Famous Herring Poems by Famous Poets

These are examples of famous Herring poems written by well-known modern and classical poets. PoetrySoup is a great educational poetry resource of famous herring poems.

These examples illustrate what a famous herring poem looks like and its form, scheme, or style (where appropriate). The poems may also contain the word 'herring'.

Don't forget to view our Member Herring Poems. You can find great herring poems there too.

See also:
 
by Whitman, Walt
 AMERICA always! 
Always our own feuillage! 
Always Florida’s green peninsula! Always the priceless delta of Louisiana! Always the
 cotton-fields of Alabama and Texas! 
Always California’s golden hills and hollows—and...Read More
by Sandburg, Carl
 THERE is a wolf in me … fangs pointed for tearing gashes … a red tongue for raw meat … and the hot lapping of blood—I keep this wolf...Read More
by Bishop, Elizabeth
Although it is a cold evening,
down by one of the fishhouses
an old man sits netting,
his net, in the gloaming almost invisible,
a dark purple-brown,
and his shuttle worn and polished.
The air smells...Read More
by Trumbull, John
 Now warm with ministerial ire,
Fierce sallied forth our loyal 'Squire,
And on his striding steps attends
His desperate clan of Tory friends.
When sudden met his wrathful eye
A pole ascending through the...Read More
by Schwartz, Delmore
 I Christmas Poem for Nancy

Noel, Noel
We live and we die
Between heaven and hell
Between the earth and the sky
And all shall be well
And all shall be unwell
And once again! all...Read More
by Milligan, Spike
 Elephants are contagious!
Be careful how you tread.
An Elephant that's been trodden on
Should be confined to bed!

Leopards are contagious too.
Be careful tiny tots.
They don't give you a temperature
But lots and...Read More
by Longfellow, Henry Wadsworth
 You shall hear how Hiawatha 
Prayed and fasted in the forest, 
Not for greater skill in hunting, 
Not for greater craft in fishing, 
Not for triumphs in the battle,...Read More
by Robinson, Edwin Arlington
 (AMSTERDAM, 1645)


And there you are again, now as you are. 
Observe yourself as you discern yourself 
In your discredited ascendency; 
Without your velvet or your feathers now, 
Commend your...Read More
by Marvell, Andrew
 Holland, that scarce deserves the name of Land,
As but th'Off-scouring of the Brittish Sand;
And so much Earth as was contributed
By English Pilots when they heav'd the Lead;
Or what by...Read More
by Smart, Christopher
 Let Dew, house of Dew rejoice with Xanthenes a precious stone of an amber colour. 

Let Round, house of Round rejoice with Myrmecites a gern having an Emmet in...Read More
by Field, Eugene
 Wynken, Blynken, and Nod one night
Sailed off in a wooden shoe,--
Sailed on a river of misty light
Into a sea of dew.
"Where are you going, and what do you wish?"
The...Read More
by McHugh, Heather
 The gh comes from rough, the o from women's,
and the ti from unmentionables--presto:
there's the perfect English instance of
unlovablility--complete

with fish. Our wish was for a better
revelation: for a correspondence--
if not...Read More
by Sandburg, Carl
 TWO Swede families live downstairs and an Irish policeman upstairs, and an old soldier, Uncle Joe.
Two Swede boys go upstairs and see Joe. His wife is dead, his only...Read More
by Larkin, Philip
 Lonely in Ireland, since it was not home, 
Strangeness made sense. The salt rebuff of speech, 
Insisting so on difference, made me welcome: 
Once that was recognised, we were...Read More
by Yeats, William Butler
 You waves, though you dance by my feet like children at play,
Though you glow and you glance, though you purr and you dart;
In the Junes that were warmer than...Read More
by Sandburg, Carl
 I KNOW a Jew fish crier down on Maxwell Street with a
voice like a north wind blowing over corn stubble
in January.
He dangles herring before prospective customers evincing
a joy identical...Read More
by Stone, Ruth
This tedious letter to you,
what is one Life to another?
We walk around inside our bags,
sucking it in, spewing it out.
Then the insects, swarms heavier
than all the animals of the world.
Then...Read More
by Kipling, Rudyard
 In Lowestoft a boat was laid,
 Mark well what I do say!
And she was built for the herring-trade,
 But she has gone a-rovin', a-rovin', a-rovin',
 The Lord knows where!

They...Read More
by Butler, Ellis Parker
 When I go rowing on the lake,
 I long to be a man;
I’ll give my Sunday frock to have
 A callous heart like Dan.

I love the ripple of the...Read More
by Field, Eugene
 Wynken, Blynken, and Nod one night
Sailed off in a wooden shoe,--
Sailed on a river of crystal light
Into a sea of dew.
"Where are you going, and what do you wish?"
The...Read More
Dont forget to view our wonderful member Herring poems.