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Best Famous My Bad Poems

Here is a collection of the all-time best famous My Bad poems. This is a select list of the best famous My Bad poetry. Reading, writing, and enjoying famous My Bad poetry (as well as classical and contemporary poems) is a great past time. These top poems are the best examples of my bad poems.

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Written by William Shakespeare | Create an image from this poem

Sonnet 112: Your love and pity doth th impression fill

 Your love and pity doth th' impression fill
Which vulgar scandal stamped upon my brow;
For what care I who calls me well or ill,
So you o'ergreen my bad, my good allow?
You are my all the world, and I must strive
To know my shames and praises from your tongue;
None else to me, nor I to none alive,
That my steeled sense or changes, right or wrong.
In so profound abysm I throw all care Of others' voices that my adder's sense To critic and to flatterer stoppèd are.
Mark how with my neglect I do dispense.
You are so strongly in my purpose bred, That all the world besides, methinks, are dead.


Written by William Shakespeare | Create an image from this poem

Sonnet 144: Two loves I have of comfort and despair

 Two loves I have, of comfort and despair,
Which like two spirits do suggest me still:
The better angel is a man right fair,
The worser spirit a woman coloured ill.
To win me soon to hell, my female evil Tempteth my better angel from my side, And would corrupt my saint to be a devil, Wooing his purity with her foul pride.
And whether that my angel be turned fiend, Suspect I may, yet not directly tell; But being both from me both to each friend, I guess one angel in another's hell.
Yet this shall I ne'er know, but live in doubt, Till my bad angel fire my good one out.
Written by William Shakespeare | Create an image from this poem

Sonnet CXII

 Your love and pity doth the impression fill
Which vulgar scandal stamp'd upon my brow;
For what care I who calls me well or ill,
So you o'er-green my bad, my good allow?
You are my all the world, and I must strive
To know my shames and praises from your tongue:
None else to me, nor I to none alive,
That my steel'd sense or changes right or wrong.
In so profound abysm I throw all care Of others' voices, that my adder's sense To critic and to flatterer stopped are.
Mark how with my neglect I do dispense: You are so strongly in my purpose bred That all the world besides methinks are dead.
Written by William Shakespeare | Create an image from this poem

Sonnet CXLIV

 Two loves I have of comfort and despair,
Which like two spirits do suggest me still:
The better angel is a man right fair,
The worser spirit a woman colour'd ill.
To win me soon to hell, my female evil Tempteth my better angel from my side, And would corrupt my saint to be a devil, Wooing his purity with her foul pride.
And whether that my angel be turn'd fiend Suspect I may, but not directly tell; But being both from me, both to each friend, I guess one angel in another's hell: Yet this shall I ne'er know, but live in doubt, Till my bad angel fire my good one out.