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Qasida

Definition

Qasida” or Ghasideh. is a Persian/Arabic style of poetry that follows all the rules and system of rhymes of Ghazal, but it is much longer (from 15 to 100 couplets even more), but unlike the Ghazal, Qasida is not necessarily spiritual. The tone and theme of the Qasida could be an epic poem in the praise, boasting, and satire and blame and other issues such as nature and even ethical and religious. The rhyming of Qasida is like Ghazal AA-BA-CA-DA-EA-FA- GA-HA...and like Ghazal it could be with and without refrain.”
 
The Qasida became popular with the Arab people some time before the rise of Islam. Initially, with the Arabs, a Qasida poem could be as short as fifteen lines or as long as eighty lines. Later on, Persian poets embraced this type of poetry, contributing to its evolution where it could now accommodate more than one hundred lines. Gradually, it became integrated into other cultures in Africa with the movement and expansion of Arab Islam. 
 
A Qasida retains a sole detailed meter in every part of the poem. Each and every line has the same rhythm, meaning that it sounds almost the same throughout. This type of poem is meant to address a particular subject or person. 
 
Qasida, Is a long version Ghazal (usually between 15-100 couplets), with the very regular and perfect number of syllables, but unlike ghazal, it does not have to be spiritual. It is used to give praise to someone or something. Arabs used the poem to praise kings and benefactors who were involved in helping others. It uses a lot of irony, humor, and exaggeration to praise a particular person or just anything in relation to a specific event. 

Qasida” or Ghasideh. is a Persian/Arabic style of poetry that follows all the rules and system of rhymes of Ghazal, but it is much longer (from 15 to 100 couplets even more), but unlike the Ghazal, Qasida is not necessarily spiritual. The tone and theme of the Qasida could be an epic poem in the praise, boasting, and satire and blame and other issues such as nature and even ethical and religious. The rhyming of Qasida is like Ghazal AA-BA-CA-DA-EA-FA- GA-HA...and like Ghazal it could be with and without refrain.”


Example

Salvation… by Pashang Salehi

The nightingale was singing to the moonlight.

The moonlight was showing off all of its bright.

He was singing as though he knows the right path,

Showing everybody how to do it right.

Suddenly, heard a sound like his, but so sad.

So much sadness, so much pain, and full of plight.

The song was all about hardship full of pain,

so much pain and puzzlement, an awful fright.

The Nightingale startled as though, he is caged!

He thought that he's the one singing, it just might.

The sad song was coming from a house nearby,

The house was filled with pain, chills, of endless night.

He flew there to see who is the hidden bait?

Who is that mystery singer that excite?

He saw there is a cage, caged in, Canary.

Sitting crying and waiting, try to recite.

The nightingale asked him why there is a cage.

What is wrong with the freedom that you ignite?

You should fly out of cage wonder like a fool.

Go under shades of wind, swim in the daylight.

Go and bathe in the dew while journey unfolds,

and taste sweet taste of love mixed with the twilight.

Break out of the cage, stretch your burnings wings.

In this realm of dreams, fly in highest height.

Canary said, my soul, is chained to this cage.

The cage is my prison, my world, and eyesight.

You see all the colors, chasing the rainbows.

My world is just the cage just black and just white.

I don't see what is there, further than this cage.

I just fly in within, finding my insight.

You need the sun and moon to see what is there.

My world can shine only, with just candlelight.

You mentioned, bathing in dew and drinking love,

I found all in within, no more appetite.

I heard the sun and moon are there to shine love,

I am exiled from those, dreaming to see light.

Go to "Haloo" and ask him how could it be?

he will tell you the story and say goodnight.

If you wanted to find a path to your soul,

send him a line, he will send you an invite.

Related Information

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