Short Poetry by Popular Famous Poets

 Poet
1 William Wordsworth
2 William Shakespeare
3 Oscar Wilde
4 Emily Dickinson
5 Maya Angelou
6 Rabindranath Tagore
7 Robert Frost
8 Langston Hughes
9 Walt Whitman
10 Shel Silverstein
11 William Blake
12 Sylvia Plath
13 Pablo Neruda
14 Alfred Lord Tennyson
15 William Butler Yeats
16 Rudyard Kipling
17 Tupac Shakur
18 Edward Estlin (E E) Cummings
19 Charles Bukowski
20 Muhammad Ali
21 Henry Wadsworth Longfellow
22 Sandra Cisneros
23 Sarojini Naidu
24 Alice Walker
25 Billy Collins
26 Christina Rossetti
27 Carol Ann Duffy
28 Edgar Allan Poe
29 John Donne
30 Ralph Waldo Emerson
31 Nikki Giovanni
32 Raymond Carver
33 John Keats
34 Ogden Nash
35 Lewis Carroll
36 Thomas Hardy
37 Mark Twain
38 Spike Milligan
39 Carl Sandburg
40 Anne Sexton
41 Alexander Pushkin
42 Percy Bysshe Shelley
43 Henry David Thoreau
44 Elizabeth Barrett Browning
45 Thunchaththu Ramanujan Ezhuthachan
46 Roger McGough
47 Sara Teasdale
48 Victor Hugo
49 George (Lord) Byron
50 Gary Soto

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Famous Short Age Poems

Famous Short Age Poems. Short Age Poetry by Famous Poets. A collection of the all-time best Age short poems

Other Short Poem Pages


Poems are below...


Age | Short Famous Poems and Poets

 
by Nikki Giovanni

Love Is

Some people forget that love is
tucking you in and kissing you
"Good night"
no matter how young or old you are


Some people don't remember that
love is
listening and laughing and asking
questions
no matter what your age


Few recognize that love is
commitment, responsibility
no fun at all
unless


Love is
You and me 


by Dorothy Parker

Lines On Reading Too Many Poets

 Roses, rooted warm in earth,
Bud in rhyme, another age;
Lilies know a ghostly birth
Strewn along a patterned page;
Golden lad and chimbley sweep
Die; and so their song shall keep.
Wind that in Arcadia starts In and out a couplet plays; And the drums of bitter hearts Beat the measure of a phrase.
Sweets and woes but come to print Quae cum ita sint.


by Henry David Thoreau

Epitaph On The World

 Here lies the body of this world, 
Whose soul alas to hell is hurled.
This golden youth long since was past, Its silver manhood went as fast, An iron age drew on at last; 'Tis vain its character to tell, The several fates which it befell, What year it died, when 'twill arise, We only know that here it lies.


by Walt Whitman

To Old Age

 I SEE in you the estuary that enlarges and spreads itself grandly as it pours in the great
 Sea.


by Walt Whitman

Beginners

 HOW they are provided for upon the earth, (appearing at intervals;) 
How dear and dreadful they are to the earth; 
How they inure to themselves as much as to any—What a paradox appears their age; 
How people respond to them, yet know them not; 
How there is something relentless in their fate, all times;
How all times mischoose the objects of their adulation and reward, 
And how the same inexorable price must still be paid for the same great purchase.


by Adrian Green

Mirror

 There are no lies 
in the morning
no cheating of age

an illusion of eye
smoothing skin over bone.
No portrait hidden away becoming skeletal and demanding release.
Another day to face, my confessor, so laugh at this charting of years.


by Ogden Nash

Crossing The Border

 Senescence begins
And middle age ends
The day your descendents
Outnumber your friends.


by William Butler Yeats

A Prayer For Old Age

 God guard me from those thoughts men think
In the mind alone;
He that sings a lasting song
Thinks in a marrow-bone;

From all that makes a wise old man
That can be praised of all;
O what am I that I should not seem
For the song's sake a fool?

I pray -- for word is out
And prayer comes round again --
That I may seem, though I die old,
A foolish, passionate man.


by Sir Walter Raleigh

Epitaph

 Even such is time, which takes in trust 
Our youth, our joys, and all we have, 
And pays us but with age and dust, 
Who in the dark and silent grave 
When we have wandered all our ways 
Shuts up the story of our days, 
And from which earth, and grave, and dust 
The Lord will raise me up, I trust.


by Constantine P Cavafy

Very Seldom

 He's an old man.
Used up and bent, crippled by time and indulgence, he slowly walks along the narrow street.
But when he goes inside his house to hide the shambles of his old age, his mind turns to the share in youth that still belongs to him.
His verse is now recited by young men.
His visions come before their lively eyes.
Their healthy sensual minds, their shapely taut bodies stir to his perception of the beautiful.
Trans.
by Edmund Keeley and Philip Sherrard


by Li Po

A Mountain Revelry

 To wash and rinse our souls of their age-old sorrows,
We drained a hundred jugs of wine.
A splendid night it was .
.
.
.
In the clear moonlight we were loath to go to bed, But at last drunkenness overtook us; And we laid ourselves down on the empty mountain, The earth for pillow, and the great heaven for coverlet.


by Philip Larkin

New Eyes Each Year

 New eyes each year
Find old books here,
And new books,too,
Old eyes renew;
So youth and age
Like ink and page
In this house join,
Minting new coin.


by Robert Frost

The Lockless Door

 It went many years,
But at last came a knock,
And I though of the door
With no lock to lock.
I blew out the light, I tip-toed the floor, And raised both hands In prayer to the door.
But the knock came again.
My window was wide; I climbed on the sill And descended outside.
Back over the sill I bade a 'Come in' To whatever the knock At the door may have been.
So at a knock I emptied my cage To hide in the world And alter with age.


by Charles Bukowski

Sway With Me

 sway with me, everything sad --
madmen in stone houses
without doors,
lepers steaming love and song
frogs trying to figure
the sky;
sway with me, sad things --
fingers split on a forge
old age like breakfast shell
used books, used people
used flowers, used love
I need you
I need you
I need you:
it has run away
like a horse or a dog,
dead or lost
or unforgiving.


by Omar Khayyam

The stars, who dwell on heaven's exalted stage,

The stars, who dwell on heaven's exalted stage,
Baffle the wise diviners of our age;
Take heed, hold fast the rope of mother wit.
These augurs all distrust their own presage.


by Ogden Nash

The Romantic Age

 This one is entering her teens,
Ripe for sentimental scenes,
Has picked a gangling unripe male,
Sees herself in bridal veil,
Presses lips and tosses head,
Declares she's not too young to wed,
Informs you pertly you forget
Romeo and Juliet.
Do not argue, do not shout; Remind her how that one turned out.


by Stephen Crane

In a lonely place

 In a lonely place,
I encountered a sage
Who sat, all still,
Regarding a newspaper.
He accosted me: "Sir, what is this?" Then I saw that I was greater, Aye, greater than this sage.
I answered him at once, "Old, old man, it is the wisdom of the age.
" The sage looked upon me with admiration.


by Friedrich von Schiller

Hope

 We speak with the lip, and we dream in the soul,
Of some better and fairer day;
And our days, the meanwhile, to that golden goal
Are gliding and sliding away.
Now the world becomes old, now again it is young, But "The better" 's forever the word on the tongue.
At the threshold of life hope leads us in-- Hope plays round the mirthful boy; Though the best of its charms may with youth begin, Yet for age it reserves its toy.


by Ralph Waldo Emerson

Heri Cras Hodie

SHINES the last age the next with hope is seen  
To-day slinks poorly off unmarked between: 
Future or Past no richer secret folds  
O friendless Present! than thy bosom holds.


by Edgar Lee Masters

Alexander Throckmorton

 In youth my wings were strong and tireless,
But I did not know the mountains.
In age I knew the mountains But my weary wings could not follow my vision -- Genius is wisdom and youth.


by William Butler Yeats

Peace

 Ah, that Time could touch a form
That could show what Homer's age
Bred to be a hero's wage.
'Were not all her life but storm Would not painters paint a form Of such noble lines,' I said, 'Such a delicate high head, All that sternness amid charm, All that sweetness amid strength?' Ah, but peace that comes at length, Came when Time had touched her form.


by Wang Wei

My Retreat at Mount Zhongnan

 My heart in middle age found the Way.
And I came to dwell at the foot of this mountain.
When the spirit moves, I wander alone Amid beauty that is all for me.
.
.
.
I will walk till the water checks my path, Then sit and watch the rising clouds -- And some day meet an old wood-cutter And talk and laugh and never return.


by Walt Whitman

This Dust was Once the Man

 THIS dust was once the Man, 
Gentle, plain, just and resolute—under whose cautious hand, 
Against the foulest crime in history known in any land or age, 
Was saved the Union of These States.


by Paul Eluard

Other Children

 "Little child of my five senses 
and of my tenderness.
" Let us cradle our loves, We will have good children.
Well cared for, We will fear nothing on earth, Happiness, good fortune, prudence, Our loves And this leap from age to age, From the order of a child to that of an old man, Will not diminish us.
(Confidence).


by Peter Huchel

Answer

 Sound, sound the clarion, fill the fife!
To all the sensual world proclaim,
One crowded hour of glorious life
Is worth an age without a name.







...