Short Poetry by Popular Famous Poets

 Poet
1 William Wordsworth
2 William Shakespeare
3 Oscar Wilde
4 Emily Dickinson
5 Rabindranath Tagore
6 Maya Angelou
7 Robert Frost
8 Langston Hughes
9 Walt Whitman
10 Shel Silverstein
11 William Blake
12 Pablo Neruda
13 Rudyard Kipling
14 Sylvia Plath
15 William Butler Yeats
16 Alfred Lord Tennyson
17 Tupac Shakur
18 Edward Estlin (E E) Cummings
19 Charles Bukowski
20 Sarojini Naidu
21 Henry Wadsworth Longfellow
22 Muhammad Ali
23 Billy Collins
24 Christina Rossetti
25 Alice Walker
26 Sandra Cisneros
27 Ogden Nash
28 Carol Ann Duffy
29 John Donne
30 Edgar Allan Poe
31 Ralph Waldo Emerson
32 Raymond Carver
33 Nikki Giovanni
34 John Keats
35 Lewis Carroll
36 Spike Milligan
37 Thomas Hardy
38 Thunchaththu Ramanujan Ezhuthachan
39 Mark Twain
40 Carl Sandburg
41 Percy Bysshe Shelley
42 Anne Sexton
43 Alexander Pushkin
44 Henry David Thoreau
45 Roger McGough
46 Wendell Berry
47 Sara Teasdale
48 Victor Hugo
49 Elizabeth Barrett Browning
50 George (Lord) Byron

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Famous Short School Poems

Famous Short School Poems. Short School Poetry by Famous Poets. A collection of the all-time best School short poems

Other Short Poem Pages


Poems are below...


School | Short Famous Poems and Poets

 
by Gwendolyn Brooks

We Real Cool

 We real cool.
We Left School.
We Lurk late.
We Strike straight.
We Sing sin.
We Thin gin.
We Jazz June.
We Die soon.


by Charles Simic

The School Of Metaphysics

 Executioner happy to explain
How his wristwatch works
As he shadows me on the street.
I call him that because he is grim and officious And wears black.
The clock on the church tower Had stopped at five to eleven.
The morning newspapers had no date.
The gray building on the corner Could've been a state pen, And then he showed up with his watch, Whose Gothic numerals And the absence of hands He wanted me to understand Right then and there.


by Richard Brautigan

Gee Youre So Beautiful That Its Starting To Rain

 Oh, Marcia, 
I want your long blonde beauty
to be taught in high school,
so kids will learn that God
lives like music in the skin
and sounds like a sunshine harpsicord.
I want high school report cards to look like this: Playing with Gentle Glass Things A Computer Magic A Writing Letters to Those You Love A Finding out about Fish A Marcia's Long Blonde Beauty A+!


by Jane Kenyon

The Suitor

 We lie back to back.
Curtains lift and fall, like the chest of someone sleeping.
Wind moves the leaves of the box elder; they show their light undersides, turning all at once like a school of fish.
Suddenly I understand that I am happy.
For months this feeling has been coming closer, stopping for short visits, like a timid suitor.


by Emily Dickinson

God permit industrious angels

God permit industrious angels
Afternoons to play.
I met one, -- forgot my school-mates, All, for him, straightaway.
God calls home the angels promptly At the setting sun; I missed mine.
How dreary marbles, After playing the Crown!


by Robinson Jeffers

End Of The World

 When I was young in school in Switzerland, about the time of the Boer War,
We used to take it for known that the human race
Would last the earth out, not dying till the planet died.
I wrote a schoolboy poem About the last man walking in stoic dignity along the dead shore Of the last sea, alone, alone, alone, remembering all His racial past.
But now I don't think so.
They'll die faceless in flocks, And the earth flourish long after mankind is out.


by William Butler Yeats

Remorse For Intemperate Speech

 I ranted to the knave and fool,
But outgrew that school,
Would transform the part,
Fit audience found, but cannot rule
My fanatic heart.
I sought my betters: though in each Fine manners, liberal speech, Turn hatred into sport, Nothing said or done can reach My fanatic heart.
Out of Ireland have we come.
Great hatred, little room, Maimed us at the start.
I carry from my mother's womb A fanatic heart.


by Thomas Edward Brown

My Garden

 A garden is a lovesome thing, God wot!
Rose plot,
Fringed pool,
Ferned grot--
The veriest school
Of peace; and yet the fool
Contends that God is not--
Not God! in gardens! when the eve is cool?
Nay, but I have a sign;
'Tis very sure God walks in mine.


by Robert Burns

166. Epitaph for William Nicol High School Edinburgh

 YE maggots, feed on Nicol’s brain,
 For few sic feasts you’ve gotten;
And fix your claws in Nicol’s heart,
 For deil a bit o’t’s rotten.


by Robert Frost

What Fifty Said

 When I was young my teachers were the old.
I gave up fire for form till I was cold.
I suffered like a metal being cast.
I went to school to age to learn the past.
Now when I am old my teachers are the young.
What can't be molded must be cracked and sprung.
I strain at lessons fit to start a suture.
I go to school to youth to learn the future.


by Emily Dickinson

The Hills in Purple syllables

 The Hills in Purple syllables
The Day's Adventures tell
To little Groups of Continents
Just going Home from School.


by Robert Burns

196. Epitaph for Mr. W. Cruickshank

 HONEST 1 Will to Heaven’s away
 And mony shall lament him;
His fau’ts they a’ in Latin lay,
 In English nane e’er kent them.
Note 1.
Of the Edinburgh High School.
[back]


by Edgar Lee Masters

Yee Bow

 They got me into the Sunday-school
In Spoon River
And tried to get me to drop Confucius for Jesus.
I could have been no worse off If I had tried to get them to drop Jesus for Confucius.
For, without any warning, as if it were a prank, And sneaking up behind me, Harry Wiley, The minister's son, caved my ribs into my lungs, With a blow of his fist.
Now I shall never sleep with my ancestors in Pekin, And no children shall worship at my grave.


by Omar Khayyam

In the mosque, in the medresseh (school annexed to

In the mosque, in the medresseh [school annexed to
the mosque], in the church, and in the synagogue, they
have a horror of Hell and seek for Paradise, but the seed
of such disquiet never germinates in the hearts of those
who penetrate the secrets of the All-Powerful.


by Emily Dickinson

The nearest Dream recedes -- unrealized

 The nearest Dream recedes -- unrealized --
The Heaven we chase,
Like the June Bee -- before the School Boy,
Invites the Race --
Stoops -- to an easy Clover --
Dips -- evades -- teases -- deploys --
Then -- to the Royal Clouds
Lifts his light Pinnace --
Heedless of the Boy --
Staring -- bewildered -- at the mocking sky --
Homesick for steadfast Honey --
Ah, the Bee flies not
That brews that rare variety!


by Mother Goose

The Old Woman Of Surrey

 

There was an old woman in Surrey,
Who was morn, noon, and night in a hurry;
    Called her husband a fool,
    Drove the children to school,
The worrying old woman of Surrey.


by Amy Lowell

The Trout

 Naughty little speckled trout,
Can't I coax you to come out?
Is it such great fun to play
In the water every day?
Do you pull the Naiads' hair
Hiding in the lilies there?
Do you hunt for fishes' eggs,
Or watch tadpoles grow their legs?
Do the little trouts have school
In some deep sun-glinted pool,
And in recess play at tag
Round that bed of purple flag?
I have tried so hard to catch you,
Hours and hours I've sat to watch you;
But you never will come out,
Naughty little speckled trout!


by Mother Goose

The Alphabet

 

A, B, C, and D,
Pray, playmates, agree.
E, F, and G,
Well, so it shall be.
J, K, and L,
In peace we will dwell.
M, N, and O,
To play let us go.
P, Q, R, and S,
Love may we possess.
W, X, and Y,
Will not quarrel or die.
Z, and ampersand,
Go to school at command.


by Emily Dickinson

Tis One by One -- the Father counts --

 'Tis One by One -- the Father counts --
And then a Tract between
Set Cypherless -- to teach the Eye
The Value of its Ten --

Until the peevish Student
Acquire the Quick of Skill --
Then Numerals are dowered back --
Adorning all the Rule --

'Tis mostly Slate and Pencil --
And Darkness on the School
Distracts the Children's fingers --
Still the Eternal Rule

Regards least Cypherer alike
With Leader of the Band --
And every separate Urchin's Sum --
Is fashioned for his hand --


by Rg Gregory

art school

 each sunset is unique
so others tell us

fools - with flowers
of envy pushing

through their teeth
i think differently

a feeble skill that
can't repeat itself

i'll have the sun in
for a spell to make

a proper artist of him
by time i finish with

this yellow fickle lout
his sunset will be perfect


by Johann Wolfgang von Goethe

TO ORIGINALS

 In these numbers be express'd
Meaning deep, 'neath merry jest.
----- TO ORIGINALS.
A FELLOW says: "I own no school or college; No master lives whom I acknowledge; And pray don't entertain the thought That from the dead I e'er learnt aught.
" This, if I rightly understand, Means: "I'm a blockhead at first hand.
" 1815.


by Johann Wolfgang von Goethe

MAIDEN WISHES

 WHAT pleasure to me
A bridegroom would be!
When married we are,
They call us mamma.
No need then to sew, To school we ne'er go; Command uncontroll'd, Have maids, whom to scold; Choose clothes at our ease, Of what tradesmen we please; Walk freely about, And go to each rout, And unrestrained are By papa or mamma.
1767-9.


by Omar Khayyam

Ah! seasoned wine oft falls to rawest fools,

Ah! seasoned wine oft falls to rawest fools,
And clumsiest workmen own the finest tools;
And Turki maids, fit to delight men's hearts,
Lavish their smiles on beardless boys in school!


by Omar Khayyam

Take care, take good care of making noise in a tavern!

Take care, take good care of making noise in a tavern!
Pass the time there, but avoid all agitation. Sell the
turban, sell the book [the Koran] to buy wine. Finally,
let us pass through the medresseh [school of the mosques],
but let us not stop there.


by Omar Khayyam

In synagogue and cloister, mosque and school,

In synagogue and cloister, mosque and school,
Hell's terrors and heaven's lures men's bosoms rule,
But they who master Allah's mysteries,
Sow not this empty chaff their hearts to fool.