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Famous Subjected Poems by Famous Poets

These are examples of famous Subjected poems written by some of the greatest and most-well-known modern and classical poets. PoetrySoup is a great educational poetry resource of famous subjected poems. These examples illustrate what a famous subjected poem looks like and its form, scheme, or style (where appropriate).

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by Spenser, Edmund
...h which she rules the house of God on high,
And manageth the ever-moving sky,
And in the same these lower creatures all
Subjected to her power imperial.

Both heaven and earth obey unto her will,
And all the creatures which they both contain;
For of her fullness which the world doth fill
They all partake, and do in state remain
As their great Maker did at first ordain,
Through observation of her high behest,
By which they first were made, and still increast.

The fair...Read More



by Pope, Alexander
...middle natures, how they long to join,
Yet never pass th' insuperable line!
Without this just gradation, could they be
Subjected, these to those, or all to thee?
The pow'rs of all subdu'd by thee alone,
Is not thy reason all these pow'rs in one?VIII. 


See, through this air, this ocean, and this earth,
All matter quick, and bursting into birth.
Above, how high, progressive life may go!
Around, how wide! how deep extend below!
Vast chain of being, which from God bega...Read More

by Spenser, Edmund
...h which she rules the house of God on high,
And manageth the ever-moving sky,
And in the same these lower creatures all
Subjected to her power imperial.

Both heaven and earth obey unto her will,
And all the creatures which they both contain;
For of her fullness which the world doth fill
They all partake, and do in state remain
As their great Maker did at first ordain,
Through observation of her high behest,
By which they first were made, and still increast.

The fair...Read More

by Pope, Alexander
...natures,(25) how they long to join, 
Yet never pass th' insuperable line! 
Without this just gradation, could they be 
Subjected these to those, or all to thee? 
The pow'rs of all subdu'd by thee alone, 
Is not thy Reason all these pow'rs in one?

VIII. See, thro' this air, this ocean, and this earth, 
All matter quick, and bursting into birth. 
Above, how high progressive life may go! 
Around, how wide! how deep extend below! 
Vast chain of being, which from God beg...Read More

by Shelley, Percy Bysshe
...
This lovely child, blithe, innocent and free;
She spends a happy time with little care,
While we to such sick thoughts subjected are
As came on you last night. It is our will
That thus enchains us to permitted ill.
We might be otherwise. We might be all
We dream of happy, high, majestical.
Where is the love, beauty, and truth we seek
But in our mind? and if we were not weak
Should we be less in deed than in desire?"
"Ay, if we were not weak--and we aspire
How...Read More



by Milton, John
...d; Man he made, and for him built 
Magnificent this world, and earth his seat, 
Him lord pronounced; and, O indignity! 
Subjected to his service angel-wings, 
And flaming ministers to watch and tend 
Their earthly charge: Of these the vigilance 
I dread; and, to elude, thus wrapt in mist 
Of midnight vapour glide obscure, and pry 
In every bush and brake, where hap may find 
The serpent sleeping; in whose mazy folds 
To hide me, and the dark intent I bring. 
O foul descen...Read More

by Milton, John
...ening Angel caught 
Our lingering parents, and to the eastern gate 
Led them direct, and down the cliff as fast 
To the subjected plain; then disappeared. 
They, looking back, all the eastern side beheld 
Of Paradise, so late their happy seat, 
Waved over by that flaming brand; the gate 
With dreadful faces thronged, and fiery arms: 
Some natural tears they dropt, but wiped them soon; 
The world was all before them, where to choose 
Their place of rest, and Providence the...Read More

by Cowper, William
...here he might view the boundless sky, 
And all those glorious lights on high; 
With flying meteors, mists and show'rs, 
Subjected hills, trees, meads and flow'rs; 
And ev'ry minute bless the King 
And wise Creator of each thing. 
I ask not why he did remove 
To happy Mamre's holy grove, 
Leaving the cities of the plain 
To Lot and his successless train? 
All various lusts in cities still 
Are found; they are the thrones of ill; 
The dismal sinks, where blood is spill'd, 
...Read More

by Milton, John
...nemies, where ever chanc'd,
I us'd hostility, and took thir spoil
To pay my underminers in thir coin.
My Nation was subjected to your Lords.
It was the force of Conquest; force with force
Is well ejected when the Conquer'd can.
But I a private person, whom my Countrey
As a league-breaker gave up bound, presum'd
Single Rebellion and did Hostile Acts. 
I was no private but a person rais'd
With strength sufficient and command from Heav'n
To free my Countrey; if t...Read More

by Whitman, Walt
...Soul, and of
 immortality. 

I will make a song for These States, that no-one State may under any
 circumstances be subjected to another State; 
And I will make a song that there shall be comity by day and by night between
 all The States, and between any two of them: 
And I will make a song for the ears of the President, full of weapons with
 menacing points,
And behind the weapons countless dissatisfied faces: 
—And a song make I, of the One form’d out of all; 
The fang...Read More

by Carroll, Lewis
...Why is it that Poetry has never yet been subjected to that process of Dilution which has proved so advantageous to her sister-art Music? The Diluter gives us first a few notes of some well-known Air, then a dozen bars of his own, then a few more notes of the Air, and so on alternately: thus saving the listener, if not from all risk of recognising the melody at all, at least from the too-exciting tr...Read More

by Chaucer, Geoffrey
...rgatory. Old paintings and illuminations
represent the dead as torn by hooks, roasted in fires, boiled in
pots, and subjected to many other physical torments.

4. Qui cum patre: "Who with the father"; the closing words of
the final benediction pronounced at Mass.

5. Askaunce: The word now means sideways or asquint; here it
means "as if;" and its force is probably to suggest that the
second friar, with an ostentatious stealthiness, noted down the
names of ...Read More

by Tennyson, Alfred Lord
...with mortal hates and loves,
And moves unseen among the ways of men.
Then, in my wanderings all the lands that lie
Subjected to the Heliconian ridge
Have heard this footstep fall, altho' my wont
Was more to scale the highest of the heights
With some strange hope to see the nearer God.
One naked peak‹the sister of the Sun
Would climb from out the dark, and linger there 


To silver all the valleys with her shafts‹
There once, but long ago, five-fold thy term
Of years,...Read More

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