Short Poetry by Popular Famous Poets

 Poet
1 William Wordsworth
2 Oscar Wilde
3 William Shakespeare
4 Emily Dickinson
5 Maya Angelou
6 Rabindranath Tagore
7 Robert Frost
8 Langston Hughes
9 Walt Whitman
10 Shel Silverstein
11 William Blake
12 Sylvia Plath
13 Pablo Neruda
14 Alfred Lord Tennyson
15 Rudyard Kipling
16 Edward Estlin (E E) Cummings
17 William Butler Yeats
18 Tupac Shakur
19 Sandra Cisneros
20 Alice Walker
21 Charles Bukowski
22 Henry Wadsworth Longfellow
23 Muhammad Ali
24 Sarojini Naidu
25 Christina Rossetti
26 Billy Collins
27 Carol Ann Duffy
28 Edgar Allan Poe
29 John Donne
30 John Keats
31 Nikki Giovanni
32 Ralph Waldo Emerson
33 Raymond Carver
34 Thomas Hardy
35 Ogden Nash
36 Lewis Carroll
37 Mark Twain
38 Spike Milligan
39 Anne Sexton
40 Carl Sandburg
41 Elizabeth Barrett Browning
42 Alexander Pushkin
43 Henry David Thoreau
44 Percy Bysshe Shelley
45 Victor Hugo
46 Roger McGough
47 George (Lord) Byron
48 Sara Teasdale
49 Gary Soto
50 Thunchaththu Ramanujan Ezhuthachan

Famous Short Silver Poems

Famous Short Silver Poems. Short Silver Poetry by Famous Poets. A collection of the all-time best Silver short poems

Other Short Poem Pages

Silver | Short Famous Poems and Poets

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by Emily Dickinson

As Everywhere of Silver

 As Everywhere of Silver
With Ropes of Sand
To keep it from effacing
The Track called Land.


by Emily Dickinson

The Robin for the Crumb

 The Robin for the Crumb
Returns no syllable
But long records the Lady's name
In Silver Chronicle.


by Shel Silverstein

Anteater

 "A genuine anteater,"
The pet man told me dad.
Turned out, it was an aunt eater, And now my uncle's mad!


by Emily Dickinson

How still the Bells in Steeples stand

 How still the Bells in Steeples stand
Till swollen with the Sky
They leap upon their silver Feet
In frantic Melody!


by Robert Herrick

HER BED

 See'st thou that cloud as silver clear,
Plump, soft, and swelling every where?
'Tis Julia's bed, and she sleeps there.


by Amy Levy

In September

 The sky is silver-grey; the long
Slow waves caress the shore.
-- On such a day as this I have been glad, Who shall be glad no more.


by Edward Lear

T was a thimble

T

was a thimble,
Of silver so bright!
When placed on the finger,
It fitted so tight!

t!

Nice little thimble!


by Edward Lear

U was a silver urn

U

was a silver urn,
Full of hot scalding water; Papa said, "If that Urn were mine,
I'd give it to my daughter!"


by Mother Goose

Mary, Mary, Quite Contrary

 

Mary, Mary, quite contrary,
  How does your garden grow?
Silver bells and cockle-shells,
  And pretty maids all of a row.


by Mother Goose

Cushy Cow


Cushy cow, bonny, let down thy milk,
And I will give thee a gown of silk;
A gown of silk and a silver tee,
If thou wilt let down thy milk to me.


by Edward Lear

There was a Young Lady of Bute

There was a Young Lady of Bute,
Who played on a silver-gilt flute;
She played several jigs to her Uncle's white Pigs:
That amusing Young Lady of Bute.


by Mother Goose

Bees


A swarm of bees in May
Is worth a load of hay;
A swarm of bees in June
Is worth a silver spoon;
A swarm of bees in July
Is not worth a fly.


by Wang Wei

A Song of an Autumn Night

 Under the crescent moon a light autumn dew 
Has chilled the robe she will not change -- 
And she touches a silver lute all night, 
Afraid to go back to her empty room.


by Omar Khayyam

When dawn doth silver the dark firmament,

When dawn doth silver the dark firmament,
Why shrills the bird of dawning his lament?
It is to show in dawn's bright looking-glass
How of thy careless life a night is spent.


by Omar Khayyam

O burden not thyself with drudgery,

O burden not thyself with drudgery,
Lord of white silver and red gold to be;
But feast with friends, ere this warm breath of thine
Be chilled in death, and earthworms feast on thee.


by Omar Khayyam

Keep from the trouble and vexation of aiming to acquire

Keep from the trouble and vexation of aiming to acquire
white silver or yellow gold. Eat with thy friend,
ere thy warm breath be cooled, for after thee come enemies
who will eat thee.


by Walter de la Mare

Why?

 Ever, ever
Stir and shiver
The reeds and rushes
By the river:
Ever, ever,
As if in dream,
The lone moon's silver
Sleeks the stream.
What old sorrow, What lost love, Moon, reeds, rushes, Dream you of?


by Shel Silverstein

The Toucan

 Tell me who can
Catch a toucan?
Lou can.
Just how few can Ride the toucan? Two can.
What kind of goo can Stick you to the toucan? Glue can.
Who can write some More about the toucan? You can!


by Emily Dickinson

Lightly stepped a yellow star

 Lightly stepped a yellow star
To its lofty place --
Loosed the Moon her silver hat
From her lustral Face --
All of Evening softly lit
As an Astral Hall --
Father, I observed to Heaven,
You are punctual.


by Mother Goose

Cock-A-Doodle-Do

 

Oh, my pretty cock, oh, my handsome cock,
  I pray you, do not crow before day,
And your comb shall be made of the very beaten gold,
  And your wings of the silver so gray.


by Emily Dickinson

A Planted Life -- diversified

 A Planted Life -- diversified
With Gold and Silver Pain
To prove the presence of the Ore
In Particles -- 'tis when

A Value struggle -- it exist --
A Power -- will proclaim
Although Annihilation pile
Whole Chaoses on Him --


by Walt Whitman

World Take Good Notice

 WORLD, take good notice, silver stars fading, 
Milky hue ript, weft of white detaching, 
Coals thirty-eight, baleful and burning, 
Scarlet, significant, hands off warning, 
Now and henceforth flaunt from these shores.
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by Emily Dickinson

Twice had Summer her fair Verdure

 Twice had Summer her fair Verdure
Proffered to the Plain --
Twice a Winter's silver Fracture
On the Rivers been --

Two full Autumns for the Squirrel
Bounteous prepared --
Nature, Had'st thou not a Berry
For thy wandering Bird?


by Robert Burns

420. Lines of John M'Murdo Esq

 BLEST be M’Murdo to his latest day!
No envious cloud o’ercast his evening ray;
No wrinkle, furrow’d by the hand of care,
Nor ever sorrow add one silver hair!
O may no son the father’s honour stain,
Nor ever daughter give the mother pain!


by Emily Dickinson

It dropped so low -- in my Regard --

 It dropped so low -- in my Regard --
I heard it hit the Ground --
And go to pieces on the Stones
At bottom of my Mind --

Yet blamed the Fate that flung it -- less
Than I denounced Myself,
For entertaining Plated Wares
Upon my Silver Shelf --


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