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Best Famous Taunted Poems

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Written by Robert William Service | Create an image from this poem

The Ghosts

 Smith, great writer of stories, drank; found it immortalized his pen;
Fused in his brain-pan, else a blank, heavens of glory now and then;
Gave him the magical genius touch; God-given power to gouge out, fling
Flat in your face a soul-thought -- Bing!
Twiddle your heart-strings in his clutch.
"Bah!" said Smith, "let my body lie stripped to the buff in swinish shame, If I can blaze in the radiant sky out of adoring stars my name.
Sober am I nonentitized; drunk am I more than half a god.
Well, let the flesh be sacrificed; spirit shall speak and shame the clod.
Who would not gladly, gladly give Life to do one thing that will live?" Smith had a friend, we'll call him Brown; dearer than brothers were those two.
When in the wassail Smith would drown, Brown would rescue and pull him through.
When Brown was needful Smith would lend; so it fell as the years went by, Each on the other would depend: then at the last Smith came to die.
There Brown sat in the sick man's room, still as a stone in his despair; Smith bent on him his eyes of doom, shook back his lion mane of hair; Said: "Is there one in my chosen line, writer of forthright tales my peer? Look in that little desk of mine; there is a package, bring it here.
Story of stories, gem of all; essence and triumph, key and clue; Tale of a loving woman's fall; soul swept hell-ward, and God! it's true.
I was the man -- Oh, yes, I've paid, paid with mighty and mordant pain.
Look! here's the masterpiece I've made out of my sin, my manhood slain.
Art supreme! yet the world would stare, know my mistress and blaze my shame.
I have a wife and daughter -- there! take it and thrust it in the flame.
" Brown answered: "Master, you have dipped pen in your heart, your phrases sear.
Ruthless, unflinching, you have stripped naked your soul and set it here.
Have I not loved you well and true? See! between us the shadows drift; This bit of blood and tears means You -- oh, let me have it, a parting gift.
Sacred I'll hold it, a trust divine; sacred your honour, her dark despair; Never shall it see printed line: here, by the living God I swear.
" Brown on a Bible laid his hand; Smith, great writer of stories, sighed: "Comrade, I trust you, and understand.
Keep my secret!" And so he died.
Smith was buried -- up soared his sales; lured you his books in every store; Exquisite, whimsy, heart-wrung tales; men devoured them and craved for more.
So when it slyly got about Brown had a posthumous manuscript, Jones, the publisher, sought him out, into his pocket deep he dipped.
"A thousand dollars?" Brown shook his head.
"The story is not for sale, " he said.
Jones went away, then others came.
Tempted and taunted, Brown was true.
Guarded at friendship's shrine the fame of the unpublished story grew and grew.
It's a long, long lane that has no end, but some lanes end in the Potter's field; Smith to Brown had been more than friend: patron, protector, spur and shield.
Poor, loving-wistful, dreamy Brown, long and lean, with a smile askew, Friendless he wandered up and down, gaunt as a wolf, as hungry too.
Brown with his lilt of saucy rhyme, Brown with his tilt of tender mirth Garretless in the gloom and grime, singing his glad, mad songs of earth: So at last with a faith divine, down and down to the Hunger-line.
There as he stood in a woeful plight, tears a-freeze on his sharp cheek-bones, Who should chance to behold his plight, but the publisher, the plethoric Jones; Peered at him for a little while, held out a bill: "NOW, will you sell?" Brown scanned it with his twisted smile: "A thousand dollars! you go to hell!" Brown enrolled in the homeless host, sleeping anywhere, anywhen; Suffered, strove, became a ghost, slave of the lamp for other men; For What's-his-name and So-and-so in the abyss his soul he stripped, Yet in his want, his worst of woe, held he fast to the manuscript.
Then one day as he chewed his pen, half in hunger and half despair, Creaked the door of his garret den; Dick, his brother, was standing there.
Down on the pallet bed he sank, ashen his face, his voice a wail: "Save me, brother! I've robbed the bank; to-morrow it's ruin, capture, gaol.
Yet there's a chance: I could to-day pay back the money, save our name; You have a manuscript, they say, worth a thousand -- think, man! the shame.
.
.
.
" Brown with his heart pain-pierced the while, with his stern, starved face, and his lips stone-pale, Shuddered and smiled his twisted smile: "Brother, I guess you go to gaol.
" While poor Brown in the leer of dawn wrestled with God for the sacred fire, Came there a woman weak and wan, out of the mob, the murk, the mire; Frail as a reed, a fellow ghost, weary with woe, with sorrowing; Two pale souls in the legion lost; lo! Love bent with a tender wing, Taught them a joy so deep, so true, it seemed that the whole-world fabric shook, Thrilled and dissolved in radiant dew; then Brown made him a golden book, Full of the faith that Life is good, that the earth is a dream divinely fair, Lauding his gem of womanhood in many a lyric rich and rare; Took it to Jones, who shook his head: "I will consider it," he said.
While he considered, Brown's wife lay clutched in the tentacles of pain; Then came the doctor, grave and grey; spoke of decline, of nervous strain; Hinted Egypt, the South of France -- Brown with terror was tiger-gripped.
Where was the money? What the chance? Pitiful God! .
.
.
the manuscript! A thousand dollars! his only hope! he gazed and gazed at the garret wall.
.
.
.
Reached at last for the envelope, turned to his wife and told her all.
Told of his friend, his promise true; told like his very heart would break: "Oh, my dearest! what shall I do? shall I not sell it for your sake?" Ghostlike she lay, as still as doom; turned to the wall her weary head; Icy-cold in the pallid gloom, silent as death .
.
.
at last she said: "Do! my husband? Keep your vow! Guard his secret and let me die.
.
.
.
Oh, my dear, I must tell you now -- the women he loved and wronged was I; Darling! I haven't long to live: I never told you -- forgive, forgive!" For a long, long time Brown did not speak; sat bleak-browed in the wretched room; Slowly a tear stole down his cheek, and he kissed her hand in the dismal gloom.
To break his oath, to brand her shame; his well-loved friend, his worshipped wife; To keep his vow, to save her name, yet at the cost of what? Her life! A moment's space did he hesitate, a moment of pain and dread and doubt, Then he broke the seals, and, stern as fate, unfolded the sheets and spread them out.
.
.
.
On his knees by her side he limply sank, peering amazed -- each page was blank.
(For oh, the supremest of our art are the stories we do not dare to tell, Locked in the silence of the heart, for the awful records of Heav'n and Hell.
) Yet those two in the silence there, seemed less weariful than before.
Hark! a step on the garret stair, a postman knocks at the flimsy door.
"Registered letter!" Brown thrills with fear; opens, and reads, then bends above: "Glorious tidings! Egypt, dear! The book is accepted -- life and love.
"


Written by Ralph Waldo Emerson | Create an image from this poem

Ode to W. H. Channing

Though loath to grieve
The evil time's sole patriot,
I cannot leave
My honied thought
For the priest's cant,
Or statesman's rant.
If I refuse My study for their politique, Which at the best is trick, The angry Muse Puts confusion in my brain.
But who is he that prates Of the culture of mankind, Of better arts and life? Go, blindworm, go, Behold the famous States Harrying Mexico With rifle and with knife! Or who, with accent bolder, Dare praise the freedom-loving mountaineer? I found by thee, O rushing Contoocook! And in thy valleys, Agiochook! The jackals of the negro-holder.
The God who made New Hampshire Taunted the lofty land With little men;-- Small bat and wren House in the oak:-- If earth-fire cleave The upheaved land, and bury the folk, The southern crocodile would grieve.
Virtue palters; Right is hence; Freedom praised, but hid; Funeral eloquence Rattles the coffin-lid.
What boots thy zeal, O glowing friend, That would indignant rend The northland from the south? Wherefore? to what good end? Boston Bay and Bunker Hill Would serve things still;-- Things are of the snake.
The horseman serves the horse, The neatherd serves the neat, The merchant serves the purse, The eater serves his meat; 'T is the day of the chattel, Web to weave, and corn to grind; Things are in the saddle, And ride mankind.
There are two laws discrete, Not reconciled,-- Law for man, and law for thing; The last builds town and fleet, But it runs wild, And doth the man unking.
'T is fit the forest fall, The steep be graded, The mountain tunnelled, The sand shaded, The orchard planted, The glebe tilled, The prairie granted, The steamer built.
Let man serve law for man; Live for friendship, live for love, For truth's and harmony's behoof; The state may follow how it can, As Olympus follows Jove.
Yet do not I implore The wrinkled shopman to my sounding woods, Nor bid the unwilling senator Ask votes of thrushes in the solitudes.
Every one to his chosen work;-- Foolish hands may mix and mar; Wise and sure the issues are.
Round they roll till dark is light, Sex to sex, and even to odd;-- The over-god Who marries Right to Might, Who peoples, unpeoples,-- He who exterminates Races by stronger races, Black by white faces,-- Knows to bring honey Out of the lion; Grafts gentlest scion On pirate and Turk.
The Cossack eats Poland, Like stolen fruit; Her last noble is ruined, Her last poet mute: Straight, into double band The victors divide; Half for freedom strike and stand;-- The astonished Muse finds thousands at her side.
Written by Edgar Lee Masters | Create an image from this poem

Lilian Stewart

 I was the daughter of Lambert Hutchins,
Born in a cottage near the grist-mill,
Reared in the mansion there on the hill,
With its spires, bay-windows, and roof of slate.
How proud my mother was of the mansion! How proud of father's rise in the world! And how my father loved and watched us, And guarded our happiness.
But I believe the house was a curse, For father's fortune was little beside it; And when my husband found he had married A girl who was really poor, He taunted me with the spires, And called the house a fraud on the world, A treacherous lure to young men, raising hopes Of a dowry not to be had; And a man while selling his vote Should get enough from the people's betrayal To wall the whole of his family in.
He vexed my life till I went back home And lived like an old maid till I died, Keeping house for father.
Written by Ralph Waldo Emerson | Create an image from this poem

Ode To William H. Channing

 Though loth to grieve
The evil time's sole patriot,
I cannot leave
My buried thought
For the priest's cant,
Or statesman's rant.
If I refuse My study for their politique, Which at the best is trick, The angry muse Puts confusion in my brain.
But who is he that prates Of the culture of mankind, Of better arts and life? Go, blind worm, go, Behold the famous States Harrying Mexico With rifle and with knife.
Or who, with accent bolder, Dare praise the freedom-loving mountaineer, I found by thee, O rushing Contoocook! And in thy valleys, Agiochook! The jackals of the negro-holder.
The God who made New Hampshire Taunted the lofty land With little men.
Small bat and wren House in the oak.
If earth fire cleave The upheaved land, and bury the folk, The southern crocodile would grieve.
Virtue palters, right is hence, Freedom praised but hid; Funeral eloquence Rattles the coffin-lid.
What boots thy zeal, O glowing friend, That would indignant rend The northland from the south? Wherefore? To what good end? Boston Bay and Bunker Hill Would serve things still: Things are of the snake.
The horseman serves the horse, The neat-herd serves the neat, The merchant serves the purse, The eater serves his meat; 'Tis the day of the chattel, Web to weave, and corn to grind, Things are in the saddle, And ride mankind.
There are two laws discrete Not reconciled, Law for man, and law for thing; The last builds town and fleet, But it runs wild, And doth the man unking.
'Tis fit the forest fall, The steep be graded, The mountain tunnelled, The land shaded, The orchard planted, The globe tilled, The prairie planted, The steamer built.
Live for friendship, live for love, For truth's and harmony's behoof; The state may follow how it can, As Olympus follows Jove.
Yet do not I implore The wrinkled shopman to my sounding woods, Nor bid the unwilling senator Ask votes of thrushes in the solitudes.
Every one to his chosen work.
Foolish hands may mix and mar, Wise and sure the issues are.
Round they roll, till dark is light, Sex to sex, and even to odd; The over-God, Who marries Right to Might, Who peoples, unpeoples, He who exterminates Races by stronger races, Black by white faces, Knows to bring honey Out of the lion, Grafts gentlest scion On Pirate and Turk.
The Cossack eats Poland, Like stolen fruit; Her last noble is ruined, Her last poet mute; Straight into double band The victors divide, Half for freedom strike and stand, The astonished muse finds thousands at her side.
Written by Mary Darby Robinson | Create an image from this poem

The Trumpeter an Old English Tale

 It was in the days of a gay British King
(In the old fashion'd custom of merry-making)
The Palace of Woodstock with revels did ring,
While they sang and carous'd--one and all:
For the monarch a plentiful treasury had,
And his Courtiers were pleas'd, and no visage was sad,
And the knavish and foolish with drinking were mad,
While they sat in the Banquetting hall.
Some talk'd of their Valour, and some of their Race, And vaunted, till vaunting was black in the face; Some bragg'd for a title, and some for a place, And, like braggarts, they bragg'd one and all! Some spoke of their scars in the Holy Crusade, Some boasted the banner of Fame they display'd, And some sang their Loves in the soft serenade As they sat in the Banquetting hall.
And here sat a Baron, and there sat a Knight, And here stood a Page in his habit all bright, And here a young Soldier in armour bedight With a Friar carous'd, one and all.
Some play'd on the dulcimer, some on the lute, And some, who had nothing to talk of, were mute, Till the Morning, awakened, put on her grey suit-- And the Lark hover'd over the Hall.
It was in a vast gothic Hall that they sate, And the Tables were cover'd with rich gilded plate, And the King and his minions were toping in state, Till their noddles turn'd round, one and all:-- And the Sun through the tall painted windows 'gan peep, And the Vassals were sleeping, or longing to sleep, Though the Courtiers, still waking, their revels did keep, While the minstrels play'd sweet, in the Hall.
And, now in their Cups, the bold topers began To call for more wine, from the cellar yeoman, And, while each one replenish'd his goblet or can, The Monarch thus spake to them all: "It is fit that the nobles do just what they please, "That the Great live in idleness, riot, and ease, "And that those should be favor'd, who mark my decrees, "And should feast in the Banquetting Hall.
"It is fit," said the Monarch, "that riches should claim "A passport to freedom, to honor, and fame,-- "That the poor should be humble, obedient, and tame, "And, in silence, submit--one and all.
"That the wise and the holy should toil for the Great, "That the Vassals should tend at the tables of state, "That the Pilgrim should--pray for our souls at the gate "While we feast in our Banquetting Hall.
"That the low-lineag'd CARLES should be scantily fed-- "That their drink should be small, and still smaller their bread; "That their wives and their daughters to ruin be led, "And submit to our will, one and all ! "It is fit, that whoever I choose to defend-- "Shall be courted, and feasted, and lov'd as a friend, "While before them the good and enlighten'd shall bend, "While they sit in the Banquetting Hall.
" Now the Topers grew bold, and each talk'd of his right, One would fain be a Baron, another a Knight; And another, (because at the Tournament fight He had vanquished his foes, one and all) Demanded a track of rich lands; and rich fare; And of stout serving Vassals a plentiful share; With a lasting exemption from penance and pray'r And a throne in the Banquetting Hall.
But ONE, who had neither been valiant nor wise, With a tone of importance, thus vauntingly cries, "My Leige he knows how a good subject to prize-- "And I therefore demand--before all-- "I this Castle possess: and the right to maintain "Five hundred stout Bowmen to follow my train, "And as many strong Vassals to guard my domain "As the Lord of the Banquetting Hall! "I have fought with all nations, and bled in the field, "See my lance is unshiver'd, tho' batter'd my shield, "I have combatted legions, yet never would yield "And the Enemy fled--one and all ! "I have rescued a thousand fair Donnas, in Spain, "I have left in gay France, every bosom in pain.
"I have conquer'd the Russian, the Prussian, the Dane, "And will reign in the Banquetting Hall!" The Monarch now rose, with majestical look, And his sword from the scabbard of Jewels he took, And the Castle with laughter and ribaldry shook.
While the braggart accosted thus he: "I will give thee a place that will suit thy demand, "What to thee, is more fitting than Vassals or Land-- "I will give thee,--what justice and valour command, "For a TRUMPETER bold--thou shalt be!" Now the revellers rose, and began to complain-- While they menanc'd with gestures, and frown'd with disdain, And declar'd, that the nobles were fitter to reign Than a Prince so unruly as He.
But the Monarch cried, sternly, they taunted him so, "From this moment the counsel of fools I forego-- "And on Wisdom and Virtue will honors bestow "For such, ONLY, are welcome to Me!" So saying, he quitted the Banquetting Hall, And leaving his Courtiers and flatterers all-- Straightway for his Confessor loudly 'gan call "O ! Father ! now listen !" said he: "I have feasted the Fool, I have pamper'd the Knave, "I have scoff'd at the wise, and neglected the brave-- "And here, Holy Man, Absolution I crave-- "For a penitent now I will be.
" From that moment the Monarch grew sober and good, (And nestled with Birds of a different brood,) For he found that the pathway which wisdom pursu'd Was pleasant, safe, quiet, and even ! That by Temperance, Virtue and liberal deeds, By nursing the flowrets, and crushing the weeds, The loftiest Traveller always succeeds-- For his journey will lead him to HEAV'N.


Written by Amy Lowell | Create an image from this poem

Nightmare: A Tale for an Autumn Evening

 After a Print by George Cruikshank

It was a gusty night,
With the wind booming, and swooping,
Looping round corners,
Sliding over the cobble-stones,
Whipping and veering,
And careering over the roofs
Like a thousand clattering horses.
Mr.
Spruggins had been dining in the city, Mr.
Spruggins was none too steady in his gait, And the wind played ball with Mr.
Spruggins And laughed as it whistled past him.
It rolled him along the street, With his little feet pit-a-patting on the flags of the sidewalk, And his muffler and his coat-tails blown straight out behind him.
It bumped him against area railings, And chuckled in his ear when he said "Ouch!" Sometimes it lifted him clear off his little patting feet And bore him in triumph over three grey flagstones and a quarter.
The moon dodged in and out of clouds, winking.
It was all very unpleasant for Mr.
Spruggins, And when the wind flung him hard against his own front door It was a relief, Although the breath was quite knocked out of him.
The gas-lamp in front of the house flared up, And the keyhole was as big as a barn door; The gas-lamp flickered away to a sputtering blue star, And the keyhole went out with it.
Such a stabbing, and jabbing, And sticking, and picking, And poking, and pushing, and prying With that key; And there is no denying that Mr.
Spruggins rapped out an oath or two, Rub-a-dub-dubbing them out to a real snare-drum roll.
But the door opened at last, And Mr.
Spruggins blew through it into his own hall And slammed the door to so hard That the knocker banged five times before it stopped.
Mr.
Spruggins struck a light and lit a candle, And all the time the moon winked at him through the window.
"Why couldn't you find the keyhole, Spruggins?" Taunted the wind.
"I can find the keyhole.
" And the wind, thin as a wire, Darted in and seized the candle flame And knocked it over to one side And pummelled it down -- down -- down --! But Mr.
Spruggins held the candle so close that it singed his chin, And ran and stumbled up the stairs in a surprisingly agile manner, For the wind through the keyhole kept saying, "Spruggins! Spruggins!" behind him.
The fire in his bedroom burned brightly.
The room with its crimson bed and window curtains Was as red and glowing as a carbuncle.
It was still and warm.
There was no wind here, for the windows were fastened; And no moon, For the curtains were drawn.
The candle flame stood up like a pointed pear In a wide brass dish.
Mr.
Spruggins sighed with content; He was safe at home.
The fire glowed -- red and yellow roses In the black basket of the grate -- And the bed with its crimson hangings Seemed a great peony, Wide open and placid.
Mr.
Spruggins slipped off his top-coat and his muffler.
He slipped off his bottle-green coat And his flowered waistcoat.
He put on a flannel dressing-gown, And tied a peaked night-cap under his chin.
He wound his large gold watch And placed it under his pillow.
Then he tiptoed over to the window and pulled back the curtain.
There was the moon dodging in and out of the clouds; But behind him was his quiet candle.
There was the wind whisking along the street.
The window rattled, but it was fastened.
Did the wind say, "Spruggins"? All Mr.
Spruggins heard was "S-s-s-s-s --" Dying away down the street.
He dropped the curtain and got into bed.
Martha had been in the last thing with the warming-pan; The bed was warm, And Mr.
Spruggins sank into feathers, With the familiar ticking of his watch just under his head.
Mr.
Spruggins dozed.
He had forgotten to put out the candle, But it did not make much difference as the fire was so bright .
.
.
Too bright! The red and yellow roses pricked his eyelids, They scorched him back to consciousness.
He tried to shift his position; He could not move.
Something weighed him down, He could not breathe.
He was gasping, Pinned down and suffocating.
He opened his eyes.
The curtains of the window were flung back, The fire and the candle were out, And the room was filled with green moonlight.
And pressed against the window-pane Was a wide, round face, Winking -- winking -- Solemnly dropping one eyelid after the other.
Tick -- tock -- went the watch under his pillow, Wink -- wink -- went the face at the window.
It was not the fire roses which had pricked him, It was the winking eyes.
Mr.
Spruggins tried to bounce up; He could not, because -- His heart flapped up into his mouth And fell back dead.
On his chest was a fat pink pig, On the pig a blackamoor With a ten pound weight for a cap.
His mustachios kept curling up and down like angry snakes, And his eyes rolled round and round, With the pupils coming into sight, and disappearing, And appearing again on the other side.
The holsters at his saddle-bow were two port bottles, And a curved table-knife hung at his belt for a scimitar, While a fork and a keg of spirits were strapped to the saddle behind.
He dug his spurs into the pig, Which trampled and snorted, And stamped its cloven feet deeper into Mr.
Spruggins.
Then the green light on the floor began to undulate.
It heaved and hollowed, It rose like a tide, Sea-green, Full of claws and scales And wriggles.
The air above his bed began to move; It weighed over him In a mass of draggled feathers.
Not one lifted to stir the air.
They drooped and dripped With a smell of port wine and brandy, Closing down, slowly, Trickling drops on the bed-quilt.
Suddenly the window fell in with a great scatter of glass, And the moon burst into the room, Sizzling -- "S-s-s-s-s -- Spruggins! Spruggins!" It rolled toward him, A green ball of flame, With two eyes in the center, A red eye and a yellow eye, Dropping their lids slowly, One after the other.
Mr.
Spruggins tried to scream, But the blackamoor Leapt off his pig With a cry, Drew his scimitar, And plunged it into Mr.
Spruggins's mouth.
Mr.
Spruggins got up in the cold dawn And remade the fire.
Then he crept back to bed By the light which seeped in under the window curtains, And lay there, shivering, While the bells of St.
George the Martyr chimed the quarter after seven.
Written by Robert William Service | Create an image from this poem

Hot Digitty Dog

 Hot digitty dog! Now, ain't it *****,
I've been abroad for over a year;
Seen a helluva lot since then,
Killed, I reckon, a dozen men;
Six was doubtful, but six was sure,
Three in Normandy, three in the Ruhr.
Four I got with a hand grenade, Two I shot in a midnight raid: Oh, I ain't sorry, except perhaps To think that my jerries wasn't japs.
Hot digitty dog! Now ain't it tough; I oughta be handed hero stuff - Bands and banquets, and flags and flowers, Speeches, peaches, confetti showers; "Welcome back to the old home town, Colour Sargent Josephus Brown.
Fought like a tiger, one of our best, Medals and ribands on his chest.
cheers for a warrior, fresh from the fight .
.
.
" Sure I'd 'a got 'em - - had I been white.
Hot digitty dog! It's jist too bad, Gittin' home an' nobody gald; Sneakin' into the Owl Drug Store Nobody knowin' me any more; Admirin' my uniform fine and fit - Say, I've certainly changed a bit From the lanky lad who used to croon To a battered banjo in Shay's Saloon; From the no-good ****** who runned away After stickin' his knife into ol' man Shay.
They's a lynched me, for he was white, But he raped my sister one Sunday night; So I did what a proper man should do, And I sunk his body deep in the slough.
Oh, he taunted me to my dark disgrace, Called me a ******, spat in my face; So I buried my jack-knife in his heart, Laughin' to see the hot blood start; Laughin' still, though it's long ago, And nobody's ever a-gonna know.
Nobody's ever a-gonna tell How Ol' Man Shay went straight to hell; nobody's gonna make me confess - And what is a killin' more or less.
My skin may be black, but by Christ! I fight; I've slain a dozen, and each was white, And none of 'em ever did me no harm, And my conscience is clear - I've no alarm; So I'll go where I sank Ol' Man Shay in the bog, And spit in the water .
.
.
Hot digitty dog!
Written by Walt Whitman | Create an image from this poem

Chanting the Square Deific

 1
CHANTING the square deific, out of the One advancing, out of the sides; 
Out of the old and new—out of the square entirely divine, 
Solid, four-sided, (all the sides needed).
.
.
from this side JEHOVAH am I, Old Brahm I, and I Saturnius am; Not Time affects me—I am Time, old, modern as any; Unpersuadable, relentless, executing righteous judgments; As the Earth, the Father, the brown old Kronos, with laws, Aged beyond computation—yet ever new—ever with those mighty laws rolling, Relentless, I forgive no man—whoever sins, dies—I will have that man’s life; Therefore let none expect mercy—Have the seasons, gravitation, the appointed days, mercy?—No more have I; But as the seasons, and gravitation—and as all the appointed days, that forgive not, I dispense from this side judgments inexorable, without the least remorse.
2 Consolator most mild, the promis’d one advancing, With gentle hand extended—the mightier God am I, Foretold by prophets and poets, in their most rapt prophecies and poems; From this side, lo! the Lord CHRIST gazes—lo! Hermes I—lo! mine is Hercules’ face; All sorrow, labor, suffering, I, tallying it, absorb in myself; Many times have I been rejected, taunted, put in prison, and crucified—and many times shall be again; All the world have I given up for my dear brothers’ and sisters’ sake—for the soul’s sake; Wending my way through the homes of men, rich or poor, with the kiss of affection; For I am affection—I am the cheer-bringing God, with hope, and all-enclosing Charity; (Conqueror yet—for before me all the armies and soldiers of the earth shall yet bow—and all the weapons of war become impotent:) With indulgent words, as to children—with fresh and sane words, mine only; Young and strong I pass, knowing well I am destin’d myself to an early death: But my Charity has no death—my Wisdom dies not, neither early nor late, And my sweet Love, bequeath’d here and elsewhere, never dies.
3 Aloof, dissatisfied, plotting revolt, Comrade of criminals, brother of slaves, Crafty, despised, a drudge, ignorant, With sudra face and worn brow, black, but in the depths of my heart, proud as any; Lifted, now and always, against whoever, scorning, assumes to rule me; Morose, full of guile, full of reminiscences, brooding, with many wiles, (Though it was thought I was baffled and dispell’d, and my wiles done—but that will never be;) Defiant, I, SATAN, still live—still utter words—in new lands duly appearing, (and old ones also;) Permanent here, from my side, warlike, equal with any, real as any, Nor time, nor change, shall ever change me or my words.
4 Santa SPIRITA, breather, life, Beyond the light, lighter than light, Beyond the flames of hell—joyous, leaping easily above hell; Beyond Paradise—perfumed solely with mine own perfume; Including all life on earth—touching, including God—including Saviour and Satan; Ethereal, pervading all, (for without me, what were all? what were God?) Essence of forms—life of the real identities, permanent, positive, (namely the unseen,) Life of the great round world, the sun and stars, and of man—I, the general Soul, Here the square finishing, the solid, I the most solid, Breathe my breath also through these songs.
Written by Emily Dickinson | Create an image from this poem

This Merit hath the worst --

 This Merit hath the worst --
It cannot be again --
When Fate hath taunted last
And thrown Her furthest Stone --

The Maimed may pause, and breathe,
And glance securely round --
The Deer attracts no further
Than it resists -- the Hound --