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Henry Van Dyke Short Poems

Famous Short Henry Van Dyke Poems. Short poetry by famous poet Henry Van Dyke. A collection of the all-time best Henry Van Dyke short poems


by Henry Van Dyke
 A flawless cup: how delicate and fine
The flowing curve of every jewelled line!
Look, turn it up or down, 't is perfect still,--
But holds no drop of life's heart-warming wine.



by Henry Van Dyke
 Hours fly,
Flowers die:
New days,
New ways:
Pass by!
Love stays.

by Henry Van Dyke
 Through many a land your journey ran,
And showed the best the world can boast:
Now tell me, traveller, if you can,
The place that pleased you most.
" She laid her hands upon my breast, And murmured gently in my ear, "The place I loved and liked the best Was in your arms, my dear!"

by Henry Van Dyke
 I read within a poet's book 
A word that starred the page:
"Stone walls do not a prison make, 
Nor iron bars a cage!" 

Yes, that is true; and something more
You'll find, where'er you roam,
That marble floors and gilded walls
Can never make a home.
But every house where Love abides, And Friendship is a guest, Is surely home, and home-sweet-home: For there the heart can rest.

Hesper  Create an image from this poem
by Henry Van Dyke
 Her eyes are like the evening air,
Her voice is like a rose,
Her lips are like a lovely song,
That ripples as it flows,
And she herself is sweeter than
The sweetest thing she knows.
A slender, haunting, twilight form Of wonder and surprise, She seemed a fairy or a child, Till, deep within her eyes, I saw the homeward-leading star Of womanhood arise.

by Henry Van Dyke
 Peace without Justice is a low estate,--
A coward cringing to an iron Fate!
But Peace through Justice is the great ideal,--
We'll pay the price of war to make it real.

by Henry Van Dyke
 Four things a man must learn to do 
If he would make his record true: 
To think without confusion clearly; 
To love his fellow man sincerely; 
To act from honest motives purely; 
To trust in God and Heaven securely.



by Henry Van Dyke
 If all the skies were sunshine,
Our faces would be fain
To feel once more upon them
The cooling splash of rain.
If all the world were music, Our hearts would often long For one sweet strain of silence, To break the endless song.
If life were always merry, Our souls would seek relief, And rest from weary laughter In the quiet arms of grief.

by Henry Van Dyke
 Oh, quick to feel the lightest touch 
Of beauty or of truth,
Rich in the thoughtfulness of age,
The hopefulness of youth,
The courage of the gentle heart,
The wisdom of the pure,
The strength of finely tempered souls
To labour and endure! 

The blue of springtime in your eyes
Was never quenched by pain;
And winter brought your head the crown
Of snow without a stain.
The poet's mind, the prince's heart, You kept until the end, Nor ever faltered in your work, Nor ever failed a friend.

by Henry Van Dyke
 I love thine inland seas, 
Thy groves of giant trees,
Thy rolling plains;
Thy rivers' mighty sweep, 
Thy mystic canyons deep, 
Thy mountains wild and steep,
All thy domains; 

Thy silver Eastern strands, 
Thy Golden Gate that stands
Wide to the West;
Thy flowery Southland fair, 
Thy sweet and crystal air, --
O land beyond compare,
Thee I love best! 

Additional verses for the 
National Hymn, 
March, 1906.

by Henry Van Dyke
 The shadow by my finger cast
Divides the future from the past:
Before it, sleeps the unborn hour
In darkness, and beyond thy power:
Behind its unreturning line,
The vanished hour, no longer thine:
One hour alone is in thy hands,--
The NOW on which the shadow stands.

by Henry Van Dyke
 Limber-limbed, lazy god, stretched on the rock,
Where is sweet Echo, and where is your flock? 
What are you making here? "Listen," said Pan, --
"Out of a river-reed music for man!"

by Henry Van Dyke
 Time is 
Too Slow for those who Wait,
Too Swift for those who Fear,
Too Long for those who Grieve,
Too Short for those who Rejoice;
But for those who Love,
Time is not.

by Henry Van Dyke
 "Christ of the Andes," Christ of Everywhere, 
Great lover of the hills, the open air, 
And patient lover of impatient men 
Who blindly strive and sin and strive again, -- 
Thou Living Word, larger than any creed, 
Thou Love Divine, uttered in human deed, -- 
Oh, teach the world, warring and wandering still, 
Thy way of Peace, the foot path of Good Will!

by Henry Van Dyke
 "The worlds in which we live are two
The world 'I am' and the world 'I do.
'" The worlds in which we live at heart are one, The world "I am," the fruit of "I have done"; And underneath these worlds of flower and fruit, The world "I love,"--the only living root.

by Henry Van Dyke
 This is the soldier brave enough to tell 
The glory-dazzled world that `war is hell': 
Lover of peace, he looks beyond the strife, 
And rides through hell to save his country's life.

Undine  Create an image from this poem
by Henry Van Dyke
 'T was far away and long ago,
When I was but a dreaming boy,
This fairy tale of love and woe
Entranced my heart with tearful joy;
And while with white Undine I wept,
Your spirit, -- ah, how strange it seems, --
Was cradled in some star, and slept,
Unconscious of her coming dreams.

by Henry Van Dyke
 Long had I loved this "Attic shape," the brede 
Of marble maidens round this urn divine:
But when your golden voice began to read,
The empty urn was filled with Chian wine.

by Henry Van Dyke
 If Might made Right, life were a wild-beasts' cage;
If Right made Might, this were the golden age;
But now, until we win the long campaign, 
Right must gain Might to conquer and to reign.

by Henry Van Dyke
 In mirth he mocks the other birds at noon,
Catching the lilt of every easy tune;
But when the day departs he sings of love,--
His own wild song beneath the listening moon.