Get Your Premium Membership

Aphrodite, In Sweet Dreams Of Bliss I Cry Out To You, Sonnet Doubles

Poet's Notes
(Show)

Become a Premium Member and post notes and photos about your poem like Robert Lindley.


https://www.britannica.com/topic/Aphrodite-Greek-mythology
 
Aphrodite
Greek mythology
WRITTEN BY
The Editors of Encyclopaedia Britannica
Encyclopaedia Britannica's editors oversee subject areas in which they have extensive knowledge, whether from years of experience gained by working on that content or via study for an advanced degree....
See Article History
Alternative Titles: Pandemos, Urania
Aphrodite, ancient Greek goddess of sexual love and beauty, identified with Venus by the Romans. The Greek word aphros means “foam,” and Hesiod relates in his Theogony that Aphrodite was born from the white foam produced by the severed genitals of Uranus (Heaven), after his son Cronus threw them into the sea. Aphrodite was, in fact, widely worshipped as a goddess of the sea and of seafaring; she was also honoured as a goddess of war, especially at Sparta, Thebes, Cyprus, and other places. However, she was known primarily as a goddess of love and fertility and even occasionally presided over marriage. Although prostitutes considered Aphrodite their patron, her public cult was generally solemn and even austere.
 
Venus de Milo
Venus de Milo
Aphrodite, known as Venus de Milo, marble sculpture, 2nd century BCE; in the Louvre, Paris.
© Bizoon/Dreamstime.com
mythology. Greek. Hermes. (Roman Mercury)
BRITANNICA QUIZ
A Study of Greek and Roman Mythology
What is the name of the Roman goddess of grain?
Some scholars believe Aphrodite’s worship came to Greece from the East; many of her attributes recall the ancient Middle Eastern goddesses Ishtar and Astarte. Although Homer called her “Cyprian” after the island chiefly famed for her worship, she was already Hellenized by the time of Homer, and, according to Homer, she was the daughter of Zeus and Dione, his consort at Dodona. In Book VIII of the Odyssey, Aphrodite was mismatched with Hephaestus, the lame smith god, and she consequently spent her time philandering with the handsome god of war, Ares (by whom she became the mother of Harmonia, the warrior twins Phobos and Deimos, and Eros, the god of love).
 
Aphrodite
Aphrodite
Sculpture of Aphrodite.
AdstockRF
Of Aphrodite’s mortal lovers, the most important were the Trojan shepherd Anchises, by whom she became the mother of Aeneas, and the handsome youth Adonis (in origin a Semitic nature deity and the consort of Ishtar-Astarte), who was killed by a boar while hunting and was lamented by women at the festival of Adonia. The cult of Adonis had underworld features, and Aphrodite was also connected with the dead at Delphi.
 
00:00
02:45
 
Aphrodite’s main centres of worship were at Paphos and Amathus on Cyprus and on the island of Cythera, a Minoan colony, where in prehistoric times her cult probably originated. On the Greek mainland, Corinth was the chief centre of her worship. Her close association with Eros, the Graces (Charites), and the Horae (Seasons) emphasized her role as a promoter of fertility. She was honoured by the Roman poet Lucretius as Genetrix, the creative element in the world. Her epithets Urania (Heavenly Dweller) and Pandemos (Of All the People) were ironically taken by the philosopher Plato (in the Symposium) to refer to intellectual and common love; rather, the title Urania was honorific and applied to certain Asian deities, while Pandemos referred to her standing within the city-state. Among her symbols were the dove, pomegranate, swan, and myrtle.
 
Venus Genetrix
Venus Genetrix
Venus Genetrix (or Aphrodite Genetrix), Roman marble copy of a Classical Greek statue by Callimachus, c. 475 BCE; in the collection of the Louvre, Paris.
G. Dagli Orti—De Agostini Editore/age fotostock
Get exclusive access to content from our 1768 First Edition with your subscription.
Subscribe today
Representations of Aphrodite in early Greek art are fully dressed and without distinguishing features that differentiate her from other goddesses. She first attained individuality at the hands of the great 5th-century-BCE Greek sculptors. Perhaps the most famous of all statues of Aphrodite was carved by Praxiteles for the Cnidians. The first full-scale female nude, it later became the model for such Hellenistic masterpieces as the Venus de Milo (2nd century BCE).
 
 
https://www.britannica.com/topic/Aphrodite-Greek-mythology
 
Aphrodite
Greek mythology
WRITTEN BY
The Editors of Encyclopaedia Britannica
Encyclopaedia Britannica's editors oversee subject areas in which they have extensive knowledge, whether from years of experience gained by working on that content or via study for an advanced degree....
See Article History
Alternative Titles: Pandemos, Urania
Aphrodite, ancient Greek goddess of sexual love and beauty, identified with Venus by the Romans. The Greek word aphros means “foam,” and Hesiod relates in his Theogony that Aphrodite was born from the white foam produced by the severed genitals of Uranus (Heaven), after his son Cronus threw them into the sea. Aphrodite was, in fact, widely worshipped as a goddess of the sea and of seafaring; she was also honoured as a goddess of war, especially at Sparta, Thebes, Cyprus, and other places. However, she was known primarily as a goddess of love and fertility and even occasionally presided over marriage. Although prostitutes considered Aphrodite their patron, her public cult was generally solemn and even austere.
 
Venus de Milo
Venus de Milo
Aphrodite, known as Venus de Milo, marble sculpture, 2nd century BCE; in the Louvre, Paris.
© Bizoon/Dreamstime.com
mythology. Greek. Hermes. (Roman Mercury)
BRITANNICA QUIZ
A Study of Greek and Roman Mythology
What is the name of the Roman goddess of grain?
Some scholars believe Aphrodite’s worship came to Greece from the East; many of her attributes recall the ancient Middle Eastern goddesses Ishtar and Astarte. Although Homer called her “Cyprian” after the island chiefly famed for her worship, she was already Hellenized by the time of Homer, and, according to Homer, she was the daughter of Zeus and Dione, his consort at Dodona. In Book VIII of the Odyssey, Aphrodite was mismatched with Hephaestus, the lame smith god, and she consequently spent her time philandering with the handsome god of war, Ares (by whom she became the mother of Harmonia, the warrior twins Phobos and Deimos, and Eros, the god of love).
 
Aphrodite
Aphrodite
Sculpture of Aphrodite.
AdstockRF
Of Aphrodite’s mortal lovers, the most important were the Trojan shepherd Anchises, by whom she became the mother of Aeneas, and the handsome youth Adonis (in origin a Semitic nature deity and the consort of Ishtar-Astarte), who was killed by a boar while hunting and was lamented by women at the festival of Adonia. The cult of Adonis had underworld features, and Aphrodite was also connected with the dead at Delphi.
 
00:00
02:45
 
Aphrodite’s main centres of worship were at Paphos and Amathus on Cyprus and on the island of Cythera, a Minoan colony, where in prehistoric times her cult probably originated. On the Greek mainland, Corinth was the chief centre of her worship. Her close association with Eros, the Graces (Charites), and the Horae (Seasons) emphasized her role as a promoter of fertility. She was honoured by the Roman poet Lucretius as Genetrix, the creative element in the world. Her epithets Urania (Heavenly Dweller) and Pandemos (Of All the People) were ironically taken by the philosopher Plato (in the Symposium) to refer to intellectual and common love; rather, the title Urania was honorific and applied to certain Asian deities, while Pandemos referred to her standing within the city-state. Among her symbols were the dove, pomegranate, swan, and myrtle.
 
Venus Genetrix
Venus Genetrix
Venus Genetrix (or Aphrodite Genetrix), Roman marble copy of a Classical Greek statue by Callimachus, c. 475 BCE; in the collection of the Louvre, Paris.
G. Dagli Orti—De Agostini Editore/age fotostock
Get exclusive access to content from our 1768 First Edition with your subscription.
Subscribe today
Representations of Aphrodite in early Greek art are fully dressed and without distinguishing features that differentiate her from other goddesses. She first attained individuality at the hands of the great 5th-century-BCE Greek sculptors. Perhaps the most famous of all statues of Aphrodite was carved by Praxiteles for the Cnidians. The first full-scale female nude, it later became the model for such Hellenistic masterpieces as the Venus de Milo (2nd century BCE).
 
https://www.britannica.com/topic/Aphrodite-Greek-mythology
 
Aphrodite
Greek mythology
WRITTEN BY
The Editors of Encyclopaedia Britannica
Encyclopaedia Britannica's editors oversee subject areas in which they have extensive knowledge, whether from years of experience gained by working on that content or via study for an advanced degree....
See Article History
Alternative Titles: Pandemos, Urania
Aphrodite, ancient Greek goddess of sexual love and beauty, identified with Venus by the Romans. The Greek word aphros means “foam,” and Hesiod relates in his Theogony that Aphrodite was born from the white foam produced by the severed genitals of Uranus (Heaven), after his son Cronus threw them into the sea. Aphrodite was, in fact, widely worshipped as a goddess of the sea and of seafaring; she was also honoured as a goddess of war, especially at Sparta, Thebes, Cyprus, and other places. However, she was known primarily as a goddess of love and fertility and even occasionally presided over marriage. Although prostitutes considered Aphrodite their patron, her public cult was generally solemn and even austere.
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Aphrodite, In Sweet Dreams Of Bliss I Cry Out To You, Sonnet Doubles Aphrodite, princess of my romantic dreams burning flames to my heart's inner desires your beauty gifted, a poetic soul redeems goddess of love, true love that never tires. Underneath moon's golden rays and heavenly nights we meet, in a dreamland made just for two your vision bringing forth love's most sensual light passionate touch, Cupid's arrows shot true. Aphrodite, no heart can your deep love deny or satisfaction from your every kiss you are soft twinkle of stars in radiant sky epitome of love, life, joyous bliss. Within this heaving breast, is your heart to now hold. Your passionate embrace, I am forever sold. Robert J. Lindley, 7-11-2020 Sonnet, ( Forever Lost In The Sweet Depths Of A True Love ) Note: Aphrodite: https://www.britannica.com/topic/Aphrodite-Greek-mythology ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~ Remember All That Glitters Is Not Gold Within a silken tapestry of dreams are golden orbs of glittering treasures life is too often not what it may seem if we in haste seek only our pleasures. Far better to view Nature, its beauty as if a mere child just learning to walk knowing life is a gift not a duty we oft may learn more without idle talk. Cease snatching up offerings this world casts those tempting traps that look to be so free Ulysses was pleading, bound to ship's mast to jump overboard, drown in raging seas. Remember all that glitters is not gold. Bountiful are worldly lies we are told. Robert J. Lindley, 7-11-2020 Sonnet, ( If it looks to good to be true, almost always it isn't)

Copyright © | Year Posted 2020




Post Comments

Poetrysoup is an environment of encouragement and growth so only provide specific positive comments that indicate what you appreciate about the poem.

Please Login to post a comment

Date: 7/14/2020 4:54:00 AM
You are a masters master...we bow...awesome sonnets dear Robert...and great insight beforehand...straight to fav's...best wishes...^WW^ :o)
Login to Reply
Lindley Avatar
Robert Lindley
Date: 7/16/2020 4:20:00 PM
Thank you my friend. Your very kind words are humbly received. I truly am so appreciative of your reading, commenting and your gift of fav'ing this piece. God bless...
Date: 7/13/2020 10:05:00 AM
Amazing poetry Robert with valued information attached. Quite an effort of works bringing understanding and a finished marvel to praise and enjoy. You my friend are a gifted writer!!! God bless you for your creativity...
Login to Reply
Lindley Avatar
Robert Lindley
Date: 7/16/2020 4:18:00 PM
Thank you my friend. I am very blessed to be here and be able to participate and enjoy the magnificent creations that a great many wonderful poets present here. God bless..
Date: 7/11/2020 10:46:00 PM
Amazing poetry, Robert, love the journey you take one on with your sonnets, whether in dreams, history, or today...Stay Safe, my friend, Love the Capicha for you,,TEX
Login to Reply
Lindley Avatar
Robert Lindley
Date: 7/16/2020 4:16:00 PM
Thank you my friend. I am blessed indeed to be here, and have the benefit of poetic fellowship and the gleaming gems that you and many others so freely gift this site. God bless..
Date: 7/11/2020 12:57:00 PM
Robert! No poem I ever read on the soup has made me weep. These both did. I have Favs of yours, But this is my FAV to end all Favs! As the earlier commentor stated, there is NO doubt in my my mind you are the best poet here. This does not demean other great poets here at all! It's who you are, the mentor, the writer, the one who loves poetry, life and has lived both to the max and delivers them to us in golden, crystal ribbons. Merci~ Panagiota xx
Login to Reply
Lindley Avatar
Robert Lindley
Date: 7/16/2020 4:14:00 PM
Thank you my friend. I am so truly humbled by your very kind words! So very true this site does indeed have a great many top class poets and we are all very blessed to have fellowship with them. And learn from them. A gift that I am very, very thankful for myself... God bless..
Date: 7/11/2020 12:24:00 PM
Beautiful writing, Robert! You're the best!
Login to Reply
Lindley Avatar
Robert Lindley
Date: 7/16/2020 4:11:00 PM
Thank you my friend. Just returning here to again be with my friends and wonderful fellow poets. A real bummer being sick, but a blessing to again feel much better,, God bless..