Get Your Premium Membership

Best Famous Gibbon Poems

Here is a collection of the all-time best famous Gibbon poems. This is a select list of the best famous Gibbon poetry. Reading, writing, and enjoying famous Gibbon poetry (as well as classical and contemporary poems) is a great past time. These top poems are the best examples of gibbon poems.

Search for the best famous Gibbon poems, articles about Gibbon poems, poetry blogs, or anything else Gibbon poem related using the PoetrySoup search engine at the top of the page.

See Also:

Poems are below...



Written by George (Lord) Byron | Create an image from this poem

Sonnet to Lake Leman

 Rousseau -- Voltaire -- our Gibbon -- De Sta?l -- 
Leman! these names are worthy of thy shore, 
Thy shore of names like these! wert thou no more, 
Their memory thy remembrance would recall: 
To them thy banks were lovely as to all, 
But they have made them lovelier, for the lore 
Of mighty minds doth hallow in the core 
Of human hearts the ruin of a wall 
Where dwelt the wise and wondrous; but by thee 
How much more, Lake of Beauty! do we feel, 
In sweetly gliding o'er thy crystal sea, 
The wild glow of that not ungentle zeal, 
Which of the heirs of immortality 
Is proud, and makes the breath of glory real!
Written by Robert William Service | Create an image from this poem

Book Lover

 I keep collecting books I know
I'll never, never read;
My wife and daughter tell me so,
And yet I never head.
"Please make me," says some wistful tome, "A wee bit of yourself.
" And so I take my treasure home, And tuck it in a shelf.
And now my very shelves complain; They jam and over-spill.
They say: "Why don't you ease our strain?" "some day," I say, "I will.
" So book by book they plead and sigh; I pick and dip and scan; Then put them back, distrest that I Am such a busy man.
Now, there's my Boswell and my Sterne, my Gibbon and Defoe; To savour Swift I'll never learn, Montaigne I may not know.
On Bacon I will never sup, For Shakespeare I've no time; Because I'm busy making up These jingly bits of rhyme.
Chekov is caviare to me, While Stendhal makes me snore; Poor Proust is not my cup of tea, And Balzac is a bore.
I have their books, I love their names, And yet alas! they head, With Lawrence, Joyce and Henry James, My Roster of Unread.
I think it would be very well If I commit a crime, And get put in a prison cell And not allowed to rhyme; Yet given all these worthy books According to my need, I now caress with loving looks, But never, never read.