stories of our collective past, present, and future.

If you haven't yet had a chance to give and you're in a position to donate, please consider making a gift at loc.gov/donate/.

 

Thu,04 Jun 2020
Poetry & Literature: News & Events: JUNE VIRTUAL EVENTS

A Good Story Knows No Borders

Thursday, June 4, 7:00 PM
A GOOD STORY KNOWS NO BORDERS

This spring event honors 2019 Library of Congress Prize for American Fiction winner Richard Ford, in conversation with Marie Arana, Library of Congress literary director. Ford, whose work has been translated into dozens of languages, will speak on the universality of fiction. Presented in partnership with National Book Festival Presents.

Location: Online only—this event will be streamed with closed captions from both the Library's Facebook page and YouTube site, and available for viewing afterwards at those sites and on the Library of Congress website.
Contact: specialevents@loc.gov

 

 

Carla Hayden and Lonnie Bunch

Friday, June 5, 7:00 PM
CARLA HAYDEN AND LONNIE BUNCH: CULTURAL INSTITUTIONS AT TIMES OF SOCIAL UNREST

Librarian of Congress Carla Hayden and Smithsonian Institution Secretary Lonnie Bunch will discuss the future of their institutions and how they remain accessible and relevant during a period of global pandemic coupled with nationwide protests against injustice. Bunch is the author of "A Fool's Errand: Creating the National Museum of African American History and Culture in the Era of Bush, Obama, and Trump." Presented in partnership with National Book Festival Presents.

Location: Online only—this event will be streamed with closed captions from both the Library's Facebook page and YouTube site, and available for viewing afterwards at those sites and on the Library of Congress website.
Contact: specialevents@loc.gov

 

 

Marilyn Chin

Thursday, June 11, 4:00 PM
LIFE OF A POET: EDUCATOR WEBINAR WITH MARILYN CHIN

Award-winning poet Marilyn Chin, who was featured in the Library’s “Life of a Poet” series in 2018, will participate in a webinar conversation with educators to introduce her own approach to writing, share and discuss two of her poems, and dedicate time for Q&A. This webinar is free and open to educators. Registration is required. Co-sponsored by the Library’s Learning and Innovation Office and presented in partnership with the National Council of Teachers of English (NCTE).

Location: Online only—this webinar will be hosted via Zoom; registration required
Contact: poetry@loc.gov

 

 

Ha Jin on Li Bai

Thursday, June 11, 7:00 PM
HA JIN ON THE LEGENDARY POET LI BAI

National Book Award winner Ha Jin will discuss his new book, “The Banished Immortal: A Life of Li Bai,” in which he draws on a range of historical and literary sources to weave the life story of the eighth-century Chinese poet Li Bai. Rob Casper, head of the Library of Congress Poetry and Literature Center, will moderate. Presented in partnership with National Book Festival Presents.

Location: Online only—this event will be streamed with closed captions from both the Library's Facebook page and YouTube site, and available for viewing afterwards at those sites and on the Library of Congress website.
Contact: specialevents@loc.gov

 

 

Winston Churchill

Thursday, June 18, 7:00 PM
ERIK LARSON, WINSTON CHURCHILL: THE RIGHT WORDS AT THE RIGHT TIME

Erik Larson will discuss his latest book, “The Splendid and the Vile,” which tells the story of Winston Churchill during the London Blitz of World War II, with philanthropist and National Book Festival co-chairman David Rubenstein. Presented in partnership with National Book Festival Presents.

Location: Online only—this event will be streamed with closed captions from both the Library's Facebook page and YouTube site, and available for viewing afterwards at those sites and on the Library of Congress website.
Contact: specialevents@loc.gov

 

 

Poetry Ancestors

Thursday, June 25, 7:00 PM
POETRY ANCESTORS: HOW INVENTION MEETS INFLUENCE

American Book Award winner Kimiko Hahn and award-winning poet Rajiv Mohabir talk about invention and influence across borders, and how poetry serves as a model for our moment, with Washington Post Book World critic Ron Charles. Presented in partnership with National Book Festival Presents.

Location: Online only—this event will be streamed with closed captions from both the Library's Facebook page and YouTube site, and available for viewing afterwards at those sites and on the Library of Congress website.
Contact: specialevents@loc.gov

Wed,27 May 2020
Poetry & Literature: News & Events: CORRECTION: UPCOMING VIRTUAL EVENTS

50 Years of LGBTQ Pride

Thursday, May 28, 7:00 PM
CELEBRATING 50 YEARS OF LGBTQ PRIDE

In honor of LGBTQ Pride month (June) and the 50th anniversary of Pride celebrations, Eric Cervini will discuss his book “The Deviant’s War: The Homosexual vs. the United States of America,” with Roswell Encina, Library of Congress chief communications officer. Presented in partnership with National Book Festival Presents.

Location: Online only—this event will be streamed from both the Library's Facebook page and its YouTube site (with captions), and will be archived as a webcast on the Library’s website.
Contact: specialevents@loc.gov

 

A Good Story Knows No Borders

Thursday, June 4, 7:00 PM
A GOOD STORY KNOWS NO BORDERS

This spring event honors 2019 Library of Congress Prize for American Fiction winner Richard Ford, in conversation with Marie Arana, Library of Congress literary director. Ford, whose work has been translated into dozens of languages, will speak on the universality of fiction. Presented in partnership with National Book Festival Presents.

Location: Online only—this event will be streamed from both the Library's Facebook page and its YouTube site (with captions), and will be archived as a webcast on the Library’s website.
Contact: specialevents@loc.gov

 

Marilyn Chin

Thursday, June 11, 4:00 PM
LIFE OF A POET: EDUCATOR WEBINAR WITH MARILYN CHIN

Award-winning poet Marilyn Chin, who was featured in the Library’s “Life of a Poet” series in 2018, will participate in a webinar conversation with educators to introduce her own approach to writing, share and discuss two of her poems, and dedicate time for Q&A. This webinar is free and open to educators. Registration is required. Co-sponsored by the Library’s Learning and Innovation Office and presented in partnership with the National Council of Teachers of English (NCTE).

Location: Online only—this webinar will be hosted via Zoom; registration required
Contact: poetry@loc.gov

 

Ha Jin on Li Bai

Thursday, June 11, 7:00 PM
HA JIN ON THE LEGENDARY POET LI BAI

National Book Award winner Ha Jin will discuss his new book, “The Banished Immortal: A Life of Li Bai,” in which he draws on a range of historical and literary sources to weave the life story of the eighth-century Chinese poet Li Bai. Rob Casper, head of the Library of Congress Poetry and Literature Center, will moderate. Presented in partnership with National Book Festival Presents.

Location: Online only—this event will be streamed from both the Library's Facebook page and its YouTube site (with captions), and will be archived as a webcast on the Library’s website.
Contact: specialevents@loc.gov

 

Winston Churchill

Thursday, June 18, 7:00 PM
ERIK LARSON, WINSTON CHURCHILL: THE RIGHT WORDS AT THE RIGHT TIME

Erik Larson will discuss his latest book, “The Splendid and the Vile,” which tells the story of Winston Churchill during the London Blitz of World War II, with philanthropist and National Book Festival co-chairman David Rubenstein. Presented in partnership with National Book Festival Presents.

Location: Online only—this event will be streamed from both the Library's Facebook page and its YouTube site (with captions), and will be archived as a webcast on the Library’s website.
Contact: specialevents@loc.gov

 

Poetry Ancestors

Thursday, June 25, 7:00 PM
POETRY ANCESTORS: HOW INVENTION MEETS INFLUENCE

American Book Award winner Kimiko Hahn and award-winning poet Rajiv Mohabir talk about invention and influence across borders, and how poetry serves as a model for our moment, with Washington Post Book World critic Ron Charles. Presented in partnership with National Book Festival Presents.

Location: Online only—this event will be streamed from both the Library's Facebook page and its YouTube site (with captions), and will be archived as a webcast on the Library’s website.
Contact: specialevents@loc.gov

Wed,27 May 2020
Poetry & Literature: News & Events: UPCOMING VIRTUAL EVENTS

50 Years of LGBTQ Pride

Thursday, May 28, 7:00 PM
CELEBRATING 50 YEARS OF LGBTQ PRIDE

In honor of LGBTQ Pride month (June) and the 50th anniversary of Pride celebrations, Eric Cervini will discuss his book “The Deviant’s War: The Homosexual vs. the United States of America,” with Roswell Encina, Library of Congress chief communications officer. Presented in partnership with National Book Festival Presents.

Location: Online only—this event will be streamed from both the Library's Facebook page and its YouTube site (with captions), and will be archived as a webcast on the Library’s website.
Contact: specialevents@loc.gov

 

A Good Story Knows No Borders

Thursday, June 4, 7:00 PM
A GOOD STORY KNOWS NO BORDERS

This spring event honors 2019 Library of Congress Prize for American Fiction winner Richard Ford, in conversation with Marie Arana, Library of Congress literary director. Ford, whose work has been translated into dozens of languages, will speak on the universality of fiction. Presented in partnership with National Book Festival Presents.

Location: Online only—this event will be streamed from both the Library's Facebook page and its YouTube site (with captions), and will be archived as a webcast on the Library’s website.
Contact: specialevents@loc.gov

 

Marilyn Chin

Thursday, June 11, 4:00 PM
LIFE OF A POET: EDUCATOR WEBINAR WITH MARILYN CHIN

Award-winning poet Marilyn Chin, who was featured in the Library’s “Life of a Poet” series in 2018, will participate in a webinar conversation with educators to introduce her own approach to writing, share and discuss two of her poems, and dedicate time for Q&A. This webinar is free and open to educators. Registration is required. Co-sponsored by the Library’s Learning and Innovation Office and presented in partnership with the National Council of Teachers of English (NCTE).

Location: Online only—this webinar will be hosted via Zoom; registration required
Contact: poetry@loc.gov

 

Ha Jin on Li Bai

Thursday, June 11, 7:00 PM
HA JIN ON THE LEGENDARY POET LI BAI

National Book Award winner Ha Jin will discuss his new book, “The Banished Immortal: A Life of Li Bai,” in which he draws on a range of historical and literary sources to weave the life story of the eighth-century Chinese poet Li Bai. Rob Casper, head of the Library of Congress Poetry and Literature Center, will moderate. Presented in partnership with National Book Festival Presents.

Location: Online only—this event will be streamed from both the Library's Facebook page and its YouTube site (with captions), and will be archived as a webcast on the Library’s website.
Contact: specialevents@loc.gov

 

Winston Churchill

Thursday, June 18, 7:00 PM
WINSTON CHURCHILL: THE RIGHT WORDS AT THE RIGHT TIME

Erik Larson will discuss his latest book, “The Splendid and the Vile,” which tells the story of Winston Churchill during the London Blitz of World War II, with philanthropist and National Book Festival co-chairman David Rubenstein. Presented in partnership with National Book Festival Presents.

Location: Online only—this event will be streamed from both the Library's Facebook page and its YouTube site (with captions), and will be archived as a webcast on the Library’s website.
Contact: specialevents@loc.gov

 

Poetry Ancestors

Thursday, June 25, 7:00 PM
POETRY ANCESTORS: HOW INVENTION MEETS INFLUENCE

American Book Award winner Kimiko Hahn and award-winning poet Rajiv Mohabir talk about invention and influence across borders, and how poetry serves as a model for our moment, with Washington Post Book World critic Ron Charles. Presented in partnership with National Book Festival Presents.

Location: Online only—this event will be streamed from both the Library's Facebook page and its YouTube site (with captions), and will be archived as a webcast on the Library’s website.
Contact: specialevents@loc.gov

Fri,22 May 2020
Memorial Day Weekend Update from the Library of Congress

Carla D. Hayden, Librarian of CongressFriends,

I hope that you and your families remain well this month. On Monday, we will observe Memorial Day, honoring the service and sacrifices of members of our armed forces. Our nation is strong and it endures because of the men and women who give it their all in protecting and preserving our democracy.

Since 2000, the Veterans History Project (VHP) at the Library has been committed to collecting, preserving and making accessible the personal accounts of American war veterans. And while many of the stories collected are from living veterans, there are thousands that were donated posthumously by family members looking to preserve the legacies of their loved ones. “Say Their Name. Learn Their Story” is a wonderful blog post highlighting the stories of individuals who have given their lives in service of our country, and who are memorialized in the VHP collections. Read more here: https://blogs.loc.gov/folklife/2019/05/say-their-name-learn-their-story/

The Library of Congress buildings remain closed to the public, with all public events currently canceled until further notice. Visit our web site for full, up-to-date information about our response to COVID-19. In the meantime, we invite you to continue to explore our content digitally through the resources listed below, and to connect with us on our social media channels.

Sincerely,
Carla Hayden, Librarian of Congress


VHP Experiencing War banners

Veterans History Project

Personal narratives, correspondence, and visual materials are collected and made available so that future generations may hear directly from veterans and better understand the realities of war. Learn more about this important project as well how to collect and submit veterans’ stories by visiting loc.gov/vets/.

Experiencing War: Stories from the Veterans History Project

On Friday, May 8, the Veterans History Project (VHP) commemorated the end of World War II in Europe, also known as V-E Day, by releasing a new installment of the VHP online exhibit, Experiencing War. In this new online feature, you can explore the personal stories of 15 World War II veterans and what the end of the war meant for them. 

loc.gov/item/prn-20-035/


Musician image

#FolklifeArchiveChallenge

Although some cities and states are starting to open up a little, we have a feeling it will be a while before we’re going out to concerts, theaters, jams, or open mics to perform or enjoy live music and performing arts. At the Library of Congress, we have an amazing online archive of folk music and folklife which you can explore right from home, and we’d like to offer a suggestion: why not learn a song, tune, poem, or story from the archive, make a recording or video of yourself performing it, and post it online? Or make a work of art based on one of our photos, or write a story or poem based on our materials. We’d love to see what you come up with! Folks from all genres and creators of all art forms are invited to interpret a field recording, video, photo, or manuscript from the AFC Archive. You don’t need to be a professional in order to participate!

Learn more about the challenge and how to participate:
blogs.loc.gov/folklife/2020/05/spending-a-lot-of-time-at-home-take-the-archive-challenge/


Suffrage History Webinar May 27

The Library’s Janice Ruth, curator of our Shall Not Be Denied: Women Fight for the Vote exhibition, will join curators from the National Archives and Records Administration and the Smithsonian’s National Portait Gallery for “Curator’s Cut: An Inside Look at DC’s Suffrage Exhibits.” This free webinar is being hosted by the Women’s Suffrage Centennial Commission.

Register here: https://bit.ly/2TjoWow


Concert imageg

Virtual Concert May 28

The Library of Congress and Portland Ovations will present the International Contemporary Ensemble in the Library’s first interactive digital concert – “Aural Explorations: Farrin, Fure and Messiaen” – on Thursday, May 28, at 7 p.m. Eastern time.

The concert will feature the world premiere of the Library co-commissioned composition by Suzanne Farrin titled “Nacht,” capping a season-long celebration of women composers and performers honoring the centennial of women’s suffrage. The concert will also feature a world premiere of Ashley Fure’s “Interior Listening Protocol 1” paired with Olivier Messiaen’s “Louange à l'Éternité de Jésus” for ondes Martenot and Suzanne Farrin’s “Polvere et Ombra.”

loc.gov/item/prn-20-037/


Asian Pacific American Heritage Month

Asian Pacific American Heritage Month

May is Asian/Pacific American Heritage Month. The Library of Congress, National Archives and Records Administration, National Endowment for the Humanities, National Gallery of Art, National Park Service, Smithsonian Institution and United States Holocaust Memorial Museum join in paying tribute to the generations of Asian and Pacific Islanders who have enriched America's history and are instrumental in its future success. Visit this multi-institution web portal hosted by the Library of Congress for featured content and resources.

asianpacificheritage.gov/


Jewish American Heritage Month

Jewish American Heritage Month

May is Jewish American Heritage Month. The Library of Congress, National Archives and Records Administration, National Endowment for the Humanities, National Gallery of Art, National Park Service and United States Holocaust Memorial Museum join in paying tribute to the generations of Jewish Americans who have helped form the fabric of American history, culture and society. Visit this multi-institution web portal hosted by the Library of Congress for featured content and resources.

jewishheritagemonth.gov/


Library of Congress

Support the Library

We are more grateful than ever for all that you do to keep us strong. Whether you support the Library with a gift or simply by spreading the word about what we do, you help us in our mission to connect millions of people around the world with the stories of our collective past, present, and future.

If you haven't yet had a chance to give and you're in a position to donate, please consider making a gift at loc.gov/donate/.

 

Thu,30 Apr 2020
Poetry & Literature: News & Events: UPCOMING VIRTUAL EVENTS

David Quammen

Thursday, April 30, 7:00 PM
SPILLOVER: ANIMAL INFECTIONS AND THE NEXT HUMAN PANDEMIC

Prize-winning science writer David Quammen will discuss “Spillover,” in which he tracks the animal origins of human diseases through the centuries, with David Rubenstein. Presented in partnership with National Book Festival Presents.

Location: Online only—this event will be streamed from both the Library's Facebook page and its YouTube site (with captions), and will be archived as a webcast on the Library’s website. Contact: specialevents@loc.gov

 

Karl Taro Greenfeld

Thursday, May 7, 7:00 PM
HOW ONE 21ST CENTURY PANDEMIC, SARS, PREDICTED ANOTHER, COVID-19

Author and journalist Karl Taro Greenfeld will discuss his prescient book on the SARS epidemic, which foreshadowed the more devastating COVID-19 pandemic, with the Library of Congress’s Roswell Encina, chief of communications. Presented in partnership with National Book Festival Presents.

Location: Online only—this event will be streamed from both the Library's Facebook page and its YouTube site (with captions), and will be archived as a webcast on the Library’s website. Contact: specialevents@loc.gov

 

Joy Harjo

Friday, May 8, 5:00 PM
BEYOND SUNRISE, THERE IS A SONG WE FOLLOW: U.S. POET LAUREATE JOY HARJO IN CONVERSATION

U.S. Poet Laureate Joy Harjo will discuss her poetry and her work in the laureate position with Rob Casper, head of the Poetry and Literature Center. Co-sponsored by The Association of Writers & Writing Programs (AWP).

Location: Online only—this event will be streamed from AWP’s website, where it will also be archived.
Contact: juanita@awpwriter.org

 

Kate Greene

Thursday, May 14, 7:00 PM
ONCE UPON A TIME I LIVED ON MARS: SPACE, EXPLORATION AND LIFE ON EARTH

NASA astronaut and scientist Kate Greene lived in a simulated Martian environment located on the slopes of Mauna Loa in Hawai’i, where she spent several months in isolation, doing research. She will discuss the stress, loneliness and other challenges of sequestration with Library of Congress Literary Director Marie Arana. Presented in partnership with National Book Festival Presents.

Location: Online only—this event will be streamed from both the Library's Facebook page and its YouTube site (with captions), and will be archived as a webcast on the Library’s website. Contact: specialevents@loc.gov

 

Jill Lepore

Thursday, May 21, 7:00 PM
WHY IT’S HARD TO KNOW THINGS, LATELY. AND HOW COVID-19 WILL GO DOWN IN HISTORY

Bestselling historian and Harvard professor Jill Lepore will discuss how the current pandemic, its effects and our reaction to them say something very real about America in this moment and in the historical record that will emerge from it with John Haskell, director of the John M. Kluge Center at the Library of Congress. Presented in partnership with National Book Festival Presents.

Location: Online only—this event will be streamed from both the Library's Facebook page and its YouTube site (with captions), and will be archived as a webcast on the Library’s website. Contact: specialevents@loc.gov

 

For more information about upcoming events, please visit the Poetry and Literature Center's website.

Fri,24 Apr 2020
The Library of Congress Turns 220

Carla D. Hayden, Librarian of CongressIn 1800, as part of an act of Congress providing for the removal of the new national government from Philadelphia to Washington, President John Adams approved an act of Congress providing $5,000 for books for the use of Congress—the beginning of the Library of Congress.

Since that beginning 220 years ago, the Library has grown to become the largest library in the world with a collection of more than 170 million items that document human creativity and achievement across the centuries and around the globe.

Collecting and providing access to these collections takes on a new meaning and significance in our current world. With social distancing as the norm, and more time spent at home, we want to continue to highlight ways to connect with our content, our knowledgeable staff, and each other during these times. From April 24 to 30, you can celebrate the Library’s 220th birthday by participating in online programs from across the Library, reading themed posts on our blogs and social media channels, and downloading our brand new app to explore the Library’s digital collections from home.

The Library of Congress buildings remain closed to the public, with all public events currently canceled through July 1. Visit our web site for full, up-to-date information about our response to COVID-19. In the meantime, we invite you to our virtual birthday celebration and to continue to engage with us through some of the resources listed below. We look forward to continuing to serve you during this season and beyond.

Sincerely,
Carla Hayden, Librarian of Congress


SPECIAL 220th BIRTHDAY VIDEO EVENTS

Citizen DJCitizen DJ Premiere & Virtual Masterclass
Friday, April 24, 3 p.m. ET

Preview the new Citizen DJ app from Innovator-in-Residence Brian Foo, and discover how to make Hip Hop using the Library’s music collection. Presented by LC Labs.

America's Greatest Library: History of the Library of Congress
Saturday, April 25, 1 p.m. ET

Write. Right. Rite. A "Grab the Mic: Tell Your Story" video series with Jason Reynolds, National Ambassador for Young People's Literature.
Tuesday, April 28, 10:30 a.m. ET

Awareness to Action: Innovate for a Green Future
Wednesday, April 29, 11 a.m. ET

Join the U.S. Copyright Office for their next Copyright Matters lecture that will explore how creators—who through the copyright system can earn a living from their work—can play a key role in creating a vision of a green future and its untold benefits. Registration required.

Social Movement Changing America: The Legacies of the 19th Amendment
Thursday, April 30, 3:30 p.m. ET

A Law Day 2020 event presented by the Law Library of Congress and the American Bar Association. Registration required, space is limited.

Spillover: Animal Infections and the Next Human Pandemic
Thursday, April 30, 7 p.m. ET

Prize-winning science writer David Quammen discusses his book "Spillover," in which he tracks the animal origins of human diseases through the centuries, with National Book Festival Co-Chairman David Rubenstein.

Discover more ways to engage with the Library during our birthday week and beyond:
https://www.loc.gov/engage/


Celebrate National Poetry Month with 50 Newly Available Audio Recordings

The Archive of Recorded Poetry and Literature at the Library of Congress dates back to 1943 and contains nearly two thousand recordings of poets and prose writers participating in literary events at the Library’s Capitol Hill campus as well as sessions at the Library’s Recording Laboratory. New recordings added for 2020 include a 1978 reunion reading featuring 13 of our Consultants in Poetry, and Gwendolyn Brooks reading poems (including the iconic “We Real Cool”) in the Jefferson Recording Laboratory in 1961.

Visit the archive site.
Discover more on this blog post.


Try Activity Kits for the Whole Family

Encourage kids of all ages to use their creativity to complete activities inspired by the Library’s collections. With simple items found around the house and items from our website, kids can Cook Up History, Make a Mini-Book, Color Our Collections, and so much more. Visit the Resources for Family Engagement page to download activity kits and get started today.

https://www.loc.gov/families/


Join the Effort: By the People

We are grateful to all those who transcribe and review pages on the Library's virtual volunteering project By the People launched in 2018. As of the Library’s 220th birthday today, volunteers have transcribed over 125,000 pages from the papers of suffragists including Mary Church Terrell, Lucy Stone, and Susan B Anthony, civil rights activist Rosa Parks, poet Walt Whitman, President Abraham Lincoln, and many others. Once a whole item such as a journal or letter is complete, it is brought back to loc.gov where it radically improves search and discovery for patrons, and accessibility those who use screen readers.

https://crowd.loc.gov/


Preservation Week

National Preservation Week is April 26 – May 2. Preservation of the world's largest collection is accomplished through a broad range of activities distributed across the Library. Learn more about these preservation activities and the work to keep the collections available for the next 220 years and beyond.

https://www.loc.gov/preservation/


Coronavirus Updates from the Copyright Office

The Copyright Office has announced updated flexibility surrounding registration deposits and timing provisions for those affected by COVID-19 as outlined in the Coronavirus Aid, Relief, and Economic Security (CARES) Act. Visit the Copyright Office COVID-19 page for more info.

https://www.copyright.gov/coronavirus/


Library of Congress

Support the Library

We are more grateful than ever for all that you do to keep us strong. Whether you support the Library with a gift or simply by spreading the word about what we do, you help us in our mission to connect millions of people around the world with the stories of our collective past, present, and future.

If you haven't yet had a chance to give and you're in a position to donate, please consider making a gift at loc.gov/donate/.

 

Fri,10 Apr 2020
A Message from the Librarian of Congress

Carla D. Hayden, Librarian of CongressFriends,

I hope that you are taking care or yourselves and your families as we settle into a new normal amid the COVID-19 pandemic. During these challenging times, the Library of Congress buildings remain closed to the public with all public events currently canceled through May 11. However, while our physical doors may be closed, we are still here for you.

The Library’s vast online resources offer unlimited opportunities to discover something new for families, educators, researchers and anyone curious enough to join us.

Our dedicated and talented Library staff remain hard at work, remotely expanding online collections, cataloging, registering Copyrights and advising Congress, while also developing new virtual events and offerings that offer new ways to engage. Below you will find just a few ways that you can continue to find excellent programs and content from the Library.

Thank you for your support of the Library of Congress, and we invite you to continue to (virtually) engage with us safely at home. Visit our web site for full, up-to-date information about our response to COVID-19.

Sincerely,
Carla Hayden, Librarian of Congress


Image of Dav Pilkey & Jason Reynolds

Engage!

Children’s author and illustrator Dav Pilkey shares new activities and exciting videos every Friday. DETAILS: https://www.loc.gov/item/prn-20-026/

Jason Reynolds, the National Ambassador for Young People’s Literature, shares his passion for storytelling through a new monthly GRAB THE MIC newsletter and "Write. Right. Rite.," a twice-weekly "Grab the Mic" video series. DETAILS: https://www.loc.gov/item/prn-20-028/

Poets Laureate Joy Harjo, Robert Pinsky, Natasha Trethewey and Juan Felipe Herrera talk to Ron Charles of The Washington Post about "The Poetry of Home" in a series for National Poetry Month. DETAILS: https://www.loc.gov/item/prn-20-029/

Find more ways to engage with authors you love and connect to the Library’s resources from anywhere in the world on this new, frequently-updated page: https://loc.gov/engage/


Rosa ParksRosa Parks: In Her Own Words – Visit the Exhibition Online

Visit fascinating exhibitions online including our current exhibition on Rosa Parks which showcases rarely seen materials that offer an intimate view of Rosa Parks and documents her life and activism—creating a rich opportunity for viewers to discover new dimensions to their understanding of this seminal figure.

https://www.loc.gov/exhibitions/rosa-parks-in-her-own-words/about-this-exhibition/


For Educators: Classroom Materials & Online Office Hours

The Library of Congress offers classroom materials and professional development to help teachers effectively use primary sources from the Library's vast digital collections in their teaching. https://loc.gov/teachers/

Join Library of Congress education specialists for 20-minute topical presentations followed by Q&A every Tuesday and Thursday 2-3 p.m. ET. https://loc.gov/teachers/professionaldevelopment/office-hours/


Image of Washington, D.C.

Explore Digital Collections

Dive into the Library’s digital collections to explore just about any topic imaginable. Click through historical portraits and cityscape photographs, listen to sound recordings and oral histories, study American history and world cultures, discover local history and folklife traditions, explore maps, music, manuscripts and so much more. With digitized collections of more than 2.4 million items, it’s all at your fingertips.

https://loc.gov/collections/


Coronavirus Resource Guide

This is intended as a guide to laws, regulations and executive actions in the United States, at both the federal and the state level, and in various countries with respect to the new coronavirus and its spread. It also includes links to the Library's Congressional Research Service reports that provide information to Congress about the novel coronavirus. In addition, we provide links to relevant federal agency websites.

https://blogs.loc.gov/law/2020/03/coronavirus-resource-guide/


Ask a Librarian – We’re Open for (Online) Business

Most of the Library’s reference librarians are now teleworking in response to the coronavirus pandemic. But our Ask a Librarian service remains open! Submit questions to receive research or reference help.

More: https://blogs.loc.gov/loc/2020/03/ask-a-librarian-were-open-for-online-business/­


Library of Congress

Support the Library

Thank you for being an important part of the Library of Congress family. During these difficult times, we are more grateful than ever for your support. Your generosity helps keep us strong and allows us to be ready when crises lift. Please stay safe. Visit loc.gov/donate and consider making a gift to ensure the Library’s resources help everyone who needs them.

 

Wed,18 Mar 2020
Poetry & Literature: News & Events: SPRING EVENT POSTPONEMENTS/CANCELLATIONS

On Thursday, March 12, the Library of Congress closed all Library buildings to the public until April 1. On Tuesday, March 17, the Library announced that all public events are canceled until May 11 to reduce the risk of transmitting COVID-19 coronavirus. Whenever possible, the Library will reschedule the public programs that have been canceled. Please read the Library's public statement, and see the Poetry and Literature Center's event updates below.

 

Jeffrey Rosen and Dahlia Lithwick

Thursday, March 19, 7:00 PM
NATIONAL BOOK FESTIVAL PRESENTS JEFFREY ROSEN AND DAHLIA LITHWICK

This event has been CANCELED.
We sincerely apologize for any inconvenience this may cause.

Author Jeffrey Rosen will discuss his new book, Conversations with RBG: Ruth Bader Ginsburg on Life, Love, Liberty and Law, with Dahlia Lithwick, a senior editor at Slate. This event is free and open to the public. Co-sponsored by the Law Library of Congress and presented in partnership with National Book Festival Presents.

Location: LJ-119, first floor, Thomas Jefferson Building <view map>
Contact: specialevents@loc.gov

 

Richard Ford and Frank Heibert

Thursday, April 2, 7:00 PM
NATIONAL BOOK FESTIVAL PRESENTS RICHARD FORD

This event has been POSTPONED to a later date.
Note: Once a date has been confirmed, the Library of Congress will alert all those who registered for the original event date via their email addresses. We sincerely apologize for any inconvenience this may cause and look forward to seeing you, your family and friends very soon.

In an event titled “A Good Story Knows No Borders,” Library of Congress Prize for American Fiction winner Richard Ford will give a talk about the universality of fiction as well as participate in a discussion with his German translator, Frank Heibert. The discussion will be moderated by Library of Congress Literary Director Marie Arana. This event is free and open to the public. Presented in partnership with National Book Festival Presents.

Location: Coolidge Auditorium, ground floor, Thomas Jefferson Building <view map>
Contact: specialevents@loc.gov

 

Kimiko Hahn

Tuesday, April 21, 7:00 PM
LIFE OF A POET: KIMIKO HAHN

This event has been POSTPONED to a later date.
Note: Once a date has been confirmed, Hill Center will alert all those who registered for the original event date via their email addresses. We sincerely apologize for any inconvenience this may cause and look forward to seeing you, your family and friends very soon.

Poet Kimiko Hahn will discuss her work with Ron Charles, book critic at The Washington Post. This event is free and open to the public. Co-sponsored by Hill Center and The Washington Post.

Location: Hill Center at the Old Naval Hospital (921 Pennsylvania Ave. SE)
Contact: poetry@loc.gov 

 

Joy Harjo

Thursday, April 30, 7:00 PM
NATIONAL BOOK FESTIVAL PRESENTS JOY HARJO

This event has been CANCELED.
We sincerely apologize for any inconvenience this may cause.

Joy Harjo will participate in her closing event as the 23rd U.S. Poet Laureate, which will include a moderated discussion and special musical performance. This event is free and open to the public. Co-sponsored by the Library’s American Folklife Center and Music Division, and presented in partnership with National Book Festival Presents.

Location: Coolidge Auditorium, ground floor, Thomas Jefferson Building <view map>
Contact: specialevents@loc.gov

 

John Hessler

Thursday, May 7, 7:00 PM
NATIONAL BOOK FESTIVAL PRESENTS JOHN HESSLER

This event has been POSTPONED to a later date.
Note: Once a date has been confirmed, the Library of Congress will alert all those who registered for the original event date via their email addresses. We sincerely apologize for any inconvenience this may cause and look forward to seeing you, your family and friends very soon.

John Hessler, specialist in the Library of Congress’ Geography and Map division and author of the best-seller MAP: Exploring the World, will discuss his new book on pre-Columbian cultures, Collecting for the New World. This event is free and open to the public. Presented in partnership with National Book Festival Presents.

Location: LJ-119, first floor, Thomas Jefferson Building <view map>
Contact: specialevents@loc.gov

 

For more information about upcoming events, please visit the Poetry and Literature Center's website. 

Tue,10 Mar 2020
Poetry & Literature: News & Events: CANCELED: WALTER DEAN MYERS AWARD FOR OUTSTANDING CHILDREN’S LITERATURE AND SYMPOSIUM on 3/13

2020 Walter Awards

Friday, March 13, 9:30 AM
NATIONAL BOOK FESTIVAL PRESENTS THE WALTER DEAN MYERS AWARD FOR OUTSTANDING CHILDREN’S LITERATURE AND SYMPOSIUM

This event has been CANCELED.
We Need Diverse Books has canceled The Walter Dean Myers Award for Outstanding Children's Literature and Symposium on Friday, March 13, 2020. We sincerely apologize for any inconvenience this may cause. If you have any questions about this cancellation, you may email carolinerichmond@diversebooks.org.

Please join us in celebrating the 2020 winners and honorees as well as Walter Dean Myers Award for Leadership and Advocacy in Children’s Literature Recipient Dr. Rudine Sims Bishop.

The Walter Dean Myers Award for Outstanding Children’s Literature will be presented during a symposium featuring the honorees and winners. The event will be emceed by award-winning writer Grace Lin and is free and open to the public. Tickets are not required. Book sales and signing to follow. Presented in partnership with National Book Festival Presents and We Need Diverse Books.

Location: Coolidge Auditorium, ground floor, Thomas Jefferson Building <view map>


For more information about upcoming events, please visit the Poetry and Literature Center's website.

Mon,09 Mar 2020
Poetry & Literature: News & Events: REMINDER: UPCOMING MARCH EVENTS

Willie Perdomo

Tuesday, March 10, 7:00 PM
LIFE OF A POET: WILLIE PERDOMO 

Poet Willie Perdomo will discuss his work with Ron Charles, book critic at The Washington Post. This event is free and open to the public. Reservations are required. Co-sponsored by Hill Center and The Washington Post.

Location: Hill Center at the Old Naval Hospital (921 Pennsylvania Ave. SE)
Contact: (202) 707-5394

 

Wednesday, March 11, 4:00 PM
LIFE OF A POET: EDUCATOR WEBINAR WITH WILLIE PERDOMO

Following his featured event in the Life of a Poet series, Willie Perdomo will participate in a webinar conversation with educators to introduce his own approach to writing, share and discuss two of his poems, and dedicate time for Q&A. This webinar is free and open to educators. Registration is required. Co-sponsored by the Library’s Learning and Innovation Office and presented in partnership with the National Council of Teachers of English (NCTE).

Contact: (202) 707-5394

 

Margaret Atwood & Nan Talese

Thursday, March 12, 7:00 PM
NATIONAL BOOK FESTIVAL PRESENTS MARGARET ATWOOD AND NAN TALESE

This event has been POSTPONED to a later date. 
Note: Once a date has been confirmed, the Library of Congress will alert all those who registered for the original event date via their email addresses. We sincerely apologize for any inconvenience this may cause and look forward to seeing you, your family and friends very soon.

Legendary fiction editor and publisher Nan Talese will join one of her most successful novelists, Margaret Atwood, to discuss their work together. The event will be moderated by Library of Congress Literary Director Marie Arana. This is the kickoff of a new National Book Festival Presents feature called “Great American Editors,” which explores the vital role of editors in the writing and publishing process. This event is free and open to the public. Free tickets required; signed copies of Atwood's The Testaments are also available for pre-purchase with ticket reservation. Presented in partnership with National Book Festival Presents.

Location: Coolidge Auditorium, ground floor, Thomas Jefferson Building <view map>
Contact: specialevents@loc.gov

 

Walter Dean Myers Award

Friday, March 13, 9:30 AM
NATIONAL BOOK FESTIVAL PRESENTS THE WALTER DEAN MYERS AWARD FOR OUTSTANDING CHILDREN’S LITERATURE AND SYMPOSIUM

The Walter Dean Myers Award for Outstanding Children’s Literature will be presented during a symposium featuring the honorees and winners. The symposium will be emceed by award-winning writer Grace Lin. This event is free and open to the public. Tickets are not required. Presented in partnership with National Book Festival Presents and We Need Diverse Books.

Location: Coolidge Auditorium, ground floor, Thomas Jefferson Building <view map>
Contact: specialevents@loc.gov

 

Jeffrey Rosen and Dahlia Lithwick

Thursday, March 19, 7:00 PM
NATIONAL BOOK FESTIVAL PRESENTS JEFFREY ROSEN AND DAHLIA LITHWICK

Author Jeffrey Rosen will discuss his new book, Conversations with RBG: Ruth Bader Ginsburg on Life, Love, Liberty and Law, with Dahlia Lithwick, a senior editor at Slate. This event is free and open to the public. Free tickets required; signed copies of Rosen's latest book are also available for pre-purchase with ticket reservation. Co-sponsored by the Law Library of Congress and presented in partnership with National Book Festival Presents.

Location: LJ-119, first floor, Thomas Jefferson Building <view map>
Contact: specialevents@loc.gov

Mon,02 Mar 2020
Poetry & Literature: News & Events: National Ambassador Tour Proposal Process Now Open

Jason Reynolds

The Library of Congress' partner, Every Child a Reader, is currently accepting proposal submissions from libraries, schools, community centers, and organizations interested in hosting an event with Jason Reynolds, the 7th National Ambassador for Young People's Literature.

Reynolds will travel to rural/small underserved communities across the country during his two-year term to have meaningful discussions with young people. Through his platform, “GRAB THE MIC: Tell Your Story, he will connect with, listen to, and empower students to share their stories and start their journey as storytellers.

Organizations are encouraged to put together proposals that support and align with Jason's platform and the mission of the program. 

To learn more about the National Ambassador for Young People's Literature program click here. To learn more about Reynolds’ tenure as Ambassador click here.

Submit your proposal here: https://everychildareader.net/ambassador/

Mon,24 Feb 2020
Poetry & Literature: News & Events: UPCOMING MARCH EVENTS

Willie Perdomo

Tuesday, March 10, 7:00 PM
LIFE OF A POET: WILLIE PERDOMO 

Poet Willie Perdomo will discuss his work with Ron Charles, book critic at The Washington Post. This event is free and open to the public. Reservations are required. Co-sponsored by Hill Center and The Washington Post.

Location: Hill Center at the Old Naval Hospital (921 Pennsylvania Ave. SE)
Contact: (202) 707-5394

 

Wednesday, March 11, 4:00 PM
LIFE OF A POET: EDUCATOR WEBINAR WITH WILLIE PERDOMO

Following his featured event in the Life of a Poet series, Willie Perdomo will participate in a webinar conversation with educators to introduce his own approach to writing, share and discuss two of his poems, and dedicate time for Q&A. This webinar is free and open to educators. Registration is required. Co-sponsored by the Library’s Learning and Innovation Office and presented in partnership with the National Council of Teachers of English (NCTE).

Contact: (202) 707-5394

 

Margaret Atwood & Nan Talese

Thursday, March 12, 7:00 PM
NATIONAL BOOK FESTIVAL PRESENTS MARGARET ATWOOD AND NAN TALESE

Legendary fiction editor and publisher Nan Talese will join one of her most successful novelists, Margaret Atwood, to discuss their work together. The event will be moderated by Library of Congress Literary Director Marie Arana. This is the kickoff of a new National Book Festival Presents feature called “Great American Editors,” which explores the vital role of editors in the writing and publishing process. This event is free and open to the public. Free tickets required; signed copies of Atwood's The Testaments are also available for pre-purchase with ticket reservation. Presented in partnership with National Book Festival Presents.

Location: Coolidge Auditorium, ground floor, Thomas Jefferson Building <view map>
Contact: specialevents@loc.gov

 

Walter Dean Myers Award

Friday, March 13, 9:30 AM
NATIONAL BOOK FESTIVAL PRESENTS THE WALTER DEAN MYERS AWARD FOR OUTSTANDING CHILDREN’S LITERATURE AND SYMPOSIUM

The Walter Dean Myers Award for Outstanding Children’s Literature will be presented during a symposium featuring the honorees and winners. The symposium will be emceed by award-winning writer Grace Lin. This event is free and open to the public. Tickets are not required. Presented in partnership with National Book Festival Presents and We Need Diverse Books.

Location: Coolidge Auditorium, ground floor, Thomas Jefferson Building <view map>
Contact: specialevents@loc.gov

 

Jeffrey Rosen and Dahlia Lithwick

Thursday, March 19, 7:00 PM
NATIONAL BOOK FESTIVAL PRESENTS JEFFREY ROSEN AND DAHLIA LITHWICK

Author Jeffrey Rosen will discuss his new book, Conversations with RBG: Ruth Bader Ginsburg on Life, Love, Liberty and Law, with Dahlia Lithwick, a senior editor at Slate. This event is free and open to the public. Free tickets required; signed copies of Rosen's latest book are also available for pre-purchase with ticket reservation. Co-sponsored by the Law Library of Congress and presented in partnership with National Book Festival Presents.

Location: LJ-119, first floor, Thomas Jefferson Building <view map>
Contact: specialevents@loc.gov

Mon,10 Feb 2020
Poetry & Literature: News & Events: RESERVE YOUR TICKETS FOR "ROSA PARKS: THE HISTORY AND THE HEART" on 2/13

National Book Festival Presents Douglas Brinkley and Jeanne Theoharis

Thursday, February 13, 7:00 PM
NATIONAL BOOK FESTIVAL PRESENTS DOUGLAS BRINKLEY AND JEANNE THEOHARIS

Rosa Parks biographers Douglas Brinkley (Rosa Parks: A Life) and Jeanne Theoharis (The Rebellious Life of Mrs. Rosa Parks) will join moderator and NPR host Michel Martin in a panel discussion titled “Rosa Parks: The History and the Heart.” This event is free and open to the public. Free tickets required; signed copies of the authors’ books are also available for pre-purchase with ticket reservation. Presented in partnership with National Book Festival Presents.

Location: Coolidge Auditorium, ground floor, Thomas Jefferson Building <view map>
Contact: specialevents@loc.gov

 

For more information on upcoming events, visit the Poetry and Literature Center website.

Visit the National Book Festival Presents website to learn more about the series.

Mon,03 Feb 2020
Poetry & Literature: News & Events: CORRECTION: UPCOMING FEBRUARY EVENTS

National Book Festival Presents Alice McDermott, Rep. Mary Gay Scanlon and Margaret Brennan

Thursday, February 6, 7:00 PM
NATIONAL BOOK FESTIVAL PRESENTS ALICE MCDERMOTT, REP. MARY GAY SCANLON AND MARGARET BRENNAN

Prize-winning novelist Alice McDermott will join Rep. Mary Gay Scanlon and CBS anchor Margaret Brennan in a panel conversation titled “Fearless: A Tribute to Irish American Women.” This event is free and open to the public. Free tickets required; signed copies of McDermott’s latest novel, The Ninth Hour, are also available for pre-purchase with ticket reservation. Presented in partnership with National Book Festival Presents and in collaboration with the Embassy of Ireland.

Location: Coolidge Auditorium, ground floor, Thomas Jefferson Building <view map>
Contact: specialevents@loc.gov

 

National Book Festival Presents Douglas Brinkley and Jeanne Theoharis

Thursday, February 13, 7:00 PM
NATIONAL BOOK FESTIVAL PRESENTS DOUGLAS BRINKLEY AND JEANNE THEOHARIS

Rosa Parks biographers Douglas Brinkley (Rosa Parks: A Life) and Jeanne Theoharis (The Rebellious Life of Mrs. Rosa Parks) will join moderator and NPR host Michel Martin in a panel discussion titled “Rosa Parks: The History and the Heart.” This event is free and open to the public. Free tickets required; signed copies of the authors’ books are also available for pre-purchase with ticket reservation. Presented in partnership with National Book Festival Presents.

Location: Coolidge Auditorium, ground floor, Thomas Jefferson Building <view map>
Contact: specialevents@loc.gov

 

For more information on upcoming events, visit the Poetry and Literature Center website.

Visit the National Book Festival Presents website to learn more about the series.

Mon,03 Feb 2020
Poetry & Literature: News & Events: UPCOMING FEBRUARY EVENTS

National Book Festival Presents Alice McDermott, Rep. Mary Gay Scanlon and Margaret Brennan

Tuesday, February 6, 7:00 PM
NATIONAL BOOK FESTIVAL PRESENTS ALICE MCDERMOTT, REP. MARY GAY SCANLON AND MARGARET BRENNAN

Prize-winning novelist Alice McDermott will join Rep. Mary Gay Scanlon and CBS anchor Margaret Brennan in a panel conversation titled “Fearless: A Tribute to Irish American Women.” This event is free and open to the public. Free tickets required; signed copies of McDermott’s latest novel, The Ninth Hour, are also available for pre-purchase with ticket reservation. Presented in partnership with National Book Festival Presents and in collaboration with the Embassy of Ireland.

Location: Coolidge Auditorium, ground floor, Thomas Jefferson Building <view map>
Contact: specialevents@loc.gov

 

National Book Festival Presents Douglas Brinkley and Jeanne Theoharis

Thursday, February 13, 7:00 PM
NATIONAL BOOK FESTIVAL PRESENTS DOUGLAS BRINKLEY AND JEANNE THEOHARIS

Rosa Parks biographers Douglas Brinkley (Rosa Parks: A Life) and Jeanne Theoharis (The Rebellious Life of Mrs. Rosa Parks) will join moderator and NPR host Michel Martin in a panel discussion titled “Rosa Parks: The History and the Heart.” This event is free and open to the public. Free tickets required; signed copies of the authors’ books are also available for pre-purchase with ticket reservation. Presented in partnership with National Book Festival Presents.

Location: Coolidge Auditorium, ground floor, Thomas Jefferson Building <view map>
Contact: specialevents@loc.gov

 

For more information on upcoming events, visit the Poetry and Literature Center website.

Visit the National Book Festival Presents website to learn more about the series.

Tue,14 Jan 2020
Poetry & Literature: News & Events: NATIONAL AMBASSADOR FOR YOUNG PEOPLE’S LITERATURE INAUGURATION: JASON REYNOLDS on 1/16

Jason Reynolds

Thursday, January 16, 10:30 AM
NATIONAL AMBASSADOR FOR YOUNG PEOPLE’S LITERATURE INAUGURATION: JASON REYNOLDS

Award-winning author Jason Reynolds will be inaugurated as the 2020-2021 National Ambassador for Young People’s Literature, the seventh writer to hold this position. Librarian of Congress Carla Hayden will lead a conversation with Reynolds during the ceremony, which will also include a special appearance by 2018-2019 National Ambassador Jacqueline Woodson.

Tickets are not required for this event, which is free and open to the public. This event will also be livestreamed from both the Library's Facebook page and the Library's YouTube site (with captions).

Co-sponsored by Every Child a Reader and the Children’s Book Council, with additional support from Dollar General Literacy Foundation.

Location: Coolidge Auditorium, ground floor, Thomas Jefferson Building <view map>
Contact: (202) 707-5394

To learn more about Jason Reynolds and his activities as National Ambassador, visit his Library of Congress resource guide

Mon,30 Dec 2019
Thanks for Your Support!

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IGNITE THE POWER OF IDEAS!

Thank You!

Thank you for all you do to support the nation’s Library. With new books, films, and music arriving every day, the Library of Congress is your place to discover new ideas. Whether you support us with a gift or simply by spreading the word about what we do, you help us in our mission to connect millions of people around the world with the stories of the world’s past, present, and future.

Spread the word and encourage your friends and family to visit us online or in person and make a gift to the nation’s library today!

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Fri,20 Dec 2019
Make Your Gift Before We Close the Books on 2019!

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IGNITE THE POWER OF IDEAS!

Make Your Gift Before We Close the Books on 2019

The Library of Congress is your place to discover new ideas. Visit our new exhibitions, join us for our events and educational programs and participate in our activities that connect you with millions of people around the world.

Join the community of people that helps ignite the power of ideas and make your tax-deductible donation today!

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