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Famous Showing Poems by Famous Poets

These are examples of famous Showing poems written by some of the greatest and most-well-known modern and classical poets. PoetrySoup is a great educational poetry resource of famous showing poems. These examples illustrate what a famous showing poem looks like and its form, scheme, or style (where appropriate).

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by Shakespeare, William
...and swoon at tragic shows.

'That not a heart which in his level came
Could 'scape the hail of his all-hurting aim,
Showing fair nature is both kind and tame;
And, veil'd in them, did win whom he would maim:
Against the thing he sought he would exclaim;
When he most burn'd in heart-wish'd luxury,
He preach'd pure maid, and praised cold chastity.

'Thus merely with the garment of a Grace
The naked and concealed fiend he cover'd;
That th' unexperient gave the tempter pl...Read More



by Frost, Robert
...aming was about to take.
Magnified apples appear and disappear,
Stem end and blossom end,
And every fleck of russet showing dear.
My instep arch not only keeps the ache,
It keeps the pressure of a ladder-round.
I feel the ladder sway as the boughs bend.
And I keep hearing from the cellar bin
The rumbling sound
Of load on load of apples coming in.
For I have had too much
Of apple-picking: I am overtired
Of the great harvest I myself desired.
There were ...Read More

by Whitman, Walt
...ailors heave at the capstan;
—Evening—me in my room—the setting sun, 
The setting summer sun shining in my open window, showing the swarm of flies, suspended,
 balancing
 in the air in the centre of the room, darting athwart, up and down, casting swift shadows
 in
 specks
 on the opposite wall, where the shine is; 
The athletic American matron speaking in public to crowds of listeners; 
Males, females, immigrants, combinations—the copiousness—the individuality of
 The
 States...Read More

by Moody, William Vaughn
...eathe our valiant sword 
Till we have changed our birthright for a gourd 
Of wild pulse stolen from a barbarian's hut; 
Showing how wise it is to cast away 
The symbols of our spiritual sway, 
That so our hands with better ease 
May wield the driver's whip and grasp the jailer's keys. 


VIII 

Was it for this our fathers kept the law? 
This crown shall crown their struggle and their ruth? 
Are we the eagle nation Milton saw 
Mewing its mighty youth, 
Soon to possess the ...Read More

by Sidney, Sir Philip
...Eight Song.


In a groue most rich of shade,
Where birds wanton musicke made,
Maie, then yong, his pide weedes showing,
New-perfum'd with flowers fresh growing:

Astrophel with Stella sweet
Did for mutual comfort meete,
Both within themselues oppressed,
But each in the other blessed.

Him great harmes had taught much care,
Her faire necke a foule yoke bare;
But her sight his cares did banish,
In his sight her yoke did vanish:

Wept they had, alas, th...Read More



by Browning, Robert
...e view of what joy is 
(Caught somewhat clearer by my eyes than thine) 
With feeling joy? confound the knowing how 
And showing how to live (my faculty) 
With actually living?--Otherwise 
Where is the artist's vantage o'er the king? 
Because in my great epos I display 
How divers men young, strong, fair, wise, can act-- 
Is this as though I acted? if I paint, 
Carve the young Ph{oe}bus, am I therefore young? 
Methinks I'm older that I bowed myself 
The many years of pain that...Read More

by Hugo, Victor
...st shown, 
 Its rows of battlements make triple crown; 
 At eve, its silhouette is finely traced 
 Immense and black—showing the Keep is placed 
 On rocky throne, sublime and high; east, west, 
 And north and south, at corners four, there rest 
 Four mounts; Aptar, where flourishes the pine, 
 And Toxis, where the elms grow green and fine; 
 Crobius and Bleyda, giants in their might, 
 Against the stormy winds to stand and fight, 
 And these above its diadem uphold ...Read More

by Montgomery, Lucy Maud
...dow,
Under a high-sprung sky, winnowed of mist and shadow. 

Sharp is the frosty air, and through the far hill-gaps showing
Lucent sunset lakes of crocus and green are glowing;
'Tis the hour to walk at will in a wayward, unfettered roaming,
Caring for naught save the charm, elusive and swift, of the gloaming. 

Watchful and stirless the fields as if not unkindly holding
Harvested joys in their clasp, and to their broad bosoms folding
Baby hopes of a Spring, trusted to...Read More

by Brautigan, Richard
....

 The surgeon took a knife from the sheath at his belt and

cut the throat of the chub with a very gentle motion, showing

poetically how sharp the knife was, and then he heaved the

fish back out into the lake.

 The chub made an awkward dead splash and obeyed allthe

traffic laws of this world SCHOOL ZONE SPEED 25 MILES

and sank to the cold bottom of the lake. It lay there white

belly up like a school bus covered with snow. A trout swam

over and took a ...Read More

by Ashbery, John
...action and to the end
Of our dreaming, as we had never imagined
It would end, in worn daylight with the painted
Promise showing through as a gage, a bond.
This nondescript, never-to-be defined daytime is
The secret of where it takes place
And we can no longer return to the various
Conflicting statements gathered, lapses of memory
Of the principal witnesses. All we know
Is that we are a little early, that
Today has that special, lapidary
Todayness that the sunlight rep...Read More

by Whitman, Walt
...ne lacks both, and the unseen is proved by the seen,
Till that becomes unseen, and receives proof in its turn. 

Showing the best, and dividing it from the worst, age vexes age; 
Knowing the perfect fitness and equanimity of things, while they discuss I am
 silent, and go bathe and admire myself. 

Welcome is every organ and attribute of me, and of any man hearty and clean; 
Not an inch, nor a particle of an inch, is vile, and none shall be less familiar
 tha...Read More

by Rich, Adrienne
...out our true identity? I could hazard
An answer now, if you are asking still.
We are a small and lonely human race
Showing no sign of mastering solitude
Out on this stony planet that we farm.
The most that we can do for one another
Is let our blunders and our blind mischances
Argue a certain brusque abrupt compassion.
We might as well be truthful. I should say
They're luckiest who know they're not unique;
But only art or common interchange
Can teach that kind...Read More

by Stevens, Wallace
...colonizer sharply stopped 
502 In the door-yard by his own capacious bloom. 
503 But that this bloom grown riper, showing nibs 
504 Of its eventual roundness, puerile tints 
505 Of spiced and weathery rouges, should complex 
506 The stopper to indulgent fatalist 
507 Was unforeseen. First Crispin smiled upon 
508 His goldenest demoiselle, inhabitant, 
509 She seemed, of a country of the capuchins, 
510 So delicately blushed, so humbly eyed, 
511 Attentive to...Read More

by Seeger, Alan
...m gold to pink as deepening sunset changes;

And over plain and far sierra spread
The fulgent rays of fading afternoon,
Showing each utmost peak and watershed
All clarified, each tassel and festoon
Of floating cloud embroidered overhead,
Like lotus-leaves on bluest waters strewn,
Flushing with rose, while all breathes fresh and free
In peace and amplitude and bland tranquillity.

Dear were such evenings to this gentle pair;
Love's tide that launched on with a blast too st...Read More

by Pushkin, Alexander
...my cot..."
Slowly, with a lazy gesture,
He lifts up the pane and - what?

Through the clouds, the moon was showing...
Well? the naked man was there,
Down his hair the water flowing,
Wide his eyes, unmoved the stare;
Numb the dreadful-looking body,
Arms were hanging feeble, thin;
Crabs and cancers, black and bloody,
Sucked into the swollen skin.

As the peasant slammed the shutter
(Recognized his visitant)
Horror-struck he could but mutter
"Blast y...Read More

by Masefield, John
...g full, 
Snorting and snoring like a bull, 
His bull cheeks puffed, his bull lips plowing, 
His ugly yellow front teeth showing. 
Just as we peeped we saw him fumble 
And scratch his head, and shift, and mumble. 
Down in the lane so thick and dark 
The tan-yards stank of bitter bark, 
The curate's pigeons gave a flutter, 
A cart went courting down the gutter, 
And none else stirred a foot or feather. 
The houses put their heads together, 
Talking, perhaps, so dark...Read More

by Browning, Robert
...ithout knowing it,
This Duke would fain know he was, without being it;
'Twas not for the joy's self, but the joy of his showing it,
Nor for the pride's self, but the pride of our seeing it,
He revived all usages thoroughly worn-out,
The souls of them fumed-forth, the hearts of them torn-out:
And chief in the chase his neck he perilled
On a lathy horse, all legs and length,
With blood for bone, all speed, no strength;
---They should have set him on red Berold
With the red eye ...Read More

by Scott, Sir Walter
...d the vision of the night.
     The hearth's decaying brands were red
     And deep and dusky lustre shed,
     Half showing, half concealing, all
     The uncouth trophies of the hall.
     Mid those the stranger fixed his eye
     Where that huge falchion hung on high,
     And thoughts on thoughts, a countless throng,
     Rushed, chasing countless thoughts along,
     Until, the giddy whirl to cure,
     He rose and sought the moonshine pure.
     XXXV.

    ...Read More

by Tennyson, Alfred Lord
...a grim dead tree before the tower, 
A goodly brother of the Table Round 
Swung by the neck: and on the boughs a shield 
Showing a shower of blood in a field noir, 
And therebeside a horn, inflamed the knights 
At that dishonour done the gilded spur, 
Till each would clash the shield, and blow the horn. 
But Arthur waved them back. Alone he rode. 
Then at the dry harsh roar of the great horn, 
That sent the face of all the marsh aloft 
An ever upward-rushing storm ...Read More

by Padel, Ruth
... (That's not how you come across 
To me.) Who couldn't give a toss for domestic peace - 
Only for celebrity and showing off - 
And won't hang round in a provincial zone 
Like this. We don't glitter. Though we do,
Warmly, truly, welcome you.
*
"Why did you come? I'd never have set eyes 
On a star like you, or blundered up against
This crazed not-sleeping, hour after hour
In the dark. I might have got the better of
My clumsy fury with constraint, my fret...Read More

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