Famous Beetle Poems by Famous Poets

These are examples of famous Beetle poems written by well-known modern and classical poets. PoetrySoup is a great educational poetry resource of famous beetle poems.

These examples illustrate what a famous beetle poem looks like and its form, scheme, or style (where appropriate). The poems may also contain the word 'beetle'.

Don't forget to view our Member Beetle Poems. You can find great beetle poems there too.

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by Dickinson, Emily
A bird came down the walk:
He did not know I saw;
He bit an angle-worm in halves
And ate the fellow, raw.

And then he drank a dew
From a convenient grass,
And then hopped...Read More
by Wilde, Oscar
 I.

He was a Grecian lad, who coming home
With pulpy figs and wine from Sicily
Stood at his galley's prow, and let the foam
Blow through his crisp brown curls unconsciously,
And holding...Read More
by Tennyson, Alfred Lord
 At break of day the College Portress came: 
She brought us Academic silks, in hue 
The lilac, with a silken hood to each, 
And zoned with gold; and now...Read More
by Browning, Robert
 (PETER RONSARD _loquitur_.)

``Heigho!'' yawned one day King Francis,
``Distance all value enhances!
``When a man's busy, why, leisure
``Strikes him as wonderful pleasure:
`` 'Faith, and at leisure once is he?
``Straightway he wants...Read More
by Gray, Thomas
 The curfew tolls the knell of parting day,
The lowing herd wind slowly o'er the lea,
The ploughman homeward plods his weary way,
And leaves the world to darkness and to me.

Now...Read More
by Crowley, Aleister
 [Dedicated to General J.C.F. Fuller]


Velvet soft the night-star glowed 
Over the untrodden road, 
Through the giant glades of yew 
Where its ray fell light as dew 
Lighting up the...Read More
by Keats, John
NO no! go not to Lethe neither twist 
Wolf's-bane tight-rooted for its poisonous wine; 
Nor suffer thy pale forehead to be kist 
By nightshade ruby grape of Proserpine; 
Make not...Read More
by Jackson, Helen Hunt
 Once a dream did weave a shade,
O'er my Angel-guarded bed.
That an Emmet lost it's way
Where on grass methought I lay.

Troubled wildered and forlorn
Dark benighted travel-worn,
Over many a tangled spray,
All...Read More
by Montgomery, Lucy Maud
 My Claudia, it is long since we have met, 
So kissed, so held each other heart to heart! 
I thought to greet thee as a conqueror comes, 
Bearing the...Read More
by Hood, Thomas
 Oh, very gloomy is the house of woe,
Where tears are falling while the bell is knelling,
With all the dark solemnities that show
That Death is in the dwelling!

Oh, very, very...Read More
by Collins, Billy
 It is possible to be struck by a
meteor or a single-engine plane while
reading in a chair at home. Pedestrians
are flattened by safes falling from
rooftops mostly within the panels of
the...Read More
by Ammons, A R
 You'll rejoice at how many kinds of shit there are:
gosling shit (which J. Williams said something
was as green as), fish shit (the generality), trout

shit, rainbow trout shit (for the...Read More
by Smart, Christopher
 Rejoice in God, O ye Tongues; give the glory to the Lord, and the Lamb. 

Nations, and languages, and every Creature, in which is the breath of Life. 

Let...Read More
by Muldoon, Paul
 Even as we speak, there's a smoker's cough
from behind the whitethorn hedge: we stop dead in our tracks;
a distant tingle of water into a trough.

In the past half-hour—since a...Read More
by Bukowski, Charles
 we have everything and we have nothing
and some men do it in churches
and some men do it by tearing butterflies
in half
and some men do it in Palm Springs
laying it...Read More
by Smart, Christopher
 Let Elizur rejoice with the Partridge, who is a prisoner of state and is proud of his keepers. 

Let Shedeur rejoice with Pyrausta, who dwelleth in a medium of...Read More
by Browning, Robert
 I. THE FLOWER'S NAME

Here's the garden she walked across,
Arm in my arm, such a short while since:
Hark, now I push its wicket, the moss
Hinders the hinges and makes them...Read More
by Lawrence, David Herbert
 The Cross, the Cross
Goes deeper in than we know,
Deeper into life;
Right into the marrow
And through the bone.
Along the back of the baby tortoise
The scales are locked in an arch...Read More
by Tennyson, Alfred Lord
 Where Claribel low-lieth
The breezes pause and die,
Letting the rose-leaves fall:
But the solemn oak-tree sigheth,
Thick-leaved, ambrosial,
With an ancient melody
Of an inward agony,
Where Claribel low-lieth.

At eve the beetle boometh
Athwart the thicket...Read More
by Doty, Mark
 Glassmakers,
at century's end,
compounded metallic lusters

in reference
to natural sheens (dragonfly
and beetle wings,

marbled light on kerosene)
and invented names
as coolly lustrous

as their products'
scarab-gleam: Quetzal,
Aurene, Favrile.

Suggesting,
respectively, the glaze
of feathers,

that sun-shot fog
of which halos
are...Read More
by Rich, Adrienne
 She had thought the studio would keep itself;
no dust upon the furniture of love.
Half heresy, to wish the taps less vocal,
the panes relieved of grime. A plate of pears,
a...Read More
by Smart, Christopher
 For God has given us a language of monosyllables to prevent our clipping. 

For a toad enjoys a finer prospect than another creature to compensate his lack. 

Tho' toad...Read More
by de la Mare, Walter
 Some one came knocking
At my wee, small door;
Someone came knocking;
I'm sure-sure-sure;
I listened, I opened,
I looked to left and right,
But nought there was a stirring
In the still dark night;
Only the...Read More
by Robinson, Mary Darby
 Swift, o'er the wild and dreary waste
A NUT-BROWN GIRL was seen to haste;
Wide waving was her unbound hair,
And sun-scorch'd was her bosom bare;
For Summer's noon had shed its beams
While...Read More
by Scott, Sir Walter
 O, Brignall banks are wild and fair, 
And Greta woods are green, 
And you may gather garlands there, 
Would grace a summer queen: 
And as I rode by Dalton...Read More
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Dont forget to view our wonderful member Beetle poems.