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Famous Abate Poems by Famous Poets

These are examples of famous Abate poems written by some of the greatest and most-well-known modern and classical poets. PoetrySoup is a great educational poetry resource of famous abate poems. These examples illustrate what a famous abate poem looks like and its form, scheme, or style (where appropriate).

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by Lowell, Amy
...ne, two, five.
All Venice is a falling of Autumn leaves --
Brown,
And yellow streaked with brown.
"That sonnet, Abate,
Beautiful,
I am quite exhausted by it.
Your phrases turn about my heart
And stifle me to swooning.
Open the window, I beg.
Lord! What a strumming of fiddles and mandolins!
'Tis really a shame to stop indoors.
Call my maid, or I will make you lace me yourself.
Fie, how hot it is, not a breath of air!
See how straight the leaves are ...Read More



by Browning, Elizabeth Barrett
...ight of way:
For almsgiving through a door that is
Not open enough for two friends to kiss:

'For love of freedom which abates
Beyond the Straits:
For patriot virtue starved to vice on
Self-praise, self-interest, and suspicion:

'For an oligarchic parliament,
And bribes well-meant.
What curse to another land assign,
When heavy-souled for the sins of mine?'

'Therefore,' the voice said, 'shalt thou write
My curse to-night.
Because thou hast strength to see and hate
A f...Read More

by Lawrence, D. H.
...e.—But God, how I hate you! 
 Do you fear I shall swindle you? 
Do you think if you take me as I am, that that will abate you 
Somehow?—so sad, so intrinsic, so spiritual, yet so cautious, you 
Must have me all in your will and your consciousness— 
 I hate you....Read More

by Pope, Alexander
...e,
Here with degrees of swiftness, there of force;
All in exact proportion to the state;
Nothing to add, and nothing to abate.
Each beast, each insect, happy in its own:
Is Heav'n unkind to man, and man alone?
Shall he alone, whom rational we call,
Be pleas'd with nothing, if not bless'd with all?


The bliss of man (could pride that blessing find)
Is not to act or think beyond mankind;
No pow'rs of body or of soul to share,
But what his nature and his state can bear....Read More

by Service, Robert William
...iver bar;
But I know, I know, that it's down below that the golden treasures are;
So I'll wait and wait till the floods abate, and I'll sink a shaft once more,
And I'd like to bet that I'll go home yet with a brass band playing before."

He was nigh as thin as a sliver, and he whined like a Moose-hide cur;
 So Clancy clothed him and nursed him as a mother nurses a child;
Lifted him on the toboggan, wrapped him in robes of fur,
 Then with the dogs sore straining started to...Read More



by Keats, John
...ouch'd the knuckles--they unclasp'd--
I caught a finger: but the downward weight
O'erpowered me--it sank. Then 'gan abate
The storm, and through chill aguish gloom outburst
The comfortable sun. I was athirst
To search the book, and in the warming air
Parted its dripping leaves with eager care.
Strange matters did it treat of, and drew on
My soul page after page, till well-nigh won
Into forgetfulness; when, stupefied,
I read these words, and read again, and tried
M...Read More

by Pope, Alexander
...
Here with degrees of swiftness, there of force; 
All in exact proportion to the state; 
Nothing to add, and nothing to abate. 
Each beast, each insect, happy in its own; 
Is Heav'n unkind to Man, and Man alone? 
Shall he alone, whom rational we call, 
Be pleas'd with nothing, if not bless'd with all? 
The bliss of Man (could Pride that blessing find) 
Is not to act or think beyond mankind; 
No pow'rs of body or of soul to share, 
But what his nature and his state can bea...Read More

by Marvell, Andrew
...fear transports them far away, 
And leaden sorrow then their flight did stay. 
See how they each his towering crest abate, 
And the green grass, and their known mangers hate, 
Nor through wide nostrils snuff the wanton air, 
Nor their round hoofs, or curl?d manes compare; 
With wandering eyes, and restless ears they stood, 
And with shrill neighings asked him of the wood. 

Thou, Cromwell, falling, not a stupid tree, 
Or rock so savage, but it mourned for thee: 
And a...Read More

by Bronte, Charlotte
...figure by,­ 
But, moving slow, it faced him straight,
It would not flinch nor quail:
Then first did Gilbert's strength abate,
His stony firmness quail. 

He sank upon his knees and prayed;
The shape stood rigid there;
He called aloud for human aid,
No human aid was near.
An accent strange did thus repeat
Heaven's stern but just decree:
' The measure thou to her didst mete,
To thee shall measured be !' 

Gilbert sprang from his bended knees,
By the pale spectre pushed...Read More

by Thoreau, Henry David
...gainst my will,
My dear friend, I love thee still.
It were treason to our love,
And a sin to God above,
One iota to abate
Of a pure impartial hate....Read More

by Alighieri, Dante
...this blind contending hell. 

 "Beneath the moon there is not gold so great 
 In worth, it could one moment's grief abate, 
 Or rest one only of these weary souls." 

 "Master, this Fortune that ye speak, whose claws 
 Grasp all desirable things of earth," I said, 
 "What is she?" 
 "O betrayed in foolishness I 
 Blindness of creatures born of earth, whose goals 
 Are folly and loss!" he answered, "I would make 
 Thy mouth an opening for this truth I show. 

 "Tra...Read More

by Browning, Robert
...nd eyes uplift
Thro' the darkness and the drift!

XX.

While I---to the shape, I too
Feel my soul dilate
Nor a whit abate,
And relax not a gesture due,
As I see my belief come true.

XXI.

For, there! have I drawn or no
Life to that lip?
Do my fingers dip
In a flame which again they throw
On the cheek that breaks a-glow?

XXII.

Ha! was the hair so first?
What, unfilleted,
Made alive, and spread
Through the void with a rich outburst,
Chestnut gold-interspersed...Read More

by Milton, John
...more?
Extol not riches, then, the toil of fools,
The wise man's cumbrance, if not snare; more apt
To slacken virtue and abate her edge
Than prompt her to do aught may merit praise.
What if with like aversion I reject
Riches and realms! Yet not for that a crown,
Golden in shew, is but a wreath of thorns,
Brings dangers, troubles, cares, and sleepless nights, 
To him who wears the regal diadem,
When on his shoulders each man's burden lies;
For therein stands the office of a...Read More

by Hugo, Victor
..., 1828.} 


 The River Deity upbraids his Daughters, the contributary Streams:— 
 
 Ye daughters mine! will naught abate 
 Your fierce interminable hate? 
 Still am I doomed to rue the fate 
 That such unfriendly neighbors made? 
 The while ye might, in peaceful cheer, 
 Mirror upon your waters clear, 
 Semlin! thy Gothic steeples dear, 
 And thy bright minarets, Belgrade! 
 
 Fraser's Magazine 


 




...Read More

by Marvell, Andrew
...ed Fear transports them far away,
And leaden Sorrow then their flight did stay.
See how they each his towring Crest abate,
And the green Grass, and their known Mangers hate,
Nor through wide Nostrils snuffe the wanton air,
Nor their round Hoofs, or curled Mane'scompare;
With wandring Eyes, and restless Ears theystood,
And with shrill Neighings ask'd him of the Wood.
Thou Cromwell falling, not a stupid Tree,
Or Rock so savage, but it mourn'd for thee:
And all about was...Read More

by Chaucer, Geoffrey
...And have therein vitaille suffisant
But for one day; fie on the remenant;
The water shall aslake* and go away *slacken, abate
Aboute prime* upon the nexte day. *early morning
But Robin may not know of this, thy knave*, *servant
Nor eke thy maiden Gill I may not save:
Ask me not why: for though thou aske me
I will not telle Godde's privity.
Sufficeth thee, *but if thy wit be mad*, *unless thou be
To have as great a grace as Noe had; out of thy wits*
Thy wife shall I we...Read More

by Tennyson, Alfred Lord
...le of that bassoon, my throat; 
Abase those eyes that ever loved to meet 
Star-sisters answering under crescent brows; 
Abate the stride, which speaks of man, and loose 
A flying charm of blushes o'er this cheek, 
Where they like swallows coming out of time 
Will wonder why they came: but hark the bell 
For dinner, let us go!' 
And in we streamed 
Among the columns, pacing staid and still 
By twos and threes, till all from end to end 
With beauties every shade of brown and fa...Read More

by Carroll, Lewis
...

THEY walked beside the wave-worn beach;
Her tongue was very apt to teach,
And now and then he did beseech 

She would abate her dulcet tone,
Because the talk was all her own,
And he was dull as any drone. 

She urged "No cheese is made of chalk":
And ceaseless flowed her dreary talk,
Tuned to the footfall of a walk. 

Her voice was very full and rich,
And, when at length she asked him "Which?"
It mounted to its highest pitch. 

He a bewildered answer gave,
Drown...Read More

by Petrarch, Francesco
...PAN class=i0>Unvaried scene! where neither change nor fate,Nor care, nor sorrow, can our joys abate;Nor finds the light of thought resistance here,More than the sunbeams in a crystal sphere.But no material things can match their flight,In speed excelling far the race of light.Oh! what a glorious lot shall then be mine<...Read More

by Shelley, Percy Bysshe
...rn
Led me & my companions, and relate
The progress of the pageant since the morn;
"If thirst of knowledge doth not thus abate,
Follow it even to the night, but I
Am weary" . . . Then like one who with the weight
Of his own words is staggered, wearily
He paused, and ere he could resume, I cried,
"First who art thou?" . . . "Before thy memory
"I feared, loved, hated, suffered, did, & died,
And if the spark with which Heaven lit my spirit
Earth had with p...Read More

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