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Famous Amity Poems by Famous Poets

These are examples of famous Amity poems written by some of the greatest and most-well-known modern and classical poets. PoetrySoup is a great educational poetry resource of famous amity poems. These examples illustrate what a famous amity poem looks like and its form, scheme, or style (where appropriate).

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by Browning, Robert
...ing you'll crown yourself with, all your days, 
Is--dining here and drinking this last glass 
I pour you out in sign of amity 
Before we part for ever. Of your power 
And social influence, worldly worth in short, 
Judge what's my estimation by the fact, 
I do not condescend to enjoin, beseech, 
Hint secrecy on one of all these words! 
You're shrewd and know that should you publish one 
The world would brand the lie--my enemies first, 
Who'd sneer--"the bishop's an arch-hy...Read More



by Herbert, George
...And all to all the world besides:
     Each part may call the furthest, brother;
For head with foot hath private amity,
          And both with moons and tides.

          Nothing hath got so far,
But man hath caught and kept it, as his prey.
     His eyes dismount the highest star:
     He is in little all the sphere.
Herbs gladly cure our flesh, because that they
          Find their acquaintance there.

          For us the winds do blow,
...Read More

by Brautigan, Richard
...another, 
And all to all the world besides: 
Each part may call the farthest brother: 
For head with foot hath private amity, 
And both with moons and tides. 

Nothing hath got so far, 
But Man hath caught and kept it, as his prey. 
His eyes dismount the highest star: 
He is in little all the sphere. 
Herbs gladly cure our flesh; because that they 
Find their acquaintance there. 

For us the winds do blow, 
The earth doth rest, heav'n move, and fountains flow...Read More

by Taylor, Edward
...that I didn't, and the clock is running
out on his sort of behavior. I'm napping in a wigwam
as I write this, near Amity Street, which is buried
under fifteen feet of ashes and cinders and rocks.
Moss and a certain herblike creature are beginning to
whisper nearby. I am beside myself, peering down,
senselessly, since, for us, in space, there is
neither above nor below; and thus the expression
"He is being nibbled to death by ducks" shines
with such style, such po...Read More

by Tate, James
...that I didn't, and the clock is running
out on his sort of behavior. I'm napping in a wigwam
as I write this, near Amity Street, which is buried
under fifteen feet of ashes and cinders and rocks.
Moss and a certain herblike creature are beginning to
whisper nearby. I am beside myself, peering down,
senselessly, since, for us, in space, there is
neither above nor below; and thus the expression
"He is being nibbled to death by ducks" shines
with such style, such po...Read More



by Milton, John
...d; yet no purposed foe 
To you, whom I could pity thus forlorn, 
Though I unpitied: League with you I seek, 
And mutual amity, so strait, so close, 
That I with you must dwell, or you with me 
Henceforth; my dwelling haply may not please, 
Like this fair Paradise, your sense; yet such 
Accept your Maker's work; he gave it me, 
Which I as freely give: Hell shall unfold, 
To entertain you two, her widest gates, 
And send forth all her kings; there will be room, 
Not like these ...Read More

by Milton, John
...n, and beget 
Like of his like, his image multiplied, 
In unity defective; which requires 
Collateral love, and dearest amity. 
Thou in thy secresy although alone, 
Best with thyself accompanied, seekest not 
Social communication; yet, so pleased, 
Canst raise thy creature to what highth thou wilt 
Of union or communion, deified: 
I, by conversing, cannot these erect 
From prone; nor in their ways complacence find. 
Thus I emboldened spake, and freedom used 
Permissiv...Read More

by Milton, John
...ep; whatever draws me on, 
Or sympathy, or some connatural force, 
Powerful at greatest distance to unite, 
With secret amity, things of like kind, 
By secretest conveyance. Thou, my shade 
Inseparable, must with me along; 
For Death from Sin no power can separate. 
But, lest the difficulty of passing back 
Stay his return perhaps over this gulf 
Impassable, impervious; let us try 
Adventurous work, yet to thy power and mine 
Not unagreeable, to found a path 
Over thi...Read More

by Marvell, Andrew
...thos to a Man:
And carve in their large Bodies, where they please,
The Armes of the United Provinces.
But when such Amity at home is show'd;
What then are their confederacies abroad?
Let this one court'sie witness all the rest;
When their hole Navy they together prest,
Not Christian Captives to redeem from Bands:
Or intercept the Western golden Sands:
No, but all ancient Rights and Leagues must vail,
Rather then to the English strike their sail;
to whom their weather-beat...Read More

by Thompson, Francis
...se early, few sit long:
In how differing accents hear the throng
His great Pentecostal tongue;

"Who know not love from amity,
Nor my reported self from me;
A fair fit gift is this, meseems,
You give -- this withering flower of dreams.

"O frankly fickle, and fickly true,
Do you know what the days will do to you?
To your love and you what the days will do,
O frankly fickle, and fickly true?

"You have loved me, Fair, three lives -- or days:
'Twill pass with the passing of...Read More

by Hardy, Thomas
...mpathy 
Were sown by those more excellent than he, 
 Long known, though long contemned till then - 
 The gods of men in amity. 

VIII 

 Souls have grown seers, and thought out-brings 
The mournful many-sidedness of things 
 With foes as friends, enfeebling ires 
 And fury-fires by gaingivings! 

IX 

 He scarce impassions champions now; 
They do and dare, but tensely--pale of brow; 
 And would they fain uplift the arm 
 Of that faint form they know not how. 

X 

 Ye...Read More

by Whitman, Walt
...one refuse, all attend; 
Armies, ships, antiquities, the dead, libraries, paintings, machines, cities, hate,
 despair,
 amity, pain, theft, murder, aspiration, form in close ranks; 
They debouch as they are wanted to march obediently through the mouth of that man, or that
 woman. 

.... O I see arise orators fit for inland America; 
And I see it is as slow to become an orator as to become a man;
And I see that all power is folded in a great vocalism. 
...Read More

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