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Famous Lizard Poems by Famous Poets

These are examples of famous Lizard poems written by some of the greatest and most-well-known modern and classical poets. PoetrySoup is a great educational poetry resource of famous lizard poems. These examples illustrate what a famous lizard poem looks like and its form, scheme, or style (where appropriate).

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by Frost, Robert
...To think to know the country and now know
The hillside on the day the sun lets go
Ten million silver lizards out of snow!
As often as I've seen it done before
I can't pretend to tell the way it's done.
It looks as if some magic of the sun
Lifted the rug that bred them on the floor
And the light breaking on them made them run.
But if I though to stop the wet stampede,
And caught one silver lizard by the tail,
And put my foot on one without avail,
And...Read more of this...



by Shelley, Percy Bysshe
...son's bier;
The amorous birds now pair in every brake,
And build their mossy homes in field and brere;
And the green lizard, and the golden snake,
Like unimprisoned flames, out of their trance awake.

Through wood and stream and field and hill and Ocean
A quickening life from the Earth's heart has burst
As it has ever done, with change and motion,
From the great morning of the world when first
God dawned on Chaos; in its stream immersed,
The lamps of Heaven fla...Read more of this...

by Robinson, Edwin Arlington
...cy of custom 
That saw not even itself. When I came in, 
Often I’d find him strewn along my couch
Like an amorphous lizard with its clothes on, 
Reading a book and waiting for its dinner. 
His clothes were always odiously in order, 
Yet I should not have thought of him as clean— 
Not even if he had washed himself to death
Proving it. There was nothing right about him. 
Then he would search, never quite satisfied, 
Though always in a measure confident, 
My eyes...Read more of this...

by Lawson, Henry
...and there! 
Dull, dumb flats and stony "rises," where the bullocks sweat and bake, 
And the sinister "gohanna," and the lizard, and the snake. 
Land of day and night -- no morning freshness, and no afternoon, 
For the great, white sun in rising brings with him the heat of noon. 
Dismal country for the exile, when the shades begin to fall 
From the sad, heart-breaking sunset, to the new-chum, worst of all. 

Dreary land in rainy weather, with the endless clouds tha...Read more of this...

by Wilde, Oscar
...ffodil
With tiny fretful spear, or from its lair
The waking stag had leapt across the rill
And roused the ouzel, or the lizard crept
Athwart the sunny rock, beneath the grass their bodies slept.

And when day brake, within that silver shrine
Fed by the flames of cressets tremulous,
Queen Venus knelt and prayed to Proserpine
That she whose beauty made Death amorous
Should beg a guerdon from her pallid Lord,
And let Desire pass across dread Charon's icy ford.


III


In...Read more of this...



by Browning, Elizabeth Barrett
...night 
While my new rest went on, went on.

XIV

From gracious Nature have I won
Such liberal bounty? may I run
So, lizard-like, within her side, 
And there be safe, who now am tried 
By days that painfully go on?

XV

—A Voice reproves me thereupon,
More sweet than Nature's when the drone
Of bees is sweetest, and more deep
Than when the rivers overleap
The shuddering pines, and thunder on.

XVI

God's Voice, not Nature's! Night and noon
He sits upon the great white t...Read more of this...

by Tennyson, Alfred Lord
...in
The scarlet shafts of sunrise--but no sail. 

There often as he watch'd or seem'd to watch,
So still, the golden lizard on him paused,
A phantom made of many phantoms moved
Before him haunting him, or he himself
Moved haunting people, things and places, known
Far in a darker isle beyond the line;
The babes, their babble, Annie, the small house,
The climbing street, the mill, the leafy lanes,
The peacock-yewtree and the lonely Hall,
The horse he drove, the boat he sold,...Read more of this...

by Shelley, Percy Bysshe
...free 
Thou wilt scoff at pain. 10 
Spirit false! thou hast forgot 
All but those who need thee not. 

As a lizard with the shade 
Of a trembling leaf  
Thou with sorrow art dismay'd; 15 
Even the sighs of grief 
Reproach thee that thou art not near  
And reproach thou wilt not hear. 

Let me set my mournful ditty 
To a merry measure; 20 
Thou wilt never come for pity  
Thou wilt come for pleasure: 
Pity then will cut away 
Those cruel wings and th...Read more of this...

by Emanuel, James A
...hite cotton bales.

Knee-bone, thigh, hip-bone.
Jazz slips you percussion bone
classified "unknown."

Slick lizard rhythms,
cigar-smoke tunes, straight-gin sky
laced with double moons.

Second-chance rhythms,
don't-give-up riffs: jazz gets HIGH
off can'ts, buts, and ifs....Read more of this...

by Smart, Christopher
...the Lord, who ballances craft against strength and skill against number. 

Let Moses, the Man of God, bless with a Lizard, in the sweet majesty of good-nature, and the magnanimity of meekness. 

Let Joshua praise God with an Unicorn -- the swiftness of the Lord, and the strength of the Lord, and the spear of the Lord mighty in battle. 

Let Caleb with an Ounce praise the Lord of the Land of beauty and rejoice in the blessing of his good Report. 

Let Othniel ...Read more of this...

by Smart, Christopher
...ice with Fern of Trees -- Lord stave off evil this day. 

Let Clare, house of Clare rejoice with Galeotes a kind of Lizard at enmity with serpents. Lord receive the soul of Dr Wilcox Master of Clare Hall. 

Let Wilmot, house of Wilmot rejoice with Epipetros an herb coming up spontaneous (of the seed of the earth) but never flowers. 

Let Anstey, house of Anstey rejoice with Eumeces a kind of balm. Lord have mercy on Christopher Anstey and his kinswoman.Read more of this...

by Moore, Marianne
...its hippopotamus --
nose and mouth combined
in one magnificent hopper,
"the crested screamer --
that huge bird almost a lizard,"
its snake and the potent apple.
He tells us
that "for love
that will gaze an eagle blind,
that is like a Hercules
climbing the trees
in the garden of the Hesperides,
from forty-five to seventy
is the best age,"
commending it
as a fine art, as an experiment,
a duty or as merely recreation.
One must not call him ruffian
nor friction a calamity...Read more of this...

by Silverstein, Shel
...been carelessly hung on the door.
His books are all jammed in the closet,
His vest has been left in the hall.
A lizard named Ed is asleep in his bed,
And his smelly old sock has been stuck to the wall.
Whosever room this is should be ashamed!
Donald or Robert or Willie or--
Huh? You say it's mine? Oh, dear,
I knew it looked familiar!...Read more of this...

by Lowell, Amy
...,
With a purple cup."
But Sister Clotilde said nothing at all,
She looked up and down the old grey wall
To see if a lizard were basking there.
She looked across the garden to where
A sycamore
Flanked the garden door.
She was restless, although her little feet danced,
And quite unsatisfied, for it chanced
Her morning's work had hung in her mind
And would not take form. She could not find
The beautifulness
For the Virgin's dress.
Should it be of pink, or dam...Read more of this...

by Poe, Edgar Allan
...ch lolled, 
Glides, spectre-like, unto his marble home, 
Lit by the wan light of the horned moon, 
The swift and silent lizard of the stones! 

But stay! these walls- these ivy-clad arcades- 
These moldering plinths- these sad and blackened shafts- 
These vague entablatures- this crumbling frieze- 
These shattered cornices- this wreck- this ruin- 
These stones- alas! these grey stones- are they all- 
All of the famed, and the colossal left 
By the corrosive Hours to Fate and ...Read more of this...

by Kipling, Rudyard
...as flown.

"I have wrenched it free from the halliard to hang for a wisp on the Horn;
I have chased it north to the Lizard -- ribboned and rolled and torn;
I have spread its fold o'er the dying, adrift in a hopeless sea;
I have hurled it swift on the slaver, and seen the slave set free.

"My basking sunfish know it, and wheeling albatross,
Where the lone wave fills with fire beneath the Southern Cross.
What is the Flag of England? Ye have but my reefs to dare,
Ye ...Read more of this...

by Bridges, Robert Seymour
...birds are silent with despair
Within the thickets; nor their armour thin
Will gaudy flies adventure in the air,
Nor any lizard sun his spotted skin. 

25
Nothing is joy without thee: I can find
No rapture in the first relays of spring,
In songs of birds, in young buds opening,
Nothing inspiriting and nothing kind;
For lack of thee, who once wert throned behind
All beauty, like a strength where graces cling,--
The jewel and heart of light, which everything
Wrestled in riva...Read more of this...

by Khayyam, Omar
...
How Sultan after Sultan with his Pomp
Abode his Hour or two and went his way. 

XIX.
They say the Lion and the Lizard keep
The Courts where Jamshyd gloried and drank deep:
And Bahram, that great Hunter -- the Wild Ass
Stamps o'er his Head, but cannot break his Sleep. 

XX.
I sometimes think that never blows so red
The Rose as where some buried Caesar bled;
That every Hyacinth the Garden wears
Dropt in its Lap from some once lovely Head. 

XXI.
And thi...Read more of this...

by Fitzgerald, Edward
...Day,
How Sultan after Sultan with his Pomp
Abode his Hour or two, and went his way.

17

They say the Lion and the Lizard keep
The Courts where Jamshyd gloried and drank deep;
And Bahram, that great Hunter—the Wild Ass
Stamps o'er his Head, and he lies fast asleep.

18

I sometimes think that never blows so red
The Rose as where some buried Caesar bled;
That every Hyacinth the Garden wears
Dropt in its Lap from some once lovely Head.

19

And this delightful Herb...Read more of this...

by Tennyson, Alfred Lord
...he land. 

May never saw dismember thee, 
Nor wielded axe disjoint, 
That art the fairest-spoken tree 
From here to Lizard-point. 

O rock upon thy towery-top 
All throats that gurgle sweet! 
All starry culmination drop 
Balm-dews to bathe thy feet! 

All grass of silky feather grow--- 
And while he sinks or swells 
The full south-breeze around thee blow 
The sound of minster bells. 

The fat earth feed thy branchy root, 
That under deeply strikes! 
The northern m...Read more of this...

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Book: Shattered Sighs