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Walter Savage Landor Short Poems

Famous Short Walter Savage Landor Poems. Short poetry by famous poet Walter Savage Landor. A collection of the all-time best Walter Savage Landor short poems


by Walter Savage Landor
 I strove with none, for none was worth my strife:
Nature I loved, and, next to Nature, Art:
I warm'd both hands before the fire of Life;
It sinks; and I am ready to depart.



by Walter Savage Landor
 Mother, I cannot mind my wheel;
My fingers ache, my lips are dry:
Oh! if you felt the pain I feel!
But oh, who ever felt as I?

No longer could I doubt him true;
All other men may use deceit:
He always said my eyes were blue,
And often swore my lips were sweet.

by Walter Savage Landor
 THE leaves are falling; so am I; 
The few late flowers have moisture in the eye; 
 So have I too.
Scarcely on any bough is heard Joyous, or even unjoyous, bird The whole wood through.
Winter may come: he brings but nigher His circle (yearly narrowing) to the fire Where old friends meet.
Let him; now heaven is overcast, And spring and summer both are past, And all things sweet.

by Walter Savage Landor
 I strove with none, for none was worth my strife;
Nature I loved, and next to Nature, Art;
I warmed both hands before the fire of Life;
It sinks, and I am ready to depart.

by Walter Savage Landor
 ‘Do you remember me? or are you proud?’
Lightly advancing thro’ her star-trimm’d crowd,
Ianthe said, and look’d into my eyes.
‘A yes, a yes to both: for Memory Where you but once have been must ever be, And at your voice Pride from his throne must rise.

by Walter Savage Landor
 MOTHER, I cannot mind my wheel; 
 My fingers ache, my lips are dry: 
O, if you felt the pain I feel! 
 But O, who ever felt as I? 

No longer could I doubt him true-- 
 All other men may use deceit; 
He always said my eyes were blue, 
 And often swore my lips were sweet.

by Walter Savage Landor
 To my ninth decade I have tottered on, 
And no soft arm bends now my steps to steady; 
She, who once led me where she would, is gone, 
So when he calls me, Death shall find me ready.



by Walter Savage Landor
 I strove with none, for none was worth my strife.
Nature I loved and, next to Nature, Art: I warm'd both hands before the fire of life; It sinks, and I am ready to depart.

by Walter Savage Landor
 Here, ever since you went abroad,
If there be change, no change I see,
I only walk our wonted road,
The road is only walkt by me.
Yes; I forgot; a change there is; Was it of that you bade me tell? I catch at times, at times I miss The sight, the tone, I know so well.
Only two months since you stood here! Two shortest months! then tell me why Voices are harsher than they were, And tears are longer ere they dry.

by Walter Savage Landor
 Twenty years hence my eyes may grow
If not quite dim, yet rather so,
Still yours from others they shall know
Twenty years hence.
Twenty years hence though it may hap That I be called to take a nap In a cool cell where thunderclap Was never heard, There breathe but o'er my arch of grass A not too sadly sighed Alas, And I shall catch, ere you can pass, That winged word.

by Walter Savage Landor
 Death stands above me, whispering low 
I know not what into my ear:
Of his strange language all I know 
Is, there is not a word of fear.

by Walter Savage Landor
 Well I remember how you smiled
To see me write your name upon
The soft sea-sand .
.
.
"O! what a child! You think you're writing upon stone!" I have since written what no tide Shall ever wash away, what men Unborn shall read o'er ocean wide And find Ianthe's name again.

by Walter Savage Landor
 Lately our poets loiter'd in green lanes,
Content to catch the ballads of the plains;
I fancied I had strength enough to climb
A loftier station at no distant time,
And might securely from intrusion doze
Upon the flowers thro' which Ilissus flows.
In those pale olive grounds all voices cease, And from afar dust fills the paths of Greece.
My sluber broken and my doublet torn, I find the laurel also bears a thorn.

by Walter Savage Landor
 Very true, the linnets sing 
Sweetest in the leaves of spring: 
You have found in all these leaves 
That which changes and deceives, 
And, to pine by sun or star, 
Left them, false ones as they are.
But there be who walk beside Autumn's, till they all have died, And who lend a patient ear To low notes from branches sere.

by Walter Savage Landor
 THERE is a mountain and a wood between us, 
Where the lone shepherd and late bird have seen us 
 Morning and noon and eventide repass.
Between us now the mountain and the wood Seem standing darker than last year they stood, And say we must not cross--alas! alas!

by Walter Savage Landor
 Ah, what avails the sceptred race!
Ah, what the form divine!
What every virtue, every grace!
Rose Aylmer, all were thine.
Rose Aylmer, whom these wakeful eyes May weep, but never see, A night of memories and sighs I consecrate to thee.

by Walter Savage Landor
 WHY, why repine, my pensive friend, 
 At pleasures slipp'd away? 
Some the stern Fates will never lend, 
 And all refuse to stay.
I see the rainbow in the sky, The dew upon the grass; I see them, and I ask not why They glimmer or they pass.
With folded arms I linger not To call them back; 'twere vain: In this, or in some other spot, I know they'll shine again.

by Walter Savage Landor
 Soon, O Ianthe! life is o'er,
And sooner beauty's heavenly smile:
Grant only (and I ask no more),
Let love remain that little while.

by Walter Savage Landor
 One lovely name adorns my song, 
And, dwelling in the heart, 
Forever falters at the tongue, 
And trembles to depart.

by Walter Savage Landor
 Smiles soon abate; the boisterous throes 
Of anger long burst forth; 
Inconstantly the south-wind blows, 
But steadily the north.
Thy star, O Venus! often changes Its radiant seat above, The chilling pole-star never ranges -- 'Tis thus with Hate and Love.

Dirce  Create an image from this poem
by Walter Savage Landor
 Stand close around, ye Stygian set,
With Dirce in one boat conveyed,
Or Charon, seeing, may forget
That he is old and she a shade.

by Walter Savage Landor
 The chrysolites and rubies Bacchus brings 
To crown the feast where swells the broad-vein'd brow, 
Where maidens blush at what the minstrel sings, 
They who have coveted may covet now.
Bring me, in cool alcove, the grape uncrush'd, The peach of pulpy cheek and down mature, Where every voice (but bird's or child's) is hush'd, And every thought, like the brook nigh, runs pure.

by Walter Savage Landor
 You smiled, you spoke, and I believed,
By every word and smile deceived.
Another man would hope no more; Nor hope I what I hoped before: But let not this last wish be vain; Deceive, deceive me once again!

by Walter Savage Landor
 "Do you remember me? or are you proud?"
Lightly advancing thro' her star-trimm'd crowd,
Ianthe said, and lookt into my eyes,
"A yes, a yes, to both: for Memory
Where you but once have been must ever be,
And at your voice Pride from his throne must rise.
"

by Walter Savage Landor
 Proud word you never spoke, but you will speak
Four not exempt from pride some future day.
Resting on one white hand a warm wet cheek, Over my open volume you will say, 'This man loved me'—then rise and trip away.


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