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Ralph Waldo Emerson Short Poems

Famous Short Ralph Waldo Emerson Poems. Short poetry by famous poet Ralph Waldo Emerson. A collection of the all-time best Ralph Waldo Emerson short poems


by Ralph Waldo Emerson
THOUGH love repine and reason chafe  
There came a voice without reply ¡ª 
'T is man's perdition to be safe, 
When for the truth he ought to die.



Days  Create an image from this poem
by Ralph Waldo Emerson
DAUGHTERS of Time the hypocritic Days  
Muffled and dumb like barefoot dervishes  
And marching single in an endless file  
Bring diadems and fagots in their hands.
To each they offer gifts after his will 5 Bread kingdoms stars and sky that holds them all.
I in my pleach¨¨d garden watched the pomp Forgot my morning wishes hastily Took a few herbs and apples and the Day Turned and departed silent.
I too late 10 Under her solemn fillet saw the scorn.

by Ralph Waldo Emerson
 Virtue runs before the muse
And defies her skill,
She is rapt, and doth refuse
To wait a painter's will.
Star-adoring, occupied, Virtue cannot bend her, Just to please a poet's pride, To parade her splendor.
The bard must be with good intent No more his, but hers, Throw away his pen and paint, Kneel with worshippers.
Then, perchance, a sunny ray From the heaven of fire, His lost tools may over-pay, And better his desire.

Poet  Create an image from this poem
by Ralph Waldo Emerson
TO clothe the fiery thought 
In simple words succeeds  
For still the craft of genius is 
To mask a king in weeds.

by Ralph Waldo Emerson
From the French


SOME of the hurts you have cured  
And the sharpest you still have survived  
But what torments of grief you endured 
From evils which never arrived! 



Eros  Create an image from this poem
by Ralph Waldo Emerson
 The sense of the world is short,
Long and various the report,—
To love and be beloved;
Men and gods have not outlearned it,
And how oft soe'er they've turned it,
'Tis not to be improved.

by Ralph Waldo Emerson
 Hast thou named all the birds without a gun;
Loved the wood-rose, and left it on its stalk;
At rich men's tables eaten bread and pulse;
Unarmed, faced danger with a heart of trust;
And loved so well a high behavior
In man or maid, that thou from speech refrained,
Nobility more nobly to repay?—
O be my friend, and teach me to be thine!

by Ralph Waldo Emerson
 The sinful painter drapes his goddess warm,
Because she still is naked, being drest;
The godlike sculptor will not so deform
Beauty, which bones and flesh enough invest.

Merops  Create an image from this poem
by Ralph Waldo Emerson
 What care I, so they stand the same,—
Things of the heavenly mind,—
How long the power to give them fame
Tarries yet behind?

Thus far to-day your favors reach,
O fair, appeasing Presences!
Ye taught my lips a single speech,
And a thousand silences.
Space grants beyond his fated road No inch to the god of day, And copious language still bestowed One word, no more, to say.

by Ralph Waldo Emerson
I SEE all human wits 
Are measured but a few; 
Unmeasured still my Shakespeare sits  
Lone as the blessed Jew.

To Eva  Create an image from this poem
by Ralph Waldo Emerson
O FAIR and stately maid whose eyes 
Were kindled in the upper skies 
At the same torch that lighted mine; 
For so I must interpret still 
Thy sweet dominion o'er my will 5 
A sympathy divine.
Ah! let me blameless gaze upon Features that seem at heart my own; Nor fear those watchful sentinels Who charm the more their glance forbids 10 Chaste-glowing underneath their lids With fire that draws while it repels.

Dirge  Create an image from this poem
by Ralph Waldo Emerson
 Boys and girls that held her dear,
Do your weeping now;
All you loved of her lies here.
Brought to earth the arrogant brow, And the withering tongue Chastened; do your weeping now.
Sing whatever songs are sung, Wind whatever wreath, For a playmate perished young, For a spirit spent in death.
Boys and girls that held her dear, All you loved of her lies here.

by Ralph Waldo Emerson
 Why should I keep holiday,
When other men have none?
Why but because when these are gay,
I sit and mourn alone.
And why when mirth unseals all tongues Should mine alone be dumb? Ah! late I spoke to silent throngs, And now their hour is come.

by Ralph Waldo Emerson
 The rain has spoiled the farmer's day;
Shall sorrow put my books away?
Thereby are two days lost:
Nature shall mind her own affairs,
I will attend my proper cares,
In rain, or sun, or frost.

by Ralph Waldo Emerson
 "May be true what I had heard,
Earth's a howling wilderness
Truculent with fraud and force,"
Said I, strolling through the pastures,
And along the riverside.
Caught among the blackberry vines, Feeding on the Ethiops sweet, Pleasant fancies overtook me: I said, "What influence me preferred Elect to dreams thus beautiful?" The vines replied, "And didst thou deem No wisdom to our berries went?"

by Ralph Waldo Emerson
 Your picture smiles as first it smiled,
The ring you gave is still the same,
Your letter tells, O changing child,
No tidings since it came.
Give me an amulet That keeps intelligence with you, Red when you love, and rosier red, And when you love not, pale and blue.
Alas, that neither bonds nor vows Can certify possession; Torments me still the fear that love Died in its last expression.

by Ralph Waldo Emerson
SHINES the last age the next with hope is seen  
To-day slinks poorly off unmarked between: 
Future or Past no richer secret folds  
O friendless Present! than thy bosom holds.

by Ralph Waldo Emerson
 Seek not the Spirit, if it hide,
Inexorable to thy zeal:
Baby, do not whine and chide;
Art thou not also real?
Why should'st thou stoop to poor excuse?
Turn on the Accuser roundly; say,
"Here am I, here will I remain
Forever to myself soothfast,
Go thou, sweet Heaven, or, at thy pleasure stay.
"— Already Heaven with thee its lot has cast, For it only can absolutely deal.