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Poetic Encryption Like Ancient Egyptian

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Author's Notes: "Poetic Encryption Like Ancient Egyptian" is a new narrative poem that I had completed on April 25, 2016. I took a "deep dive" when I put this one together to better understand how certain forms of "poetic encryption" are, at times, at the root of how each of us choose to write the poetry that we do. The storyline and intellectual backdrop of this particular poem touches on my thematic view of how poets, at times, employ forms of written encryption in their poetry based on certain methodologies that they may choose to follow. To amply illustrate my point here, I cite examples from T. S. Eliot, Sylvia Plath, Ezra Pound, and John Keats. Many famous poets from the past (as well as the present) revel in a type of a "self-tribal coding" that I refer to in my poetic narrative. The notion I'm getting at here is that many poets, at times, will embellish arcane and sometimes uncanny forms of symbolism and imagery to highlight the special message of their poem to the reader while making their rationalization and argument to be as persuasive as possible. And, I'm not implying that this is necessarily bad. This "self-tribal coding" aspect that I allude to in this poem, is something that I believe that all of us as interested poets and writers, at times, use as we write our verses and construct the stanzas and overall thematic flow in our poems. I truly believe that this is an indelible aspect of poetic expression which truly set us apart from the straight-forward, at times, boring narrative work of journalists and other writers. We are either "Poetic" in our respective thematic outlooks, or we're not! In effect, I truly feel that "Word Pictures," per se, carefully developed and articulated by poets can produce a type of symbolic imagery that can be somewhat analogous and likened to a form of ancient hieroglyphics, which, through their own depicted imagery, form a coherent meaning via "Word Pictures." My intent with this poem is to challenge how each of us actually think as we formulate and develop the various types of poems we choose to write and present to the reader. Pursuing the "difficult" and "unpredictable" in narrative expression, I believe, helps each of us to mature as poets in our further mastery of the fine art of poetic articulation and expression. This is something I believe is quite interesting to think about! Enjoy! (Gary Bateman - May 8, 2016) (Narrative) 

Categories: allegory, analogy, emotions, imagination, metaphor, passion, and symbolism.

 

Poetic Encryption Like Ancient Egyptian This terror and threat to poetic clarity, Becomes a pet rock for some poets. Words do count for sure, but so does Clarity unless poets put a mask on. Encryption can be used to mask Certain vatic pretensions that poets Harbor, at times, when waxing eloquently About some trendy theme or some idea Or notion deemed as avant-garde. If hieroglyphics were to be readily used In our now advanced world of modernity, Would they be viewed as: A rifacimento? A renaissance? A code? It all could be plain nonsense too! Or maybe not . . . In T. S. Eliot’s, “The Love Song of J. Alfred Prufrock,” He enchants and captivates his readers to a rare and Flavorful taste of vers libre, if one might be so bold, That is selectively sparing, and yet, well-calibrated, With intermittent sprinklings of superbly crafted Visual imagery and eloquent tonal alliteration— And varied meter, rhythm, and rhyme. “Prufrock” is palpable with emotion and metaphor, yet— Detached from a ready explanation of the delicious Power of the words with which Eliot mesmerizes his Readers with the devout cleverness of a Pied Piper. One could see the eternal Footman And hear his snicker—and be afraid; One could roll one’s trousers; One could dare to eat a peach; One could walk upon the beach; One could hear the mermaids sing; But will the mermaids sing to him? Only Eliot really truly knows . . . The real Prufrockian mien here. Are not such metaphors there . . . To make us think? To enchant our senses? To play on our fears? To be emotive? And, yes . . . To tantalize our passions? And, yes . . . To excite our psychic yearnings? Yes . . . Contemplation is always vital! Some poets speak in a self-tribal code. Sometimes artful obfuscation is the real goal, And sometimes—maybe not. A cacophonic scramble of Demonstrative and passionate Words, thoughts, emotions. All so pure and all so real, And all in the poet’s mind! All so exact and all so real! Some, like the legendary Sylvia Plath, Bring the reader to a forlorn world of Lost faith, utter despair, and loneliness In the midst of such a sad dream world. Plath’s lyric poem — “Edge” Summons readers to the brink; Occurring one week before her Untimely suicide. The power and symbolism Resident in this, her final poem, Point toward . . . A perfection, A completion, A tragic tribalism. Plath’s symbology is both Intense and compelling; Forming its own sense of Encryption while embellishing A supernatural aura of immortality. The redoubtable Ezra Pound in his “Hugh Selwyn Mauberley,” and in Many other of his complex poems, Personifies a certain form of encryption With his use of symbols and metaphors, A mix of foreign languages, and a definite Convulsion of syntax which makes for an Intellectual “Rite of Passage” defying, at times, A clear analysis and ready understanding. Pound in “Mauberley,” writes on various Levels begging much pre-knowledge from Each reader while amply teasing us with: His gnomic predilection for novel themes; His thirst for the unexpected and unusual; His formidable knowledge and language forte; His array of uniquely woven word tapestries; And his referential flair for striking aphorisms. Pound does all of this so magnificently . . . All the while forming imagery challenging A reader’s sense of understanding: Leaving a sense of syntactical encryption Writ Large! Always challenging and never ever dull! That is, if one’s cup of tea is reveling in the complex! There is a profound literary sense to what some may say Is Pound’s Janus-faced proclivity for genius and madness. Pound will not disappoint you regardless of which bipolar Face you ascribe to him. Although, contrast and comparison are very important . . . Yet, I proffer that deep thinking and sometimes actually Being confused at times . . . May result ultimately in a true epiphany, Leading each of us to a spirit of greater understanding! I end with John Keats, who has left all of us, as poets, With his immeasurable sense of naturalistic Humanism. Keats’ pursuit of metaphor, nuance, descriptive imagery, And sagacious symbology reflect the highest degree of Poetic mastery and a strong sense of perspicacity obvious In all of his works! Keats also uses a type of poetic encryption— With his diction, imagery, thoughts, and verse syncopation; He’s quite elegant with his varied and fluent thematic reveries. They’re always a joy to decipher, whilst leaving us to bask in Their powerful sense of clarity and persuasive meaning! Many of Keats’ works reflect this form of encryption . . . “La Belle Dame Sans Merci” Particularly comes to mind in this instance, As well as his famous “Ode” narratives; And his superb Grecian epic fragment: “The Fall of Hyperion,” Presents the reader with a veritable smorgasbord of contrasts And imagery, and an imaginative view of the classical conflict Between the Olympians and the Titans! Divining the complex, chaotic, and unpredictable In our world of arcane symbolism and imagery, Reflect the modern world we live in today. Poetic Encryption is indeed . . . So like Ancient Egyptian! Hieroglyphics, after all, form their own Sense of imagery and word pictures . . . Analogous to what we do today with the Words, images, metaphors, emotions, and Symbols in our poetry! Poetic Encryption is so like Ancient Egyptian! Amen! Amen! Amen! Gary Bateman, Copyright © All Rights Reserved, April 25, 2016 (Narrative)

Copyright © | Year Posted 2016




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Date: 4/15/2018 10:59:00 AM
Your in-depth narrative is amazing and awesome Gary. I agree that the use of 'self tribal coding' (love that term btw) does make poetic works more interesting and lustrous in their ingenious word pairing and artistic impact, even if obscure. Trying to create new ways of expression, I think, does lead more creative poets down this path, but, I don't always want to have to work so hard (delving deep beneath the surface) to figure out the meaning, but practicing such reading does offer freedom and growth. Warmest wishes always, my friend. ~Susan
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Susan Ashley
Date: 4/15/2018 12:45:00 PM
Dear Gary, I appreciate your recommendation for me to read your deep and well executed poem, as I see it as a stepping stone of learning in my poetic journey. Thank you for your encouragement and support of my creative endeavors, dear friend.. I truly enjoyed your wondrous poem.
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Gary Bateman
Date: 4/15/2018 11:41:00 AM
Hello Dear Susan!! I am glad you were able to finally take a read of this special narrative of mine on poetic encryption. I wrote this one as a reflection on how I view aspects of poetic encryption which I've termed as "STC" -- self-tribal coding. This one is really meant for poets who are true purists of the poetic art. This means it will scare off the more novice poet, but at some level later all poets will confront forms of this difficulty as they really study classical poetry. Best Always, Gary
Date: 5/14/2016 3:49:00 PM
Now that's what I call writing Gary very skillfully put together pal wishing you both a joyous weekend dear friend sorry I am not around much these days
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Gary Bateman
Date: 5/14/2016 7:49:00 PM
Thanks Liam Mate!! This one did indeed take some thought. But all of the work and effort paid off with this one. Th,is narrative does cover some very significant ground in winnowing down the arcane processes of poetic encryption -- a quite worthy effort for sure!! Cheers and Best, Gary
Date: 5/8/2016 4:39:00 PM
Ouch, I could be found guilty of 'Poetic Encryption", I suppose.:( I might find it privately challenging, I do so love personifications.:) It is like being given a large wad of clay, and shaping it into something entirely new. Keep well, oh you are such a deeply clever soul, Mikki
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Gary Bateman
Date: 5/8/2016 6:27:00 PM
Hello Mikki!! Thanks so much for your read and great observations here!! Over time, I believe that I'm guilty too of a certain degree of poetic encryption. Most poets over time master that certain uncanny ability to shade things by nuance, imagery, tone, syntax and certain words -- among many other tools. And then, there's the pre-knowledge of some peculiar classics or other languages that poets like Ezra Pond revel in as they dazzle the readers with their formidable skills and talents. I really like your analogy of "a large wad of clay" with the shaping process. Bravo!! I agree with you totally. Thanks and Best Wishes, Gary
Date: 5/8/2016 1:10:00 PM
- I know you put a lot of effort into everything you write, this is no exception dear Gary - a sensational writing, a "huge" poem in both length and word - but very interesting and skillfully written - Wise thoughts and facts that you have added - hugs // Anne-Lise :)
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Gary Bateman
Date: 5/8/2016 6:07:00 PM
Thanks Anne-Lise!! Yup!! This one was a very special effort for me. I always learn something when I undertake a big theme project as I did with this write. I very pleased that you found it of interest. There will always be a certain flavor and degree of mystery in some poetry depending on the intention and plan of the poetry. This make everything all the more interesting. Best Always . . . Gary!!
Date: 5/8/2016 12:30:00 PM
Some more encrypted--and able to be decrypted--than others. Some beautiful even when, or because of, obscurity...metaphor is the language of dreams, of underlying realities not obvious to the linear mind.
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Gary Bateman
Date: 5/8/2016 12:55:00 PM
Thanks Tom for your read here and for your most observant and mindful comments!! Another poet, who can be quite challenging and who I did not mention in this poem, is: Stephane Mallarme -- a famous 19th century French poet. His poetry is extraordinary and quite challenging. He was read widely too by T. S. Eliot and Ezra Pound. Thanks Again -- and Best Wishes, Gary
Date: 5/8/2016 12:28:00 PM
Hi there G!:)A very beautiful n' excellent poem, you've painted here my dear friend Gary.Just awesome! Very beautifully written in this amazing Narrative piece.Wow!Just outstanding!Well done,G!Enjoyed it!Golden pen!A 7 +!A fav.Sending my love n' prayers to you and Ingrid as always.Just take good care of each other now.All the best to you always,G! Spill the ink!:)Wishing you a very lovely day!In His light God bless you always!:)D
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Gary Bateman
Date: 5/8/2016 1:00:00 PM
Thanks as always Dear One "D"!! I'm glad you liked this one. This one took some time, but all of my work and research paid off for sure. Some poems, for sure, aren't always what they appear to be. That's why I always say that people who are new to poetry and just getting started, need to READ!! READ!! READ!! And not just contemporary poetry. Classics and ancient works are very key too!! Thanks too for the "TR/FAV"!! Best Wishes from Ingrid and me!! "G" SPILL INK!!