Get Your Premium Membership

Flowers

 I will not have the mad Clytie,
Whose head is turned by the sun;
The tulip is a courtly queen,
Whom, therefore, I will shun;
The cowslip is a country wench,
The violet is a nun; -
But I will woo the dainty rose,
The queen of everyone.
The pea is but a wanton witch, In too much haste to wed, And clasps her rings on every hand The wolfsbane I should dread; - Nor will I dreary rosemary That always mourns the dead; - But I will woo the dainty rose, With her cheeks of tender red.
The lily is all in white, like a saint, And so is no mate for me - And the daisy's cheek is tipped with blush, She is of such low degree; Jasmine is sweet, and has many loves, And the broom's betrothed to the bee; - But I will plight with the dainty rose, For fairest of all is she.

Poem by Thomas Hood
Biography | Poems | Best Poems | Short Poems | Quotes | Email Poem - FlowersEmail Poem | Create an image from this poem

Poems are below...



More Poems by Thomas Hood

Comments, Analysis, and Meaning on Flowers

Provide your analysis, explanation, meaning, interpretation, and comments on the poem Flowers here.

Commenting turned off, sorry.