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Famous Woman Poems by Famous Poets

These are examples of famous Woman poems written by some of the greatest and most-well-known modern and classical poets. PoetrySoup is a great educational poetry resource of famous woman poems. These examples illustrate what a famous woman poem looks like and its form, scheme, or style (where appropriate).

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by Dickinson, Emily
...Heart—
Like her translated faces—
Teasing the want—
It—only—can suffice!

271

A solemn thing—it was—I said—
A woman—white—to be—
And wear—if God should count me fit—
Her blameless mystery—

A hallowed thing—to drop a life
Into the purple well—
Too plummetless—that it return—
Eternity—until—

I pondered how the bliss would look—
And would it feel as big—
When I could take it in my hand—
As hovering—seen—through fog—

And then—the size of this "small" li...Read More



by Sexton, Anne
...ss in God's eye. 
I dream I'm a boy with a zipper. 
It's so practical, la de dah. 
The trouble with being a woman, Skeezix, 
is being a little girl in the first place. 
Not all the books of the world will change that. 
I have swallowed an orange, being woman. 
You have swallowed a ruler, being man. 
Yet waiting to die we are the same thing. 
Jehovah pleasures himself with his axe 
before we are both overthrown. 
Skeezix, you are me. La ...Read More

by Byron, George (Lord)
...'d. 

VIII. 

'Twas strange — in youth all action and all life, 
Burning for pleasure, not averse from strife; 
Woman — the field — the ocean — all that gave 
Promise of gladness, peril of a grave, 
In turn he tried — he ransack'd all below, 
And found his recompence in joy or woe, 
No tame, trite medium; for his feelings sought 
In that intenseness an escape from thought: 
The tempest of his heart in scorn had gazed 
On that the feebler elements hath raised; 
The rap...Read More

by Frost, Robert
...t want you to. We don’t,
And you yourself don’t want to. Who else is there?”

“Save us from being cornered by a woman.
Well, there’s”—She told Fred afterward that in
The pause right there, she thought the dreaded word
Was coming, “God.” But no, he only said
“Well, there’s—the storm. That says I must go on.
That wants me as a war might if it came.
Ask any man.”

He threw her that as something
To last her till he got outside the door.
He had ...Read More

by Whitman, Walt
...old and new,
My dinner, dress, associates, looks, compliments, dues, 
The real or fancied indifference of some man or woman I love, 
The sickness of one of my folks, or of myself, or ill-doing, or loss or lack of
 money, or depressions or exaltations; 
Battles, the horrors of fratricidal war, the fever of doubtful news, the fitful
 events; 
These come to me days and nights, and go from me again,
But they are not the Me myself. 

Apart from the pulling and haulin...Read More



by Whitman, Walt
...ide? 
What with some fisherman, drawing his seine by the shore, as I walk by, and pause? 
What gives me to be free to a woman’s or man’s good-will? What gives them to be free to
 mine?

8
The efflux of the Soul is happiness—here is happiness; 
I think it pervades the open air, waiting at all times; 
Now it flows unto us—we are rightly charged. 

Here rises the fluid and attaching character; 
The fluid and attaching character is the freshness and sweetness of man and woman...Read More

by Chesterton, G K
...bellowing,
But the old ears of a careful king
Are glad of songs less rough."

Blue-eyed was Elf the minstrel,
With womanish hair and ring,
Yet heavy was his hand on sword,
Though light upon the string.

And as he stirred the strings of the harp
To notes but four or five,
The heart of each man moved in him
Like a babe buried alive.

And they felt the land of the folk-songs
Spread southward of the Dane,
And they heard the good Rhine flowing
In the heart of all Alle...Read More

by Wordsworth, William
...t  To poor old Simon Lee!  He has no son, he has no child,  His wife, an aged woman,  Lives with him, near the waterfall,  Upon the village common.   And he is lean and he is sick,  His dwindled body's half awry,  His ancles they are swoln and thick;  His legs are thin and dry.  When he was young he little knew  'Of h...Read More

by Tennyson, Alfred Lord
...e books of ours, but seem 
Mute of this miracle, far as I have read. 
But who first saw the holy thing today?' 

`A woman,' answered Percivale, `a nun, 
And one no further off in blood from me 
Than sister; and if ever holy maid 
With knees of adoration wore the stone, 
A holy maid; though never maiden glowed, 
But that was in her earlier maidenhood, 
With such a fervent flame of human love, 
Which being rudely blunted, glanced and shot 
Only to holy things; to prayer and...Read More

by Wordsworth, William
...e sits, as if in Susan's fate  Her life and soul were buried.   But Betty, poor good woman! she,  You plainly in her face may read it,  Could lend out of that moment's store  Five years of happiness or more,  To any that might need it.   But yet I guess that now and then  With Betty all was not so well,  And to the road she turns her ears...Read More

by Chaucer, Geoffrey
...e lady that I see
Yond in the garden roaming to and fro,
Is cause of all my crying and my woe.
I *n'ot wher* she be woman or goddess, *know not whether*
But Venus is it, soothly* as I guess, *truly
And therewithal on knees adown he fill,
And saide: "Venus, if it be your will
You in this garden thus to transfigure
Before me sorrowful wretched creature,
Out of this prison help that we may scape.
And if so be our destiny be shape
By etern word to dien in prison,
Of our l...Read More

by Scott, Sir Walter
...sly elf,
               'That is made with bloody hands.'

     But out then spoke she, Alice Brand,
          That woman void of fear,—
     'And if there 's blood upon his hand,
          'Tis but the blood of deer.'

     'Now loud thou liest, thou bold of mood!
          It cleaves unto his hand,
     The stain of thine own kindly blood,
          The blood of Ethert Brand.'

     Then forward stepped she, Alice Brand,
          And made the holy sign,—
   ...Read More

by Blake, William
...od.
The lust of the goat is the bounty of God.
The wrath of the lion is the wisdom of God.
The nakedness of woman is the work of God. 

Excess of sorrow laughs. Excess of joy weeps.

The roaring of lions, the howling of wolves, the raging of the
stormy sea, and the destructive sword. are portions of
eternity too great for the eye of man.

The fox condemns the trap, not himself.

Joys impregnate. Sorrows bring forth.

Let man wear th...Read More

by Bukowski, Charles
...she came back from the restroom and sat down next to me, I did feel some pride. She
was not only the most beautiful woman in town but also one of the most beautiful I had
ever seen. I placed my arm about her waist and kissed her once. 
"Do you think I'm pretty?" she asked. 
"Yes, of course, but there's something else... there's more than your
looks..." 
"People are always accusing me of being pretty. Do you really think I'm
pretty?"...Read More

by Carroll, Lewis
...wait no longer, John!
Tell them to set the dinner on!" 

The vision passed: the ghosts were fled:
He saw once more that woman dread:
He heard once more the words she said. 

He left her, and he turned aside:
He sat and watched the coming tide
Across the shores so newly dried. 

He wondered at the waters clear,
The breeze that whispered in his ear,
The billows heaving far and near, 

And why he had so long preferred
To hang upon her every word:
"In truth," he said, "it...Read More

by Byron, George (Lord)
...? 
In whom his qualities are reigning still, 
Except that household virtue, most uncommon, 
Of constancy to a bad, ugly woman. 

XIII 

'God save the king!' It is a large economy 
In God to save the like; but if he will 
Be saving, all the better; for not one am I 
Of those who think damnation better still: 
I hardly know too if not quite alone am I 
In this small hope of bettering future ill 
By circumscribing, with some slight restriction, 
The eternity of hell's hot ju...Read More

by Eliot, T S (Thomas Stearns)
...' und leer das Meer.
 Madame Sosostris, famous clairvoyante,
Had a bad cold, nevertheless
Is known to be the wisest woman in Europe,
With a wicked pack of cards. Here, said she,
Is your card, the drowned Phoenician Sailor,
(Those are pearls that were his eyes. Look!)
Here is Belladonna, the Lady of the Rocks,
The lady of situations. 
Here is the man with three staves, and here the Wheel,
And here is the one-eyed merchant, and this card,
Which is blank, is some...Read More

by Miller, Alice Duer
...he old, and cannot gain the new 
However loving and however true 
To their new duties. I could never be 
An English woman, there was that in me 
Puritan, stubborn that would not agree 
To English standards, though I did not see
The truth, because I thought them, good or ill,
So great a people—and I think so still.

But a day came when I was forced to face
Facts. I was taken down to see the place,
The family place in Devon— and John's mother.
'Of course, you un...Read More

by Plath, Sylvia
...corpses.

I shall move north. I shall move into a long blackness.
I see myself as a shadow, neither man nor woman,
Neither a woman, happy to be like a man, nor a man
Blunt and flat enough to feel no lack. I feel a lack.
I hold my fingers up, ten white pickets.
See, the darkness is leaking from the cracks.
I cannot contain it. I cannot contain my life.

I shall be a heroine of the peripheral.
I shall not be accused by isolate buttons,
Ho...Read More

by Akhmatova, Anna
...our white house -
Let life be empty and with light complete.
I'll sing the glory to you in my verse
Like not one woman has sung glory yet.
And that dear girlfriend you remember
In heaven you created for her sight,
I'm trading product that is very rare -
I sell your tenderness and loving light.



Song about Song

So many stones have been thrown at me
That I don't fear them any longer
Like elegant tower the westerner stands free
Among tall towers,...Read More

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