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Famous Sovran Poems by Famous Poets

These are examples of famous Sovran poems written by some of the greatest and most-well-known modern and classical poets. PoetrySoup is a great educational poetry resource of famous sovran poems. These examples illustrate what a famous sovran poem looks like and its form, scheme, or style (where appropriate).

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by Robinson, Edwin Arlington
...n which event
He's peevish of a morning. He seems old;
He's not the proper stomach or the sleep -- 
And they're two sovran agents to conserve him
Against the fiery art that has no mercy
But what's in that prodigious grand new House.
I gather something happening in his boyhood
Fulfilled him with a boy's determination
To make all Stratford 'ware of him. Well, well,
I hope at last he'll have his joy of it,
And all his pigs and sheep and bellowing beeves,
And frogs an...Read More



by Milton, John
...eats the forlorn and wandering passenger;
And here their tender age might suffer peril,
But that, by quick command from sovran Jove,
I was despatched for their defence and guard:
And listen why; for I will tell you now
What never yet was heard in tale or song,
From old or modern bard, in hall or bower.
 Bacchus, that first from out the purple grape
Crushed the sweet poison of misused wine,
After the Tuscan mariners transformed,
Coasting the Tyrrhene shore, as the winds li...Read More

by Browning, Elizabeth Barrett
...whose days go on.

XVIII

He reigns below, He reigns alone, 
And, having life in love forgone 
Beneath the crown of sovran thorns, 
He reigns the Jealous God. Who mourns 
Or rules with Him, while days go on?

XIX

By anguish which made pale the sun, 
I hear Him charge his saints that none 
Among his creatures anywhere 
Blaspheme against Him with despair, 
However darkly days go on.

XX

Take from my head the thorn-wreath brown!
No mortal grief deserves that crown....Read More

by Hugo, Victor
...h, his death yields thee not higher delight! 
 But, ah! the mother's heart with woe for ever wild, 
 This heart whose sovran bliss brought forth so bitter birth— 
 This world as vast as thou, even thou, O sorrowless Earth, 
 Is desolate and void because of this one child! 
 
 NELSON K. TYERMAN. 


 




...Read More

by Milton, John
...lood, 
 The Trumpet spake not to the armed throng, 
And Kings sate still with awfull eye, 
As if they surely knew their sovran Lord was by. 

But peacefull was the night 
Wherin the Prince of light 
 His raign of peace upon the earth began: 
The Windes with wonder whist, 
Smoothly the waters kist, 
 Whispering new joyes to the milde Ocean, 
Who now hath quite forgot to rave, 
While Birds of Calm sit brooding on the charmeed wave. 

The Stars with deep amaze 
Stand fix...Read More



by Keats, John
...silent face:
Knowledge enormous makes a God of me.
Names, deeds, gray legends, dire events, rebellions,
Majesties, sovran voices, agonies,
Creations and destroyings, all at once
Pour into the wide hollows of my brain,
And deify me, as if some blithe wine
Or bright elixir peerless I had drunk,
And so become immortal."---Thus the God,
While his enkindled eyes, with level glance
Beneath his white soft temples, steadfast kept
Trembling with light upon Mnemosyne.
Soon...Read More

by Emerson, Ralph Waldo
...lf,
The social quintessence of self.
Well, said I, he is hypocrite,
And folly the end of his subtle wit,
He takes a sovran privilege
Not allowed to any liege,
For he does go behind all law,
And right into himself does draw,
For he is sovranly allied.
Heaven's oldest blood flows in his side,
And interchangeably at one
With every king on every throne,
That no God dare say him nay,
Or see the fault, or seen betray;
He has the Muses by the heart,
And the Parcæ all are of ...Read More

by Milton, John
...y Muse to venture down 
The dark descent, and up to reascend, 
Though hard and rare: thee I revisit safe, 
And feel thy sovran vital Lamp; but thou 
Revisit'st not these eyes, that rowle in vain 
To find thy piercing ray, and find no dawn; 
So thick a drop serene hath quencht thir Orbs, 
Or dim suffusion veild. Yet not the more 
Cease I to wander where the Muses haunt 
Cleer Spring, or shadie Grove, or Sunnie Hill, 
Smit with the love of sacred song; but chief 
Thee Sion ...Read More

by Keats, John
...e nigh  
Turning to poison while the bee-mouth sips: 
Ay in the very temple of Delight 25 
Veil'd Melancholy has her sovran shrine  
Though seen of none save him whose strenuous tongue 
Can burst Joy's grape against his palate fine; 
His soul shall taste the sadness of her might  
And be among her cloudy trophies hung. 30 ...Read More

by Browning, Elizabeth Barrett
...oating up to crowd
The sense with beauty. He with forehead bowed
And humble-lidded eyes, as one inclined
Before the sovran thought of his own mind,
And very meek with inspirations proud,
Takes here his rightful place as poet-priest
By the high altar, singing prayer and prayer

To the higher Heavens. A noble vision free
Our Haydon's hand has flung out from the mist:
No portrait this, with Academic air !
This is the poet and his poetry....Read More

by Milton, John
...Muse to venture down 
The dark descent, and up to re-ascend, 
Though hard and rare: Thee I revisit safe, 
And feel thy sovran vital lamp; but thou 
Revisit'st not these eyes, that roll in vain 
To find thy piercing ray, and find no dawn; 
So thick a drop serene hath quench'd their orbs, 
Or dim suffusion veil'd. Yet not the more 
Cease I to wander, where the Muses haunt, 
Clear spring, or shady grove, or sunny hill, 
Smit with the love of sacred song; but chief 
Thee, Si...Read More

by Milton, John
...to Heaven. 
Thus talking, hand in hand alone they passed 
On to their blissful bower: it was a place 
Chosen by the sovran Planter, when he framed 
All things to Man's delightful use; the roof 
Of thickest covert was inwoven shade 
Laurel and myrtle, and what higher grew 
Of firm and fragrant leaf; on either side 
Acanthus, and each odorous bushy shrub, 
Fenced up the verdant wall; each beauteous flower, 
Iris all hues, roses, and jessamin, 
Reared high their flourished h...Read More

by Milton, John
...road; till, at the gate 
Of Heaven arrived, the gate self-opened wide 
On golden hinges turning, as by work 
Divine the sovran Architect had framed. 
From hence no cloud, or, to obstruct his sight, 
Star interposed, however small he sees, 
Not unconformed to other shining globes, 
Earth, and the garden of God, with cedars crowned 
Above all hills. As when by night the glass 
Of Galileo, less assured, observes 
Imagined lands and regions in the moon: 
Or pilot, from am...Read More

by Milton, John
...of punishment, the gulf 
Of Tartarus, which ready opens wide 
His fiery Chaos to receive their fall. 
So spake the Sovran Voice, and clouds began 
To darken all the hill, and smoke to roll 
In dusky wreaths, reluctant flames, the sign 
Of wrath awaked; nor with less dread the loud 
Ethereal trumpet from on high 'gan blow: 
At which command the Powers militant, 
That stood for Heaven, in mighty quadrate joined 
Of union irresistible, moved on 
In silence their bright legi...Read More

by Milton, John
...e infinitely Good we owe 
Immortal thanks, and his admonishment 
Receive, with solemn purpose to observe 
Immutably his sovran will, the end 
Of what we are. But since thou hast vouchsafed 
Gently, for our instruction, to impart 
Things above earthly thought, which yet concerned 
Our knowing, as to highest wisdom seemed, 
Deign to descend now lower, and relate 
What may no less perhaps avail us known, 
How first began this Heaven which we behold 
Distant so high, with mov...Read More

by Milton, John
...t have mixed. 
Not that they durst without his leave attempt; 
But us he sends upon his high behests 
For state, as Sovran King; and to inure 
Our prompt obedience. Fast we found, fast shut, 
The dismal gates, and barricadoed strong; 
But long ere our approaching heard within 
Noise, other than the sound of dance or song, 
Torment, and loud lament, and furious rage. 
Glad we returned up to the coasts of light 
Ere sabbath-evening: so we had in charge. 
But thy...Read More

by Milton, John
...gained, with serpent-tongue 
Organick, or impulse of vocal air, 
His fraudulent temptation thus began. 
Wonder not, sovran Mistress, if perhaps 
Thou canst, who art sole wonder! much less arm 
Thy looks, the Heaven of mildness, with disdain, 
Displeased that I approach thee thus, and gaze 
Insatiate; I thus single;nor have feared 
Thy awful brow, more awful thus retired. 
Fairest resemblance of thy Maker fair, 
Thee all things living gaze on, all things thine 
By gift...Read More

by Milton, John
...d, whatever in itself, 
Her doing seemed to justify the deed; 
She gave me of the tree, and I did eat. 
To whom the Sovran Presence thus replied. 
Was she thy God, that her thou didst obey 
Before his voice? or was she made thy guide, 
Superiour, or but equal, that to her 
Thou didst resign thy manhood, and the place 
Wherein God set thee above her made of thee, 
And for thee, whose perfection far excelled 
Hers in all real dignity? Adorned 
She was indeed, and lovely...Read More

by Milton, John
...d, resorting to the summons high; 
And took their seats; till from his throne supreme 
The Almighty thus pronounced his sovran will. 
O Sons, like one of us Man is become 
To know both good and evil, since his taste 
Of that defended fruit; but let him boast 
His knowledge of good lost, and evil got; 
Happier! had it sufficed him to have known 
Good by itself, and evil not at all. 
He sorrows now, repents, and prays contrite, 
My motions in him; longer than they move,...Read More

by Milton, John
...le blood,
The Trumpet spake not to the armed throng,
And Kings sate still with awfull eye,
As if they surely knew their sovran Lord was by. 

V

But peacefull was the night
Wherin the Prince of light
His raign of peace upon the earth began:
The Windes with wonder whist,
Smoothly the waters kist,
Whispering new joyes to the milde Ocean,
Who now hath quite forgot to rave,
While Birds of Calm sit brooding on the charmed wave.

VI

The Stars with deep amaze
Stand fit in s...Read More

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