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ABLAZE - Part Five

[Continued from Part Four] The question might be asked, when it all had come to pass and the children were delivered from the blaze en masse, if the father’s behavior seems artfully contrived, in enticing his offspring—who subsequently thrived— with numerous playthings, toys and carts, so they would run away from the burning house… then giving them just one single ox cart only, after all was said and done? The point is that he was not attempting to impress the children with his vast array of riches, much less to appear more exalted or intimidate them— no, his aim was decidedly to liberate them. He endowed them with a perfect vehicle, for real. And they were not injured in that harrowing ordeal. Yet the house symbolizes our living-dying realm, with the troublesome worries that tend to overwhelm us humans; but rather than trying to escape it, with Nam Myoho Renge Kyo, we wholly reshape it. The fire of desire, instead of bringing pain, through this sole theme and title, accesses the terrain of our deep Dharma nature, which is one and the same as the whereabouts of the elder’s mansion, aflame. So, to give this ancient parable a modern feel— nowadays, the never-ending truth it can reveal is that those who follow Nichiren will come to know, by constantly reciting Nam Myoho Renge Kyo, that they’ve entered the ox cart that’s wonderfully great and arrived on true enlightenment’s path as their fate! ~ Harley White < September 21, 2014 > [Inspiration for the poem ~ (Buddhist) Parable of the Burning House which can be found in the Third Chapter of the Dharma Flower Sutra (aka, Lotus Sutra)]

Copyright © | Year Posted 2015




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Date: 10/7/2015 1:42:00 AM
It is not clear to me if the point is to escape it or reshape it???? As for the write, it was an excellent ride and I hope no one quit before getting to the enlightening part of 5. (I'm thinking it is only me that wonders about escape vs. reshape because I'm currently tired, and I do hope you'll tell me). Very Good, Harley ... CayCay
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Harley White
Date: 10/7/2015 9:41:00 AM
(Please start at the bottom, reading my reply. Again, I had to divide my comment into 3 parts, which I hadn’t anticipated.) Take another look at the last 3 stanzas and see if you are still confused about this. Also, at the website – dharmagateway.org – that I referred to above, there is a wealth of information.
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Harley White
Date: 10/7/2015 9:37:00 AM
The question you ask here at the end is a very good one, which goes right to the heart of the meaning of the parable, as well as addressing the difference between the provisional Buddhist teachings and the true essential teaching. Hopefully, the last three stanzas of the poem answer your question.
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Harley White
Date: 10/7/2015 9:35:00 AM
CayCay, thank you for your delightful comments throughout your reading of the poem! I am truly pleased and gratified that you continued all the way to the conclusion of it. When I started posting the poem, I had no idea that I would have to divide it into five parts. But once I began, I had to keep going. Seeing your comments have made the efforts feel worthwhile.
Date: 10/6/2015 10:10:00 AM
Due to the length limitations of Poetry Soup, I had to post this poem in 5 parts. If anyone has made it this far, you have now reached the end. Thank you!
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Date: 10/6/2015 9:20:00 AM
This can be seen at the link for... dharmagateway.org... then at the link for... 'Dharma Flower Sutra'... then at the link for... '3rd Chapter on Similes and Parables'...
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Date: 10/6/2015 9:17:00 AM
This parable is found in Chapter Three of the Dharma Flower Sutra. Below is a passage of the commentary by Nichiren, from The Dharma Flower Sutra Seen through the Oral Transmission of Nichiren Daishonin - Translated by Martin Bradley.
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