Short Poetry by Popular Famous Poets

 Poet
1 William Wordsworth
2 Oscar Wilde
3 William Shakespeare
4 Emily Dickinson
5 Maya Angelou
6 Rabindranath Tagore
7 Robert Frost
8 Langston Hughes
9 Walt Whitman
10 Shel Silverstein
11 William Blake
12 Sylvia Plath
13 Pablo Neruda
14 Alfred Lord Tennyson
15 Rudyard Kipling
16 Edward Estlin (E E) Cummings
17 William Butler Yeats
18 Tupac Shakur
19 Sandra Cisneros
20 Alice Walker
21 Charles Bukowski
22 Henry Wadsworth Longfellow
23 Muhammad Ali
24 Sarojini Naidu
25 Christina Rossetti
26 Billy Collins
27 Carol Ann Duffy
28 Edgar Allan Poe
29 John Donne
30 John Keats
31 Nikki Giovanni
32 Ralph Waldo Emerson
33 Raymond Carver
34 Thomas Hardy
35 Ogden Nash
36 Lewis Carroll
37 Mark Twain
38 Spike Milligan
39 Anne Sexton
40 Carl Sandburg
41 Elizabeth Barrett Browning
42 Alexander Pushkin
43 Henry David Thoreau
44 Percy Bysshe Shelley
45 Victor Hugo
46 George (Lord) Byron
47 Roger McGough
48 Gary Soto
49 Sara Teasdale
50 Thunchaththu Ramanujan Ezhuthachan

Famous Short Night Poems

Famous Short Night Poems. Short Night Poetry by Famous Poets. A collection of the all-time best Night short poems

Other Short Poem Pages

Night | Short Famous Poems and Poets

12
 
by Kobayashi Issa

Blossoms at night

 Blossoms at night,
and the faces of people
moved by music.


by Kobayashi Issa

Summer night

 Summer night--
even the stars
are whispering to each other.


by Matsuo Basho

Awake at night

 Awake at night--
the sound of the water jar
 cracking in the cold.


by Matsuo Basho

Cold night: the wild duck

 Cold night: the wild duck,
sick, falls from the sky
 and sleeps awhile.


by Matsuo Basho

A cool fall night

 At a hermitage:

 A cool fall night--
getting dinner, we peeled
 eggplants, cucumbers.


by Robert Herrick

DREAMS

 Here we are all, by day; by night we're hurl'd
By dreams, each one into a several world.


by Emily Dickinson

Morning is due to all --

 Morning is due to all --
To some -- the Night --
To an imperial few --
The Auroral light.


by Carl Sandburg

Window

 Night from a railroad car window
Is a great, dark, soft thing
Broken across with slashes of light.


by Emily Dickinson

Within thy Grave!

 Within thy Grave!
Oh no, but on some other flight --
Thou only camest to mankind
To rend it with Good night --


by Robert Herrick

A VOW TO VENUS

 Happily I had a sight
Of my dearest dear last night;
Make her this day smile on me,
And I'll roses give to thee!


by Hilaire Belloc

The Scorpion

 The Scorpion is as black as soot,
He dearly loves to bite;
He is a most unpleasant brute
To find in bed at night.


by Emily Dickinson

Peace is a fiction of our Faith --

 Peace is a fiction of our Faith --
The Bells a Winter Night
Bearing the Neighbor out of Sound
That never did alight.


by Edna St Vincent Millay

First Fig

 My candle burns at both ends;
It will not last the night;
But ah, my foes, and oh, my friends ­
It gives a lovely light!


by Emily Dickinson

His Heart was darker than the starless night

 His Heart was darker than the starless night
For that there is a morn
But in this black Receptacle
Can be no Bode of Dawn


by Edna St Vincent Millay

First Fig

 My candle burns at both ends;
It will not last the night;
But ah, my foes, and oh, my friends—
It gives a lovely light.


by Emily Dickinson

Rest at Night

 Rest at Night
The Sun from shining,
Nature -- and some Men --
Rest at Noon -- some Men --
While Nature
And the Sun -- go on --


by Emily Dickinson

Let my first Knowing be of thee

 Let my first Knowing be of thee
With morning's warming Light --
And my first Fearing, lest Unknowns
Engulf thee in the night --


by Carl Sandburg

Whitelight

 YOUR whitelight flashes the frost to-night
Moon of the purple and silent west.
Remember me one of your lovers of dreams.


by Emily Dickinson

Each that we lose takes part of us;

 Each that we lose takes part of us;
A crescent still abides,
Which like the moon, some turbid night,
Is summoned by the tides.


by Emily Dickinson

No Passenger was known to flee --

 No Passenger was known to flee --
That lodged a night in memory --
That wily -- subterranean Inn
Contrives that none go out again --


by William Morris

Night

 I am Night: I bring again
Hope of pleasure, rest from pain:
Thoughts unsaid 'twixt Life and Death
My fruitful silence quickeneth.


by Edward Lear

J was a jug

J

was a jug,
So pretty and white,
With fresh water in it
At morning and night.

j!

Nice little jug!


by Edward Lear

U was an urn

U

was an urn
All polished and bright,
And full of hot water
At noon and at night.

u

Useful old urn!


by Matthew Prior

A True Maid

 No, no; for my virginity,
When I lose that, says Rose, I'll die:
Behind the elms last night, cried Dick,
Rose, were you not extremely sick?


by Ben Jonson

On Old Colt


XXXIX.
 ? ON OLD COLT.
  
For all night-sins, with other wives unknown,
COLT now doth daily penance in his own.


12