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Friedrich Von Schiller Short Poems

Famous Short Friedrich Von Schiller Poems. Short poetry by famous poet Friedrich Von Schiller. A collection of the all-time best Friedrich Von Schiller short poems


by Friedrich von Schiller
 Thou in truth shouldst be one, yet not with the whole shouldst thou be so.
'Tis through the reason thou'rt one,--art so with it through the heart.
Voice of the whole is thy reason, but thou thine own heart must be ever; If in thy heart reason dwells evermore, happy art thou.



by Friedrich von Schiller
 All that thou doest is right; but, friend, don't carry this precept
On too far,--be content, all that is right to effect.
It is enough to true zeal, if what is existing be perfect; False zeal always would find finished perfection at once.

by Friedrich von Schiller
 Seeking to find his home, Odysseus crosses each water;
Through Charybdis so dread; ay, and through Scylla's wild yells,
Through the alarms of the raging sea, the alarms of the land too,--
E'en to the kingdom of hell leads him his wandering course.
And at length, as he sleeps, to Ithaca's coast fate conducts him; There he awakes, and, with grief, knows not his fatherland now.

by Friedrich von Schiller
 Man frames his judgment on reason; but woman on love founds her verdict;
If her judgment loves not, woman already has judged.

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by Friedrich von Schiller
 We speak with the lip, and we dream in the soul,
Of some better and fairer day;
And our days, the meanwhile, to that golden goal
Are gliding and sliding away.
Now the world becomes old, now again it is young, But "The better" 's forever the word on the tongue.
At the threshold of life hope leads us in-- Hope plays round the mirthful boy; Though the best of its charms may with youth begin, Yet for age it reserves its toy.

by Friedrich von Schiller
 Which religion do I acknowledge? None that thou namest.
"None that I name? And why so?"--Why, for religion's own sake?

by Friedrich von Schiller
 Deeper and bolder truths be careful, my friends, of avowing;
For as soon as ye do all the world on ye will fall.



by Friedrich von Schiller
 Oh thou degenerate child of the great and glorious mother,
Who with the Romans' strong might couplest the Tyrians' deceit!
But those ever governed with vigor the earth they had conquered,--
These instructed the world that they with cunning had won.
Say! what renown does history grant thee? Thou, Roman-like, gained'st That with the steel, which with gold, Tyrian-like, then thou didst rule!

by Friedrich von Schiller
 Steer on, bold sailor--Wit may mock thy soul that sees the land,
And hopeless at the helm may droop the weak and weary hand,
Yet ever--ever to the West, for there the coast must lie,
And dim it dawns, and glimmering dawns before thy reason's eye;
Yea, trust the guiding God--and go along the floating grave,
Though hid till now--yet now behold the New World o'er the wave!
With genius Nature ever stands in solemn union still,
And ever what the one foretells the other shall fulfil.

by Friedrich von Schiller
 Nowhere in the organic or sensitive world ever kindles
Novelty, save in the flower, noblest creation of life.

by Friedrich von Schiller
 Was it always as now? This race I truly can't fathom.
Nothing is young but old age; youth, alas! only is old.

by Friedrich von Schiller
 Lovely he looks, 'tis true, with the light of his torch now extinguished;
But remember that death is not aesthetic, my friends!

by Friedrich von Schiller
 All, thou gentle one, lies embraced in thy kingdom; the graybeard
Back to the days of his youth, childish and child-like, returns.

by Friedrich von Schiller
 Rightly said, Schlosser! Man loves what he has; what he has not, desireth;
None but the wealthy minds love; poor minds desire alone.

by Friedrich von Schiller
 Thou hast produced mighty monarchs, of whom thou art not unworthy,
For the obedient alone make him who governs them great.
But, O Germany, try if thou for thy rulers canst make it Harder as kings to be great,--easier, though, to be men!

by Friedrich von Schiller
 Dearly I love a friend; yet a foe I may turn to my profit;
Friends show me that which I can; foes teach me that which I should.

by Friedrich von Schiller
 Scarce has the fever so chilly of Gallomania departed,
When a more burning attack in Grecomania breaks out.
Greekism,--what did it mean?--'Twas harmony, reason, and clearness! Patience,--good gentlemen, pray, ere ye of Greekism speak! 'Tis for an excellent cause ye are fighting, and all that I ask for Is that with reason it ne'er may be a laughing-stock made.

by Friedrich von Schiller
 Even the moral world its nobility boasts--vulgar natures
Reckon by that which they do; noble, by that which they are.

by Friedrich von Schiller
 I have a heartfelt aversion for crime,--a twofold aversion,
Since 'tis the reason why man prates about virtue so much.
"What! thou hatest, then, virtue?"--I would that by all it were practised, So that, God willing, no man ever need speak of it more.

by Friedrich von Schiller
 Millions busily toil, that the human race may continue;
But by only a few is propagated our kind.
Thousands of seeds by the autumn are scattered, yet fruit is engendered Only by few, for the most back to the element go.
But if one only can blossom, that one is able to scatter Even a bright living world, filled with creations eterne.

by Friedrich von Schiller
 God alone sees the heart and therefore, since he alone sees it,
Be it our care that we, too, something that's worthy may see.

by Friedrich von Schiller
 How does the genius make itself known? In the way that in nature
Shows the Creator himself,--e'en in the infinite whole.
Clear is the ether, and yet of depth that ne'er can be fathomed; Seen by the eye, it remains evermore closed to the sense.

by Friedrich von Schiller
 Let none resemble another; let each resemble the highest!
How can that happen? let each be all complete in itself.

by Friedrich von Schiller
 Oh, how infinite, how unspeakably great, are the heavens!
Yet by frivolity's hand downwards the heavens are pulled!

by Friedrich von Schiller
 E'en by the hand of the wicked can truth be working with vigor;
But the vessel is filled by what is beauteous alone.