Get Your Premium Membership

Famous Magpie Poems by Famous Poets

These are examples of famous Magpie poems written by some of the greatest and most-well-known modern and classical poets. PoetrySoup is a great educational poetry resource of famous magpie poems. These examples illustrate what a famous magpie poem looks like and its form, scheme, or style (where appropriate).

See also:

by Ginsberg, Allen
...Tail turned to red sunset on a juniper crown a lone magpie cawks.

Mad at Oryoki in the shrine-room -- Thistles blossomed late afternoon.

Put on my shirt and took it off in the sun walking the path to lunch.

A dandelion seed floats above the marsh grass with the mosquitos.

At 4 A.M. the two middleaged men sleeping together holding hands.

In the half-light of dawn a few birds wa...Read more of this...



by Paterson, Andrew Barton
...e some of 'em done already. 

But round the track she begins to tire, 
And a mighty shout goes up "Crossfire!" 
The magpie jacket's leading; 
And Crossfire challenges fierce and bold, 
And the lead she'll have and the lead she'll hold, 
But at length gives way to the black and gold, 
Which right to the front is speeding. 

Carry them on and keep it up -- 
A flying race is the Melbourne Cup, 
You must race and stay to win it; 
And old Commotion, Victoria's pride, 
Now ...Read more of this...

by Clare, John
...th white neck peering to the evening clowd.
The weary rooks to distant woods are gone.
With lengths of tail the magpie winnows on
To neighbouring tree, and leaves the distant crow
While small birds nestle in the edge below....Read more of this...

by Hyakunin Isshu, Ogura
...If the "Magpie Bridge"--
Bridge by flight of magpies spanned,--
White with frost I see:--
With a deep-laid frost made white:--
Late, I know, has grown the night....Read more of this...

by Longfellow, Henry Wadsworth
...hand
Down on the pavement below the clattering scales of the balance,
And in the hollow thereof was found the nest of a magpie,
Into whose clay-built walls the necklace of pearls was inwoven."
Silenced, but not convinced, when the story was ended, the blacksmith
Stood like a man who fain would speak, but findeth no language;
All his thoughts were congealed into lines on his face, as the vapors
Freeze in fantastic shapes on the window-panes in the winter.

Then Evangel...Read more of this...



by Tebb, Barry
...what did I make of it?

The voices coming into my head

Welcoming kin, alive or dead, my eyes

Jerking to the roadside magpie,

Its white tail-bar doing a hop, skip and jump....Read more of this...

by Milosz, Czeslaw
...ite the same, I walked through oak forests
Amazed that my Muse, Mnemosyne,
Has in no way diminished my amazement.
A magpie was screeching and I said: Magpiety?
What is magpiety? I shall never achieve
A magpie heart, a hairy nostril over the beak, a flight
That always renews just when coming down,
And so I shall never comprehend magpiety.
If however magpiety does not exist
My nature does not exist either.
Who would have guessed that, centuries later,
I would invent...Read more of this...

by Levine, Philip
...han half
my age, could be the person
 fashioning these lines.
That was late July of '60.
 I had heard
all about magpies, how they
 snooped and meddled
in the affairs of others, not
 birds so much
as people. If you dared
 to remove a wedding
ring as you washed away
 the stickiness of love
or the cherished odors of another
 man or woman,
as you turned away
 from the mirror
having admired your new-found
 potency -- humming
"My Funny Valentine" or
 "Body and Soul" --
...Read more of this...

by Levine, Philip
...The magpie in the Joshua tree 
Has come to rest. Darkness collects, 
And what I cannot hear or see, 
Broken limbs, the curious bird, 
Become in darkness darkness too. 
I had been going when I heard 
The sound of something called the night; 
I had been going but I stopped 
To see the bird restrain his flight. 
The bird in place, the shadows dropped 
A...Read more of this...

by Wordsworth, William
...e birds are singing in the distant woods; 
Over his own sweet voice the Stock-dove broods; 
The Jay makes answer as the Magpie chatters; 
And all the air is filled with pleasant noise of waters. 

II 

All things that love the sun are out of doors; 
The sky rejoices in the morning's birth; 
The grass is bright with rain-drops;--on the moors 
The hare is running races in her mirth; 
And with her feet she from the plashy earth 
Raises a mist, that, glittering in the sun, 
R...Read more of this...

by Wordsworth, William
...e birds are singing in the distant woods; 
Over his own sweet voice the Stock-dove broods; 
The Jay makes answer as the Magpie chatters; 
And all the air is filled with pleasant noise of waters. 

II 

All things that love the sun are out of doors; 
The sky rejoices in the morning's birth; 
The grass is bright with rain-drops;--on the moors 
The hare is running races in her mirth; 
And with her feet she from the plashy earth 
Raises a mist, that, glittering in the sun, 
R...Read more of this...

by Ammons, A R
...hale **** (what
a sight, deep assumption), mandril **** (blazing
blast off), weasel **** (wiles' waste), gazelle ****,

magpie **** (total protein), tiger **** (too acid
to contemplate), moral eel and manta ray ****, eerie
shark ****, earthworm **** (a soilure), crab ****,

wolf **** upon the germicidal ice, snake ****, giraffe
**** that accelerates, secretary bird ****, turtle
**** suspension invites, remora **** slightly in

advance of the shark ****, hornet **** (difficult...Read more of this...

by Paterson, Andrew Barton
...wild thrush lifts a note of mirth; 
The bronzewing pigeons call and coo 
Beside their nests the long day through; 
The magpie warbles clear and strong 
A joyous, glad, thanksgiving song, 
For all God's mercies upon earth. 

And many voices such as these 
Are joyful sounds for those to tell, 
Who know the Bush and love it well, 
With all its hidden mysteries. 

We cannot love the restless sea, 
That rolls and tosses to and fro 
Like some fierce creature in its glee; 
...Read more of this...

by Lawson, Henry
...s when it rains like anything. 

In the bush my ears were opened to the singing of the bird, 
But the `carol of the magpie' was a thing I never heard. 
Once the beggar roused my slumbers in a shanty, it is true, 
But I only heard him asking, `Who the blanky blank are you?' 
And the bell-bird in the ranges -- but his `silver chime' is harsh 
When it's heard beside the solo of the curlew in the marsh. 

Yes, I heard the shearers singing `William Riley', out of tune,...Read more of this...

by Lawson, Henry
...d city and town; 
Each for his lawn and table and the bed where he lies him down. 

Cobbler and crank and chandler, magpie and ape disguised; 
Each bound to his grocery corner – these are the Five we prized; 
Bleating the teaching of others whom they ever despised. 

But three shall meet in a cellar, companions of mildew and rats; 
And three shall meet in a garret, pungent with stench of the cats, 
And three in a cave in the forest where the torchlight maddens the bat...Read more of this...

by Fincke, Gary
...When magpies die, each of the living swoops down 
           and pecks, one by one, in an accepted order.
 
He coaxed my car to start, the boy who’s killed himself.
He twisted a cable, performed CPR on
The carburetor while my three children shivered
Through the unanswerable questions about stalled.
He chose shotgun, full in the face, so no one ...Read more of this...

by Chaucer, Geoffrey
...she were well y-nourish'd, and a maid,
To saven his estate and yeomanry:
And she was proud, and pert as is a pie*. *magpie
A full fair sight it was to see them two;
On holy days before her would he go
With his tippet* y-bound about his head; *hood
And she came after in a gite* of red, *gown 
And Simkin hadde hosen of the same.
There durste no wight call her aught but Dame:
None was so hardy, walking by that way,
That with her either durste *rage or play*, *use free...Read more of this...

by Chaucer, Geoffrey
...ay, he had a paramour,
And I was young and full of ragerie,* *wantonness
Stubborn and strong, and jolly as a pie.* *magpie
Then could I dance to a harpe smale,
And sing, y-wis,* as any nightingale, *certainly
When I had drunk a draught of sweete wine.
Metellius, the foule churl, the swine,
That with a staff bereft his wife of life
For she drank wine, though I had been his wife,
Never should he have daunted me from drink:
And, after wine, of Venus most I think.
For...Read more of this...

by Hughes, Ted
...guyrope, 

The fields quivering, the skyline a grimace,
At any second to bang and vanish with a flap;
The wind flung a magpie away and a black-
Back gull bent like an iron bar slowly. The house 

Rang like some fine green goblet in the note
That any second would shatter it. Now deep
In chairs, in front of the great fire, we grip
Our hearts and cannot entertain book, thought, 

Or each other. We watch the fire blazing,
And feel the roots of the house move, but sit...Read more of this...

Dont forget to view our wonderful member Magpie poems.


Book: Shattered Sighs