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David Herbert Lawrence Short Poems

Famous Short David Herbert Lawrence Poems. Short poetry by famous poet David Herbert Lawrence. A collection of the all-time best David Herbert Lawrence short poems


by David Herbert Lawrence
 The hoar-frost crumbles in the sun, 
The crisping steam of a train 
Melts in the air, while two black birds 
Sweep past the window again.
Along the vacant road, a red Bicycle approaches; I wait In a thaw of anxiety, for the boy To leap down at our gate.
He has passed us by; but is it Relief that starts in my breast? Or a deeper bruise of knowing that still She has no rest.



by David Herbert Lawrence
 Outside the house an ash-tree hung its terrible whips,
And at night when the wind arose, the lash of the tree 
Shrieked and slashed the wind, as a ship’s 
Weird rigging in a storm shrieks hideously.
Within the house two voices arose in anger, a slender lash Whistling delirious rage, and the dreadful sound Of a thick lash booming and bruising, until it drowned The other voice in a silence of blood, ’neath the noise of the ash.

by David Herbert Lawrence
 The profoundest of all sensualities
is the sense of truth
and the next deepest sensual experience
is the sense of justice.

by David Herbert Lawrence
 The youth walks up to the white horse, to put its halter on
and the horse looks at him in silence.
They are so silent, they are in another world.

by David Herbert Lawrence
 Many years have I still to burn, detained
Like a candle flame on this body; but I enshine 
A darkness within me, a presence which sleeps contained
In my flame of living, her soul enfolded in mine.
And through these years, while I burn on the fuel of life, What matter the stuff I lick up in my living flame, Seeing I keep in the fire-core, inviolate, A night where she dreams my dreams for me, ever the same.

by David Herbert Lawrence
 Don't you care for my love? she said bitterly.
I handed her the mirror, and said: Please address these questions to the proper person! Please make all requests to head-quarters! In all matters of emotional importance please approach the supreme authority direct! - So I handed her the mirror.
And she would have broken it over my head, but she caught sight of her own reflection and that held her spellbound for two seconds while I fled.

by David Herbert Lawrence
 When along the pavement,
Palpitating flames of life, 
People flicker round me, 
I forget my bereavement, 
The gap in the great constellation,
The place where a star used to be.
Nay, though the pole-star Is blown out like a candle, And all the heavens are wandering in disarray, Yet when pleiads of people are Deployed around me, and I see The street’s long outstretched Milky Way, When people flicker down the pavement, I forget my bereavement.



Green  Create an image from this poem
by David Herbert Lawrence
 The dawn was apple-green,
The sky was green wine held up in the sun,
The moon was a golden petal between.
She opened her eyes, and green They shone, clear like flowers undone, For the first time, now for the first time seen.

by David Herbert Lawrence
 I look at the swaling sunset 
And wish I could go also 
Through the red doors beyond the black-purple bar.
I wish that I could go Through the red doors where I could put off My shame like shoes in the porch, My pain like garments, And leave my flesh discarded lying Like luggage of some departed traveller Gone one knows not where.
Then I would turn round, And seeing my cast-off body lying like lumber, I would laugh with joy.

Dreams  Create an image from this poem
by David Herbert Lawrence
 All people dream, but not equally.
Those who dream by night in the dusty recesses of their mind, Wake in the morning to find that it was vanity.
But the dreamers of the day are dangerous people, For they dream their dreams with open eyes, And make them come true.

by David Herbert Lawrence
 People were bathing and posturing themselves on the beach, 
and all was dreary, great robot limbs, robot breasts, 
robot voices, robot even the gay umbrellas.
But a woman, shy and alone, was washing herself under a tap and the glimmer of the presence of the gods was like lilies, and like water-lilies.

by David Herbert Lawrence
 Tell me a word
that you've often heard,
yet it makes you squint
when you see it in print!

Tell me a thing
that you've often seen
yet if put in a book
it makes you turn green!

Tell me a thing
that you often do,
when described in a story
shocks you through and through!

Tell me what's wrong
with words or with you
that you don't mind the thing
yet the name is taboo.

by David Herbert Lawrence
 When the wind blows her veil
And uncovers her laughter
I cease, I turn pale.
When the wind blows her veil From the woes I bewail Of love and hereafter: When the wind blows her veil I cease, I turn pale.

by David Herbert Lawrence
 I never saw a wild thing 
sorry for itself.
A small bird will drop frozen dead from a bough without ever having felt sorry for itself.

by David Herbert Lawrence
 A yellow leaf from the darkness 
Hops like a frog before me.
Why should I start and stand still? I was watching the woman that bore me Stretched in the brindled darkness Of the sick-room, rigid with will To die: and the quick leaf tore me Back to this rainy swill Of leaves and lamps and traffic mingled before me.

by David Herbert Lawrence
 Search for nothing any more, nothing
except truth.
Be very still, and try and get at the truth.
And the first question to ask yourself is: How great a liar am I?

by David Herbert Lawrence
 We are a liars, because
the truth of yesterday becomes a lie tomorrow,
whereas letters are fixed,
and we live by the letter of truth.
The love I feel for my friend, this year, is different from the love I felt last year.
If it were not so, it would be a lie.
Yet we reiterate love! love! love! as if it were a coin with a fixed value instead of a flower that dies, and opens a different bud.

Sorrow  Create an image from this poem
by David Herbert Lawrence
 Why does the thin grey strand 
Floating up from the forgotten 
Cigarette between my fingers, 
Why does it trouble me? 

Ah, you will understand;
When I carried my mother downstairs,
A few times only, at the beginning 
Of her soft-foot malady, 

I should find, for a reprimand
To my gaiety, a few long grey hairs
On the breast of my coat; and one by one
I let them float up the dark chimney.

Belief  Create an image from this poem
by David Herbert Lawrence
 Forever nameless
Forever unknwon
Forever unconceived
Forever unrepresented
yet forever felt in the soul.

by David Herbert Lawrence
 A wind comes from the north
Blowing little flocks of birds 
Like spray across the town, 
And a train, roaring forth, 
Rushes stampeding down
With cries and flying curds
Of steam, out of the darkening north.
Whither I turn and set Like a needle steadfastly, Waiting ever to get The news that she is free; But ever fixed, as yet, To the lode of her agony.

by David Herbert Lawrence
 There is nothing to save, now all is lost,
but a tiny core of stillness in the heart
like the eye of a violet.

by David Herbert Lawrence
 I can’t stand Willy Wet-Leg, 
Can’t stand him at any price.
He’s resigned, and when you hit him he lets you hit him twice.

by David Herbert Lawrence
 The feelings I don't have I don't have.
The feeling I don't have, I won't say I have.
The feelings you say you have, you don't have.
The feelings you would like us both to have, we neither of us have.
The feelings people ought to have, they never have.
If people say they've got feelings, you may be pretty sure they haven't got them.
So if you want either of us to feel anything at all You'd better abandon all ideas of feelings altogether.

by David Herbert Lawrence
 Ah, my darling, when over the purple horizon shall loom
The shrouded mother of a new idea, men hide their faces,
Cry out and fend her off, as she seeks her procreant groom,
Wounding themselves against her, denying her fecund embraces.

by David Herbert Lawrence
 There are only two things now,
The great black night scooped out
And this fireglow.
This fireglow, the core, And we the two ripe pips That are held in store.
Listen, the darkness rings As it circulates round our fire.
Take off your things.
Your shoulders, your bruised throat! You breasts, your nakedness! This fiery coat! As the darkness flickers and dips, As the firelight falls and leaps From your feet to your lips!