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Keats - Romantic Humanist

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Author's Notes: "Keats--Romantic Humanist " is a Double Dactyl write that I wrote as a tribute to John Keats the great romantic humanist of the early 19th century. Keats lived a short, but very busy life in destiny and like-fate as did his famous romantic colleagues and contemporaries: Lord George Gordon Byron and Percy Bysshe Shelley. In his fast-fused life beginning with his birth in 1795 and resulting later in a tragic tubercular death in 1821, Keats lived to the young age of 25 but accomplished so much in his short life span similar to Byron and Shelley. His poetry was not popular during his lifetime which was the same for with Shelley; however, like many great writers and artists his reputation grew over time after his death resulting in his being one of the most beloved English poets by the end of the 19th century. In addition to the marvelous poetry he left for posterity, Keats' poetic works went on to influence the development of many popular poets and writers in later years. In formulating my double dactyl theme, I researched a number of his well-known poems to include his various famous lyrical ode writes. I ended up settling on his well-known ballad, "La Belle Dame sans Merci" (from the French: "The Beautiful Lady without Mercy"), as the subject poem of this dactyl write. In addition to Keats' lyrical writes, "La Belle Dame sans Merci" has always been one of my favorite poems from the 19th century with its noticeable imagery and symbolism, and its clear focus on the themes of life and death as a dying knight expires in the supernatural lure of an evil enchantress of great beauty but obvious deadly intention. This poem seemed like just the right fit here for my double dactyl narrative. (Gary Bateman - August 17, 2015) (Double Dactyl)

Categories:  allegory, death, destiny, imagery, love, passion, and symbolism.

Keats—Romantic Humanist  
 
Romanticus-Extraordinaire
John Keats
La Belle Dame sans Merci
Circe-Enchantress to all.

Beautiful, deadly in her elfin grot
Supernatural-nous
She wept and sighed full sore
Hath thee in “Keatsian” thrall.

Gary Bateman, Copyright © All Rights Reserved,
August 17, 2015 (Double Dactyl)

Copyright © | Year Posted 2015




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Date: 8/20/2015 5:17:00 PM
Gary, once again I am amazed by your skilful pen. This is a good tribute to John Keats! The first line"Romanticus -Extraordinaire" grabbed attention instantly. When I finished reading I was not disappointed. Excellent job! :-)Alexis 7
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Gary Bateman
Date: 8/21/2015 11:14:00 AM
Thanks Alexis very much, and for the "7." I'm gratified you liked this double dactyl on John Keats. He did so much so extraordinarily in his short life with his writings in the same vein with Lord Byron and Percy Bysshe Shelley -- two of my other favorites among the many great writers from the past. Cheers and Best, Gary
Date: 8/19/2015 5:15:00 AM
A very elegant double dactyl tribute for an amazing poet! I really like those last two lines..fantastic wording! "La Belle Dame sans Merci" is a stunning poem by the way. A 7, of course! Always, Laura
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Gary Bateman
Date: 8/19/2015 11:30:00 AM
Hello Laura!! Thanks as always Dear One, and thanks for the "7"!! La Belle Dame sans Merci has always been one of my all-time favorite poems from Keats -- and, of course, his famous "Odes" too. You'll notice I added the adjective "Keatsian" in my final dactyl verse from "La Belle Dame sans Merci," to give it an extra Kick, just as the Knight is dying in "Her Elfin Grot." Great Stuff!! Glad you liked it!! Cheers, Gary
Date: 8/18/2015 2:26:00 PM
Excellent, Gary. A thoughtful tribute. I saw this yesterday and loved it. Since then, I've been working on two double dactyls and I hope you'll stop by to take a look. They're difficult little pieces to put together: despite that they're so short. You made it look too easy. That's why... I think I've bitten off more than I can chew. *Seven* for this! Thank you. - Dan
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Gary Bateman
Date: 8/19/2015 3:06:00 PM
Hello Dan, One DD I can do on someone that I have much "disregard" for is his imperial majesty "Vladimir Vladimirovich Putin." I used to be a Soviet Specialist many years ago when I was a U.S. Army Officer in the intelligence field. I had a specialization in the Russian language and culture as well. And so, I see if I can whip up a DD write good old "Vlad." And you should check out two poems I posted on Putin: "King Vlad" and "King Vlad Redux -- The Second Cold War." These reflect very much my personal and professional view of him as a cold-blooded bully and dictator. I'll be in touch. Best, Gary
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Accipter Salix
Date: 8/19/2015 11:43:00 AM
I submitted my first attempts at double dactyls last night. I chose a person from history that I revere, and a person from history that I fear. The former is called, An Indelible Impression, and the latter is called, A Terrible Influence. In my opinion, the first one was much more successful.
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Accipter Salix
Date: 8/19/2015 11:43:00 AM
I know what you mean about the humorous ones sounding borderline stupid. If I have to read the words, Higgledy piggledy, one more time, I might start pulling hair out. These are certainly fun to put together though: much like drafting a crossword puzzle for somebody else to solve: economy counts, and everything has to fit ‘just so.’
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Accipter Salix
Date: 8/19/2015 11:42:00 AM
Thanks, Gary. I’ve checked out your Keats, Shelley, Byron, Paraclesus, Goethe (which I have a few questions about, if you have some time later) Alfred Prufrock and Ezra Pound double dactyls. They were very helpful to me and I can’t wait to read more. However, I’d like to see one from you that deals with historical person that you dislike, despise or otherwise find a little annoying: just for variety. ;)
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Gary Bateman
Date: 8/19/2015 11:19:00 AM
Dan, I read your note again here. I will drop by to read your double dactyls this PM. I live here in Germany. I will do more of these too over time. I enjoy the challenge of putting them together. I find the more serious topics read better and the ones that are supposed humorous are, at times, borderline stupid!! Enjoy -- and Keep Writing!! Cheers and Best, Gary
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Gary Bateman
Date: 8/19/2015 11:15:00 AM
Hello Dan!! Thanks for your great comments here and for the "Seven." I've written a number of these double dactyls and enjoy them. (Recommend you check my other dactyl writes out for form and variety. Perhaps these will help you as you create your double dactyl!! Look forward to reading yours!!) The Double Dactyl is historically supposed to be humorous, however, I've used it in a more literary sense toward famous poets (and one on Paracelsus--the alchemist). The 2nd verse, 2nd stanza is supposed to be one six- syllable word. Hyphenated words are acceptable. The syllabication is always the challenge, and may not always be 100% achievable. Cheers, Gary
Date: 8/17/2015 2:04:00 PM
Your poem my friend , Gary, what lacks in length makes it up in quality! A real gem! A seven for certain, mon ami, Gary, merci!
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Gary Bateman
Date: 8/17/2015 3:44:00 PM
Herr Professor!! Ich bedanke mich sehr fuer deinen Besuch und fuer deinen Kommentar!! And thanks for the "7" -- it is most appreciated!! The Double Dactyl writes force one (because of the expected format), to choose one's words and phrases very wisely. It pleases me greatly that you enjoyed this particular and special poetic write. Cheers and Best, Gary
Date: 8/17/2015 10:33:00 AM
Short, but worthy of praise is this poem of yours, Gary. Keats is one of my favourite poets, and I still can quote from memory many excerpts from his works, especially Lamia. #7 // paul
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Gary Bateman
Date: 8/17/2015 3:49:00 PM
Thanks so much Paul and thanks for the "7" too!! Same with me: Keats is an all-time favorite and I always include Shelley and Byron into this mix to serve up the undeniable trilogy of talent among these three very memorable romantic poets. I'm very pleased you liked my dactyl write here. Cheers and Best Wishes, Gary