Get Your Premium Membership

Famous French Poems by Famous Poets

These are examples of famous French poems written by some of the greatest and most-well-known modern and classical poets. PoetrySoup is a great educational poetry resource of famous french poems. These examples illustrate what a famous french poem looks like and its form, scheme, or style (where appropriate).

See also:

by Longfellow, Henry Wadsworth
...his great watch tick.
Four long years in the times of the war had he languished a captive,
Suffering much in an old French fort as the friend of the English.
Now, though warier grown, without all guile or suspicion,
Ripe in wisdom was he, but patient, and simple, and childlike.
He was beloved by all, and most of all by the children;
For he told them tales of the Loup-garou in the forest,
And of the goblin that came in the night to water the horses,
And of the whit...Read More



by Frost, Robert
...immy only made his jaw recede
Fool-like, and rolled his eyes as if to say
He saw himself a farmer. Then there was a French boy
Who said with seriousness that made them laugh,
“Ma friend, you ain’t know what it is you’re ask.”
He doffed his cap and held it with both hands
Across his chest to make as ’twere a bow:
“We’re giving you our chances on de farm.”
And then they all turned to with deafening boots
And put each other bodily out of the house.
“Goodby to the...Read More

by Angelou, Maya
...

So say the Asian, the Hispanic, the Jew
The African and Native American, the Sioux,
The Catholic, the Muslim, the French, the Greek
The Irish, the Rabbi, the Priest, the Sheikh,
The Gay, the Straight, the Preacher,
The privileged, the homeless, the Teacher.
They hear. They all hear
The speaking of the Tree.

Today, the first and last of every Tree
Speaks to humankind. Come to me, here beside the River.

Plant yourself beside me, here beside...Read More

by Marvell, Andrew
...asks supply. 
He needs no seal but to St James's lease, 
Whose breeches wear the instrument of peace; 
Who, if the French dispute his power, from thence 
Can straight produce them a plenipotence.. 
Nor fears he the Most Christian should trepan 
Two saints at once, St Germain, St Alban, 
But thought the Golden Age was now restored, 
When men and women took each other's word. 

Paint then again Her Highness to the life, 
Philosopher beyond Newcastle's wife....Read More

by Moore, Marianne
...er
when she was so handsome
she gave me a start,
able to write simultaneously
in three languages --
English, German and French
and talk in the meantime;
equally positive in demanding a commotion
and in stipulating quiet:
"I should like to be alone;"
to which the visitor replies,
"I should like to be alone;
why not be alone together?"
Below the incandescent stars
below the incandescent fruit,
the strange experience of beauty;
its existence is too much;
it tears one to pieces
a...Read More



by Angelou, Maya
...>
So say the Asian, the Hispanic, the Jew,
The African and Native American, the Sioux,
The Catholic, the Muslim, the French, the Greek,
The Irish, the Rabbi, the Priest, the Sheikh,
The Gay, the Straight, the Preacher,
The privileged, the homeless, the teacher.
They hear. They all hear
The speaking of the tree.
Today, the first and last of every tree
Speaks to humankind. Come to me, here beside the river.
Plant yourself beside me, here beside th...Read More

by Whitman, Walt
...th castanets, in the chestnut shade, to the rebeck and guitar;

I hear continual echoes from the Thames; 
I hear fierce French liberty songs; 
I hear of the Italian boat-sculler the musical recitative of old poems;
I hear the Virginia plantation-chorus of *******, of a harvest night, in the glare of
 pine-knots; 
I hear the strong baritone of the ’long-shore-men of Mannahatta; 
I hear the stevedores unlading the cargoes, and singing; 
I hear the screams of the water-fowl of s...Read More

by Ashbery, John
...e window doesn't matter much, or that
Sliver of window or mirror on the right, even
As a gauge of the weather, which in French is
Le temps, the word for time, and which
Follows a course wherein changes are merely
Features of the whole. The whole is stable within
Instability, a globe like ours, resting
On a pedestal of vacuum, a ping-pong ball
Secure on its jet of water.
And just as there are no words for the surface, that is,
No words to say what it really is, that it...Read More

by Byron, George (Lord)
...etailed in any book of Eastern travels. That it possesses a charm peculiar to itself, cannot be denied. A young French renegado confessed to Chateaubriand, that he never found himself alone, galloping in the desert, without a sensation approaching to rapture, which was indescribable. 

(39) "Jannat al Aden," the perpetual abode, the Mussulman paradise. 

(40) A turban is carved in stone above the graves of men only. 

(41) The death-song of the Turkish wom...Read More

by Masefield, John
...mber Joe the bloody liar." 
"Who says I lie?" "I do." 
"You lie, 
I climbed the spire and had a fly." 
"I'm French Suzanne, the Circus Dancer, 
I'm going to dance a bloody Lancer." 
"If I'd my rights I'm Squire's heir." 
"By rights I'd be a millionaire." 
"By rights I'd be the lord of you, 
But Farmer Scriggins had his do, 
He done me, so I've had to hoove it, 
I've got it all wrote down to prove it. 
And one of these dark winter nights 
He'll lear...Read More

by Browning, Robert
...uine
Who still preferred some slim four-year-old
To the big-boned stock of mighty Berold,
And, fur strong Cotnar, drank French weak wine,
He also umst be such a lady's scorner!
Smooth Jacob still rubs homely Esau:
Now up, now down, the world's one see-saw.
---So, I shall find out some snug corner
Under a hedge, like Orson the wood-knight,
Turn myself round and bid the world good night;
And sleep a sound sleep till the trumpet's blowing
Wakes me (unless priests cheat us la...Read More

by Scott, Sir Walter
...ain-air;
     The Fleming there despised the soil
     That paid so ill the labourer's toil;
     Their rolls showed French and German name;
     And merry England's exiles came,
     To share, with ill-concealed disdain,
     Of Scotland's pay the scanty gain.
     All brave in arms, well trained to wield
     The heavy halberd, brand, and shield;
     In camps licentious, wild, and bold;
     In pillage fierce and uncontrolled;
     And now, by holytide and feast...Read More

by Chaucer, Geoffrey
...gree". It is
characteristic that the somewhat pompous Sergeant of Law
should couch his assent in the semi-barbarous French, then
familiar in law procedure.

4. Ceyx and Alcyon: Chaucer treats of these in the introduction
to the poem called "The Book of the Duchess." It relates to the
death of Blanche, wife of John of Gaunt, Duke of Lancaster, the
poet's patron, and afterwards his connexion by marriage.

5. The Saintes Legend of Cupid: Now called "The L...Read More

by Chaucer, Geoffrey
...

6. Barm-cloth: apron; from Anglo-Saxon "barme," bosom or
lap.

7. Volupere: Head-gear, kerchief; from French, "envelopper,"
to wrap up.

8. Popelet: Puppet; but chiefly; young wench.

9. Noble: nobles were gold coins of especial purity and
brightness; "Ex auro nobilissimi, unde nobilis vocatus," (made
from the noblest (purest) gold, and therefore called nobles) says
Vossius.

10. Yern: Shrill, lively; German, "gern," willingly, cheerf...Read More

by Levine, Philip
...On March 1, 1958, four deserters from the French Army of North Africa, 
August Rein, Henri Bruette, Jack Dauville, & Thomas Delain, robbed a 
government pay station at Orleansville. Because of the subsequent 
confession of Dauville the other three were captured or shot. Dauville 
was given his freedom and returned to the land of his birth, the U.S.A.

AUGUST REIN: 
from a last ca...Read More

by Tebb, Barry
...s together. Our sandalled

Bearded neighbour was the first to complain, his teacher wife beside him,

The next-door French widow supporting, “So numerous the children, n’est ce pas?”

Meaning “Don’t encourage the Pakis, there are too many already.”

Like thunder the row erupted, a streetful of shouting, my voice the loudest,

The yesses had it, the children remained, our last real garden.



VI1

in memory of Emily Bronte



I

Besieged, beaten and bruised

I had ...Read More

by Angelou, Maya
...
So say the Asian, the Hispanic, the Jew,
The African and Native American, the Sioux,
The Catholic, the Muslim, the French, the Greek,
The Irish, the Rabbi, the Priest, the Sheikh,
The Gay, the Straight, the Preacher,
The privileged, the homeless, the teacher.
They hear. They all hear
The speaking of the tree.
Today, the first and last of every tree
Speaks to humankind. Come to me, here beside the river.
Plant yourself beside me, here beside the river....Read More

by Byron, George (Lord)
...away his eyes as heretofore: 
There Paddy brogued, 'By Jasus!' — 'What's your wull?' 
The temperate Scot exclaim'd: the French ghost swore 
In certain terms I shan't translate in full, 
As the first coachman will; and 'midst the roar, 
The voice of Jonathan was heard to express, 
'Our president is going to war, I guess.' 

LX 

Besides there were the Spaniard, Dutch, and Dane; 
In short, an universal shoal of shades, 
From Otaheite's isle to Salisbury Plain, 
Of all clime...Read More

by Eliot, T S (Thomas Stearns)
...a merchant
Unshaven, with a pocket full of currants 
C.i.f. London: documents at sight,
Asked me in demotic French
To luncheon at the Cannon Street Hotel
Followed by a weekend at the Metropole.
 At the violet hour, when the eyes and back
Turn upward from the desk, when the human engine waits
Like a taxi throbbing waiting,
I Tiresias, though blind, throbbing between two lives,
Old man with wrinkled female breasts, can see
At the violet hour, the evening hour th...Read More

by Chaucer, Geoffrey
...4. Dan: Lord; Latin, "dominus." Another reading is "the wise
man, King Solomon."

5. Defended: forbade; French, "defendre," to prohibit.

6. Dart: the goal; a spear or dart was set up to mark the point of
victory.

7. "But in a great house there are not only vessels of gold and
silver, but also of wood and of earth; and some to honour, and
some to dishonour." -- 2 Tim. ii 20.

8. Jesus feeding the multitude with barley bread: Ma...Read More

Dont forget to view our wonderful member French poems.