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Best Famous Emu Poems

Here is a collection of the all-time best famous Emu poems. This is a select list of the best famous Emu poetry. Reading, writing, and enjoying famous Emu poetry (as well as classical and contemporary poems) is a great past time. These top poems are the best examples of emu poems.

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Written by Edward Taylor | Create an image from this poem

Non-Stop

 It seemed as if the enormous journey 
was finally approaching its conclusion.
From the window of the train the last trees were dissipating, a child-like sailor waved once, a seal-like dog barked and died.
The conductor entered the lavatory and was not seen again, although his harmonica-playing was appreciated.
He was not without talent, some said.
A botanist with whom I had become acquainted actually suggested we form a group or something.
I was looking for a familiar signpost in his face, or a landmark that would indicate the true colors of his tribe.
But, alas, there was not a glass of water anywhere or even the remains of a trail.
I got a bewildered expression of my own and slinked to the back of the car where a nun started to tickle me.
She confided to me that it was her cowboy pride that got her through .
.
.
Through what? I thought, but drew my hand close to my imaginary vest.
"That's a beautiful vest," she said, as I began crawling down the aisle.
At last, I pressed my face against the window: A little fog was licking its chop, as was the stationmaster licking something.
We didn't stop.
We didn't appear to be arriving, and yet we were almost out of landscape.
No creeks or rivers.
Nothing even remotely reminding one of a mound.
O mound! Thou ain't around no more.
A heap of abstract geometrical symbols, that's what it's coming to, I thought.
A nothing you could sink your teeth into.
"Relief's on the way," a little know-nothing boy said to me.
"Imagine my surprise," I said and reached out to muss his hair.
But he had no hair and it felt unlucky touching his skull like that.
"Forget what I said," he said.
"What did you say?" I asked in automatic compliance.
And then it got very dark and quiet.
I closed my eyes and dreamed of an emu I once loved.
Written by James Tate | Create an image from this poem

Non-Stop

 It seemed as if the enormous journey 
was finally approaching its conclusion.
From the window of the train the last trees were dissipating, a child-like sailor waved once, a seal-like dog barked and died.
The conductor entered the lavatory and was not seen again, although his harmonica-playing was appreciated.
He was not without talent, some said.
A botanist with whom I had become acquainted actually suggested we form a group or something.
I was looking for a familiar signpost in his face, or a landmark that would indicate the true colors of his tribe.
But, alas, there was not a glass of water anywhere or even the remains of a trail.
I got a bewildered expression of my own and slinked to the back of the car where a nun started to tickle me.
She confided to me that it was her cowboy pride that got her through .
.
.
Through what? I thought, but drew my hand close to my imaginary vest.
"That's a beautiful vest," she said, as I began crawling down the aisle.
At last, I pressed my face against the window: A little fog was licking its chop, as was the stationmaster licking something.
We didn't stop.
We didn't appear to be arriving, and yet we were almost out of landscape.
No creeks or rivers.
Nothing even remotely reminding one of a mound.
O mound! Thou ain't around no more.
A heap of abstract geometrical symbols, that's what it's coming to, I thought.
A nothing you could sink your teeth into.
"Relief's on the way," a little know-nothing boy said to me.
"Imagine my surprise," I said and reached out to muss his hair.
But he had no hair and it felt unlucky touching his skull like that.
"Forget what I said," he said.
"What did you say?" I asked in automatic compliance.
And then it got very dark and quiet.
I closed my eyes and dreamed of an emu I once loved.
Written by Oodgeroo Noonuccal | Create an image from this poem

We Are Going

 They came in to the little town 
A semi-naked band subdued and silent 
All that remained of their tribe.
They came here to the place of their old bora ground Where now the many white men hurry about like ants.
Notice of the estate agent reads: 'Rubbish May Be Tipped Here'.
Now it half covers the traces of the old bora ring.
'We are as strangers here now, but the white tribe are the strangers.
We belong here, we are of the old ways.
We are the corroboree and the bora ground, We are the old ceremonies, the laws of the elders.
We are the wonder tales of Dream Time, the tribal legends told.
We are the past, the hunts and the laughing games, the wandering camp fires.
We are the lightening bolt over Gaphembah Hill Quick and terrible, And the Thunderer after him, that loud fellow.
We are the quiet daybreak paling the dark lagoon.
We are the shadow-ghosts creeping back as the camp fires burn low.
We are nature and the past, all the old ways Gone now and scattered.
The scrubs are gone, the hunting and the laughter.
The eagle is gone, the emu and the kangaroo are gone from this place.
The bora ring is gone.
The corroboree is gone.
And we are going.
'
Written by Andrew Barton Paterson | Create an image from this poem

Johnson's Antidote

 Down along the Snakebite River, where the overlanders camp, 
Where the serpents are in millions, all of the most deadly stamp; 
Where the station-cook in terror, nearly every time he bakes, 
Mixes up among the doughboys half-a-dozen poison-snakes: 
Where the wily free-selector walks in armour-plated pants, 
And defies the stings of scorpions, and the bites of bull-dog ants: 
Where the adder and the viper tear each other by the throat,— 
There it was that William Johnson sought his snake-bite antidote.
Johnson was a free-selector, and his brain went rather *****, For the constant sight of serpents filled him with a deadly fear; So he tramped his free-selection, morning, afternoon, and night, Seeking for some great specific that would cure the serpent’s bite.
Till King Billy, of the Mooki, chieftain of the flour-bag head, Told him, “Spos’n snake bite pfeller, pfeller mostly drop down dead; Spos’n snake bite old goanna, then you watch a while you see, Old goanna cure himself with eating little pfeller tree.
” “That’s the cure,” said William Johnson, “point me out this plant sublime,” But King Billy, feeling lazy, said he’d go another time.
Thus it came to pass that Johnson, having got the tale by rote, Followed every stray goanna, seeking for the antidote.
.
.
.
.
.
Loafing once beside the river, while he thought his heart would break, There he saw a big goanna fighting with a tiger-snake, In and out they rolled and wriggled, bit each other, heart and soul, Till the valiant old goanna swallowed his opponent whole.
Breathless, Johnson sat and watched him, saw him struggle up the bank, Saw him nibbling at the branches of some bushes, green and rank; Saw him, happy and contented, lick his lips, as off he crept, While the bulging in his stomach showed where his opponent slept.
Then a cheer of exultation burst aloud from Johnson’s throat; “Luck at last,” said he, “I’ve struck it! ’tis the famous antidote.
“Here it is, the Grand Elixir, greatest blessing ever known,— Twenty thousand men in India die each year of snakes alone.
Think of all the foreign nations, negro, chow, and blackamoor, Saved from sudden expiration, by my wondrous snakebite cure.
It will bring me fame and fortune! In the happy days to be, Men of every clime and nation will be round to gaze on me— Scientific men in thousands, men of mark and men of note, Rushing down the Mooki River, after Johnson’s antidote.
It will cure delirium tremens, when the patient’s eyeballs stare At imaginary spiders, snakes which really are not there.
When he thinks he sees them wriggle, when he thinks he sees them bloat, It will cure him just to think of Johnson’s Snakebite Antidote.
” Then he rushed to the museum, found a scientific man— “Trot me out a deadly serpent, just the deadliest you can; I intend to let him bite me, all the risk I will endure, Just to prove the sterling value of my wondrous snakebite cure.
Even though an adder bit me, back to life again I’d float; Snakes are out of date, I tell you, since I’ve found the antidote.
” Said the scientific person, “If you really want to die, Go ahead—but, if you’re doubtful, let your sheep-dog have a try.
Get a pair of dogs and try it, let the snake give both a nip; Give your dog the snakebite mixture, let the other fellow rip; If he dies and yours survives him, then it proves the thing is good.
Will you fetch your dog and try it?” Johnson rather thought he would.
So he went and fetched his canine, hauled him forward by the throat.
“Stump, old man,” says he, “we’ll show them we’ve the genwine antidote.
” Both the dogs were duly loaded with the poison-gland’s contents; Johnson gave his dog the mixture, then sat down to wait events.
“Mark,” he said, “in twenty minutes Stump’ll be a-rushing round, While the other wretched creature lies a corpse upon the ground.
” But, alas for William Johnson! ere they’d watched a half-hour’s spell Stumpy was as dead as mutton, t’other dog was live and well.
And the scientific person hurried off with utmost speed, Tested Johnson’s drug and found it was a deadly poison-weed; Half a tumbler killed an emu, half a spoonful killed a goat, All the snakes on earth were harmless to that awful antidote.
.
.
.
.
.
Down along the Mooki River, on the overlanders’ camp, Where the serpents are in millions, all of the most deadly stamp, Wanders, daily, William Johnson, down among those poisonous hordes, Shooting every stray goanna, calls them “black and yaller frauds”.
And King Billy, of the Mooki, cadging for the cast-off coat, Somehow seems to dodge the subject of the snake-bite antidote.
Written by Andrew Barton Paterson | Create an image from this poem

In the Droving Days

 "Only a pound," said the auctioneer, 
"Only a pound; and I'm standing here 
Selling this animal, gain or loss -- 
Only a pound for the drover's horse? 
One of the sort that was ne'er afraid, 
One of the boys of the Old Brigade; 
Thoroughly honest and game, I'll swear, 
Only a little the worse for wear; 
Plenty as bad to be seen in town, 
Give me a bid and I'll knock him down; 
Sold as he stands, and without recourse, 
Give me a bid for the drover's horse.
" Loitering there in an aimless way Somehow I noticed the poor old grey, Weary and battered and screwed, of course; Yet when I noticed the old grey horse, The rough bush saddle, and single rein Of the bridle laid on his tangled mane, Straighway the crowd and the auctioneer Seemed on a sudden to disappear, Melted away in a kind if haze -- For my heart went back to the droving days.
Back to the road, and I crossed again Over the miles of the saltbush plain -- The shining plain that is said to be The dried-up bed of an inland sea.
Where the air so dry and so clear and bright Refracts the sun with a wondrous light, And out in the dim horizon makes The deep blue gleam of the phantom lakes.
At dawn of day we could feel the breeze That stirred the boughs of the sleeping trees, And brought a breath of the fragrance rare That comes and goes in that scented air; For the trees and grass and the shrubs contain A dry sweet scent on the saltbush plain.
for those that love it and understand The saltbush plain is a wonderland, A wondrous country, were Nature's ways Were revealed to me in the droving days.
We saw the fleet wild horses pass, And kangaroos through the Mitchell grass; The emu ran with her frightened brood All unmolested and unpursued.
But there rose a shout and a wild hubbub When the dingo raced for his native scrub, And he paid right dear for his stolen meals With the drovers' dogs at his wretched heels.
For we ran him down at a rattling pace, While the pack-horse joined in the stirring chase.
And a wild halloo at the kill we'd raise -- We were light of heart in the droving days.
'Twas a drover's horse, and my hand again Made a move to close on a fancied rein.
For I felt a swing and the easy stride Of the grand old horse that I used to ride.
In drought or plenty, in good or ill, The same old steed was my comrade still; The old grey horse with his honest ways Was a mate to me in the droving days.
When we kept our watch in the cold and damp, If the cattle broke from the sleeping camp, Over the flats and across the plain, With my head bent down on his waving mane, Through the boughs above and the stumps below, On the darkest night I could let him go At a racing speed; he would choose his course, And my life was safe with the old grey horse.
But man and horse had a favourite job, When an outlaw broke from the station mob; With a right good will was the stockwhip plied, As the old horse raced at the straggler's side, And the greenhide whip such a weal would raise -- We could use the whip in the droving days.
----------------- "Only a pound!" and was this the end -- Only a pound for the drover's friend.
The drover's friend that has seen his day, And now was worthless and cast away With a broken knee and a broken heart To be flogged and starved in a hawker's cart.
Well, I made a bid for a sense of shame And the memories of the good old game.
"Thank you? Guinea! and cheap at that! Against you there in the curly hat! Only a guinea, and one more chance, Down he goes if there's no advance, Third, and last time, one! two! three!" And the old grey horse was knocked down to me.
And now he's wandering, fat and sleek, On the lucerne flats by the Homestead Creek; I dare not ride him for fear he's fall, But he does a journey to beat them all, For though he scarcely a trot can raise, He can take me back to the droving days.
Written by Andrew Barton Paterson | Create an image from this poem

Santa Claus in the Bush

 It chanced out back at the Christmas time, 
When the wheat was ripe and tall, 
A stranger rode to the farmer's gate -- 
A sturdy man and a small.
"Rin doon, rin doon, my little son Jack, And bid the stranger stay; And we'll hae a crack for Auld Lang Syne, For the morn is Christmas Day.
" "Nay noo, nay noo," said the dour guidwife, "But ye should let him be; He's maybe only a drover chap Frae the land o' the Darling Pea.
"Wi' a drover's tales, and a drover's thirst To swiggle the hail nicht through; Or he's maybe a life assurance carle To talk ye black and blue," "Guidwife, he's never a drover chap, For their swags are neat and thin; And he's never a life assurance carle, Wi' the brick-dust burnt in his skin.
"Guidwife, guidwife, be nae sae dour, For the wheat stands ripe and tall, And we shore a seven-pound fleece this year, Ewes and weaners and all.
"There is grass tae spare, and the stock are fat.
Where they whiles are gaunt and thin, And we owe a tithe to the travelling poor, So we maun ask him in.
"Ye can set him a chair tae the table side, And gi' him a bite tae eat; An omelette made of a new-laid egg, Or a tasty bit of meat.
" "But the native cats have taen the fowls, They havena left a leg; And he'll get nae omelette at a' Till the emu lays an egg!" "Rin doon, rin doon, my little son Jack, To whaur the emus bide, Ye shall find the auld hen on the nest, While the auld cock sits beside.
"But speak them fair, and speak them saft, Lest they kick ye a fearsome jolt.
Ye can gi' them a feed of thae half-inch nails Or a rusty carriage bolt.
" So little son Jack ran blithely down With the rusty nails in hand, Till he came where the emus fluffed and scratched By their nest in the open sand.
And there he has gathered the new-laid egg -- 'Twould feed three men or four -- And the emus came for the half-inch nails Right up to the settler's door.
"A waste o' food," said the dour guidwife, As she took the egg, with a frown, "But he gets nae meat, unless ye rin A paddy-melon down.
" "Gang oot, gang oot, my little son Jack, Wi' your twa-three doggies sma'; Gin ye come nae back wi' a paddy-melon, Then come nae back at a'.
" So little son Jack he raced and he ran, And he was bare o' the feet, And soon he captured a paddy-melon, Was gorged with the stolen wheat.
"Sit doon, sit doon, my bonny wee man, To the best that the hoose can do -- An omelette made of the emu egg And a paddy-melon stew.
" "'Tis well, 'tis well," said the bonny wee man; "I have eaten the wide world's meat, And the food that is given with right good-will Is the sweetest food to eat.
"But the night draws on to the Christmas Day And I must rise and go, For I have a mighty way to ride To the land of the Esquimaux.
"And it's there I must load my sledges up, With the reindeers four-in-hand, That go to the North, South, East, and West, To every Christian land.
" "Tae the Esquimaux," said the dour guidwife, "Ye suit my husband well!" For when he gets up on his journey horse He's a bit of a liar himsel'.
" Then out with a laugh went the bonny wee man To his old horse grazing nigh, And away like a meteor flash they went Far off to the Northern sky.
When the children woke on the Christmas morn They chattered with might and main -- For a sword and gun had little son Jack, And a braw new doll had Jane, And a packet o' screws had the twa emus; But the dour guidwife gat nane.
Written by Andrew Barton Paterson | Create an image from this poem

An Emu Hunt

 West of Dubbo the west begins 
The land of leisure and hope and trust, 
Where the black man stalks with his dogs and gins 
And Nature visits the settlers' sins 
With the Bogan shower, that is mostly dust.
When the roley-poley's roots dry out With the fierce hot winds and the want of rain, They come uprooted and bound about And dance in a wild fantastic rout Like flying haystacks across the plain.
And the horses shudder and snort and shift As the bounding mass of weeds goes past, But the emus never their heads uplift As they look for roots in the sandy drift, For the emus know it from first to last.
Now, the boss's dog that had come from town Was strange to the wild and woolly west, And he thought he would earn him some great renown When he saw, on the wastes of the open down, An emu standing beside her nest.
And he said to himself as he stalked his prey To start on his first great emu hunt, "I must show some speed when she runs away, For emus kick very hard, they say; But I can't be kicked if I keep in front.
" The emu chickens made haste to flee As he barked and he snarled and he darted around, But the emu looked at him scornfully And put an end to his warlike glee With a kick that lifted him off the ground.
And when, with an injured rib or two, He made for home with a chastened mind, An old dog told him, "I thought you knew An emu kicks like a kangaroo, And you can't get hurt -- if you keep behind.
"
Written by Andrew Barton Paterson | Create an image from this poem

Saltbush Bills Gamecock

 'Twas Saltbush Bill, with his travelling sheep, was making his way to town; 
He crossed them over the Hard Times Run, and he came to the Take 'Em Down; 
He counted through at the boundary gate, and camped at the drafting yard: 
For Stingy Smith, of the Hard Times Run, had hunted him rather hard.
He bore no malice to Stingy Smith -- 'twas simply the hand of Fate That caused his waggon to swerve aside and shatter old Stingy's gate; And being only the hand of Fate, it follows, without a doubt, It wasn't the fault of Saltbush Bill that Stingy's sheep got out.
So Saltbush Bill, with an easy heart, prepared for what might befall, Commenced his stages on Take 'Em Down, the station of Roostr Hall.
'Tis strange how often the men out back will take to some curious craft, Some ruling passion to keep their thoughts away from the overdraft: And Rooster Hall, of the Take 'Em Down, was widely known to fame As breeder of champion fighting cocks -- his forte was the British Game.
The passing stranger within his gates that camped with old Rooster Hall Was forced to talk about fowls all noght, or else not talk at all.
Though droughts should come, and though sheep should die, his fowls were his sole delight; He left his shed in the flood of work to watch two game-cocks fight.
He held in scorn the Australian Game, that long-legged child of sin; In a desperate fight, with the steel-tipped spurs, the British Game must win! The Australian bird was a mongrel bird, with a touch of the jungle cock; The want of breeding must find him out, when facing the English stock; For British breeding, and British pluck, must triumph it over all -- And that was the root of the simple creed that governed old Rooster Hall.
'Twas Saltbush Bill to the station rode ahead of his travelling sheep, And sent a message to Rooster Hall that wakened him out of his sleep -- A crafty message that fetched him out, and hurried him as he came -- "A drover has an Australian bird to match with your British Game.
" 'Twas done, and done in half a trice; a five-pound note a side; Old Rooster Hall, with his champion bird, and the drover's bird untried.
"Steel spurs, of course?" said old Rooster Hall; "you'll need 'em, without a doubt!" "You stick the spurs on your bird!" said Bill, "but mine fights best without.
" "Fights best without?" said old Rooster Hall; "he can't fight best unspurred! You must be crazy!" But Saltbush Bill said, "Wait till you see my bird!" So Rooster Hall to his fowl-yard went, and quickly back he came, Bearing a clipt and a shaven cock, the pride of his English Game; With an eye as fierce as an eaglehawk, and a crow like a trumbet call, He strutted about on the garden walk, and cackled at Rooster Hall.
Then Rooster Hall sent off a boy with a word to his cronies two, McCrae (the boss of the Black Police) and Father Donahoo.
Full many a cockfight old McCrae had held in his empty Court, With Father D.
as the picker-up -- a regular all-round Sport! They got the message of Rooster Hall, and down to his run they came, Prepared to scoff at the drover's bird, and to bet on the English Game; They hied them off to the drover's camp, while Saltbush rode before -- Old Rooster Hall was a blithsome man, when he thought of the treat in store.
They reached the camp, where the drover's cook, with countenance all serene, Was boiling beef in an iron pot, but never a fowl was seen.
"Take off the beef from the fire," said Bill, "and wait till you see the fight; There's something fresh for the bill-of-fare -- there's game-fowl stew tonight! For Mister Hall has a fighting cock, all feathered and clipped and spurred; And he's fetched him here, for a bit of sport, to fight our Australian bird.
I've made a match for our pet will win, though he's hardly a fighting cock, But he's game enough, and it's many a mile that he's tramped with the travelling stock.
" The cook he banged on a saucepan lid; and, soon as the sound was heard, Under the dray, in the shallow hid, a something moved and stirred: A great tame emu strutted out.
Said Saltbush, "Here's our bird!" Bur Rooster Hall, and his cronies two, drove home without a word.
The passing stranger within his gates that camps with old Rooster Hall Must talk about something else than fowls, if he wishes to talk at all.
For the record lies in the local Court, and filed in its deepest vault, That Peter Hall, of the Take 'Em Down, was tried for a fierce assault On a stranger man, who, in all good faith, and prompted by what he heard, Had asked old Hall if a British Game could beat an Australian bird; And Old McCrae, who was on the bench, as soon as the case was tried, Remarked, "Discharged with a clean discharge -- the assault was justified!"