Famous Greek Poets - Famous Poets from Greece

This famous Greek poets section is an educational source of information and inspiration featuring reknown Greek poets. Here you will find famous poets of our time and times past from Greece.

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Homer,

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Homer, the great epic poet of Greece, and the greatest of all time; author of the "Iliad" and the "Odyssey". He is one of the most well-known, studied, and referred to poets in the history of the world.
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Sappho,

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Sappho is an Ancient Greek lyric poetess, born in Eresos on the island of Lesbos in Greece. No contemporary historical sources exist for Sappho's life—only her poetry.
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Bible, The

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THE Holy Bible is a written revelation from the Sovereign Lord Jehovah to all people on this earth. This inspired book has global appeal, since it contains good news of a God-designed Messianic Kingdom that will establish peace and righteousness forever on a united Paradise earth. Fittingly, the complete Bible has been referred to as the Divine Library (Lat., Bibliotheca Divina), made up of 66 officially cataloged books that are accepted as the inspired guide for determining truth. While many divide the two major sections of the Bible into “The Old Testament” and “The New Testament,” we designate the first 39 books as the Hebrew Scriptures and the remaining 27 books as the Christian Greek Scriptures, basing such a decision on language rather than on a claimed “Testament” division.
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Pythagoras,

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Pythagoras of Samos was an Ionian Greek philosopher, mathematician, and founder of the religious movement called Pythagoreanism. Pythagoras made influential contributions to philosophy and religious teaching in the late 6th century BC. He is often revered as a great mathematician, mystic and scientist, but he is best known for the Pythagorean theorem which bears his name.
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Cavafy, Constantine P

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Constantine P. Cavafy (also known as Konstantin or Konstantinos Petrou Kavafis, or Kavaphes ; Greek : stat. aßf ; April 29 (April 17, OS ), 1863 – April 29, 1933) was a Greek poet who lived in Alexandria and worked as a journalist and civil servant. He published 154 poems; dozens more remained incomplete or in sketch form. His most important poetry was written after his fortieth birthday.
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Aeschylus,

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Æschylus (es′ki-lus) or Aeschylus was the father of the Greek tragedy, who distinguished himself as a soldier both at Marathon and Salamis before he figured as a poet; wrote, it is said, some seventy dramas, of which only seven are extant—the "Suppliants," the "Persæ," the "Seven against Thebes," the "Prometheus Bound," the "Agamemnon," the "Choephori," and the "Eumenides," his plays being trilogies; born at Eleusis and died in Sicily (525-456 B.C.).
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Kalvos, Andreas

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Andreas Kalvos (Greek : da ß, also transliterated as Andreas Calvos; 1792 - November 3, 1869) was a Greek poet of the Romantic school. He published only two collections of poems - the Lyra of 1824 and the Lyrica of 1826. He was a contemporary of the poets Ugo Foscolo and Dionysios Solomos. No portrait of him is known.
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Varnalis, Kostas

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Kostas Varnalis (Greek : sta a, 14 February 1884 – 16 December 1974) was a Greek poet .
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Archilochus,

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Archilochus, or, Archilochos (Ancient Greek) (c. 680–c. 645 BC) [ nb 1 ] was a Greek lyric poet from the island of Paros in the Archaic period.
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Karyotakis, Kostas

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Kostas Karyotakis (Greek : sta at, October 30, 1896 – July 20, 1928) is considered one of the most representative Greek poets of the 1920s and one of the first poets to use iconoclastic themes in Greece. His poetry conveys a great deal of nature, imagery and traces of expressionism and surrealism. The majority of Karyotakis' contemporaries viewed him in a dim light throughout his lifetime without a pragmatic accountability for their contemptuous views; for after his suicide, the majority began to revert to the view that he was indeed a great poet. He had a significant, almost disproportionately progressive influence on later Greek poets.
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Anacreon,

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Anacreon (Greek a, gen .: at) (582 BC – 485 BC) was a Greek lyric poet, notable for his drinking songs and hymns. Later Greeks included him in the canonical list of nine lyric poets .
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Gogou, Katerina

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Katerina Gogou (Greek : atea G ; 1 June 1940 – 3 October 1993) was a Greek anarchist poet, author and actress. Before her suicide by pill overdose at the age of 53, Gogou appeared in over thirty Greek films.
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Palamas, Kostis

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Kostis Palamas (Greek : st aaµ ; 13 January  [ O.S. 8 January]  1859 – 27 February 1943 ) was a Greek poet who wrote the words to the Olympic Hymn. He was a central figure of the Greek literary generation of the 1880s and one of the cofounders of the so-called New Athenian School (or Palamian School, or Second Athenian School) along with Georgios Drosinis, Nikos Kampas, Ioanis Polemis .
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Anagnostakis, Manolis

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Manolis Anagnostakis (10 March 1925 – 23 June 2005) was a Greek poet and critic at the forefront of the Marxist and existentialist poetry movements arising during and after the Greek Civil War in the late 1940s. Anagnostakis was a leader amongst his contemporaries and influenced the generation of poets immediately after him. His poems have been honored in Greece 's national awards and arranged and sung by contemporary musicians. In spite of his accomplishments, Philip Ramp notes that Anagnostakis "is the least known, to an English speaking audience, of the major Greek poets of his generation." [1]
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Sophocles,

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Sophocles (/ ' s f k l i z / ; Greek : Sf, Sophokles, Ancient Greek:  [sopokl^s] ; c. 497/6 BC – winter 406/5 BC) is one of three ancient Greek tragedians whose plays have survived. His first plays were written later than those of Aeschylus, and earlier than or contemporary with those of Euripides. According to the Suda, a 10th-century encyclopedia, Sophocles wrote 123 plays during the course of his life, but only seven have survived in a complete form: Ajax, Antigone, The Women of Trachis, Oedipus the King, Electra, Philoctetes and Oedipus at Colonus. For almost 50 years, Sophocles was the most- fêted playwright in the dramatic competitions of the city-state of Athens that took place during the religious festivals of the Lenaea and the Dionysia. He competed in around 30 competitions, won perhaps 24, and was never judged lower than second place. Aeschylus won 14 competitions, and was sometimes defeated by Sophocles, while Euripides won only 4 competitions.
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Polydouri, Maria

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Maria Polydouri (Greek : aa d ) (1 April 1902 – 29 April 1930) was a Greek poet .
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Alexandrou, Aris

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Aris Alexandrou (Greek ed ) (1922 – 2 July 1978) was a Greek novelist, poet and translator. Always on the Left and always unconventional ("I belong to the non-existent party of poets"), he is the author of a single novel (To kivotio - Mission Box ) which is widely considered to be among the classic modern Greek works in the second half of the 20th century.
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Broumas, Olga

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Olga Broumas (born 6 May 1949, Hermoupolis), is a Greek poet, resident in the United States.. Greek poet living in the United States
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Elytis, Odysseus

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Odysseas Elytis (Greek: dssa t; real name: Odysseas Alepoudellis, dssa epd) (November 2, 1911 – March 18, 1996) was a Greek poet regarded as a major exponent of poetic modernism in Greece. In 1979, he was awarded the Nobel Prize in Literature.. Greek poet
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Pindar,

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Pindar (Ancient Greek : da, Pindaros, pronounced  [píndaros] ; Latin : Pindarus ) (c. 522–443 BC), was an Ancient Greek lyric poet from Thebes. Of the canonical nine lyric poets of ancient Greece, his work is the best preserved. Quintilian wrote, "Of the nine lyric poets, Pindar is by far the greatest, in virtue of his inspired magnificence, the beauty of his thoughts and figures, the rich exuberance of his language and matter, and his rolling flood of eloquence, characteristics which, as Horace rightly held, make him inimitable." His poems however can also seem difficult and even peculiar. The Athenian comic playwright Eupolis once remarked that they "are already reduced to silence by the disinclination of the multitude for elegant learning". Some scholars in the modern age also found his poetry perplexing, at least up until the discovery in 1896 of some poems by his rival Bacchylides, when comparisons of their work showed that many of Pindar's idiosyncrasies are typical of archaic genres rather than of the poet himself. The brilliance of his poetry then began to be more widely appreciated. However his style still challenges the casual reader and he continues to be a much admired though largely unread poet.
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Euripides,

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Euripides was one of the three great tragedians of classical Athens, the other two being Aeschylus and Sophocles.
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Alcman,

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Alcman, an early Greek lyric poet, born at Sardis.
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Aristophanes,

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Aristophanes (c. 448-385 b.c.), the great comic dramatist and poet of Athens. His birth-year is uncertain. He is known to have been about the same age as Eupolis, and is said to have been “almost a boy” when his first comedy (The Banqueters) was brought out in 427 b.c.
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Agathias,

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Agath′ias, a Greek Byzantine poet and historian (536-582). Author of an anthology, a collection of love poems, and a history of his own times, which is our chief authority for the period 552-8, during which time the Byzantine army was struggling against the Goths, Vandals, and Franks.
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Kavvadias, Nikos

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Nikos Kavvadias (Greek: aßßada; January 11, 1910, Nikolsk-Ussuriysky – February 10, 1975, Athens) was a Greek poet and writer; currently one of the most popular poets in Greece, who used his travels around the world as a sailor, and life at sea and its adventures, as powerful metaphors for the escape of ordinary people outside the boundaries of reality.. Greek poet
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