Short Poetry by Popular Famous Poets

 Poet
1 William Wordsworth
2 Oscar Wilde
3 William Shakespeare
4 Emily Dickinson
5 Maya Angelou
6 Rabindranath Tagore
7 Robert Frost
8 Langston Hughes
9 Walt Whitman
10 Shel Silverstein
11 William Blake
12 Sylvia Plath
13 Pablo Neruda
14 Alfred Lord Tennyson
15 William Butler Yeats
16 Rudyard Kipling
17 Tupac Shakur
18 Edward Estlin (E E) Cummings
19 Charles Bukowski
20 Sandra Cisneros
21 Alice Walker
22 Muhammad Ali
23 Henry Wadsworth Longfellow
24 Billy Collins
25 Sarojini Naidu
26 Christina Rossetti
27 Carol Ann Duffy
28 Edgar Allan Poe
29 John Donne
30 Nikki Giovanni
31 Ralph Waldo Emerson
32 John Keats
33 Raymond Carver
34 Ogden Nash
35 Lewis Carroll
36 Thomas Hardy
37 Mark Twain
38 Spike Milligan
39 Anne Sexton
40 Carl Sandburg
41 Alexander Pushkin
42 Elizabeth Barrett Browning
43 Percy Bysshe Shelley
44 Henry David Thoreau
45 Victor Hugo
46 Roger McGough
47 Sara Teasdale
48 George (Lord) Byron
49 Gary Soto
50 Thunchaththu Ramanujan Ezhuthachan

Poetry Forum Areas

Introduce Yourself

New to PoetrySoup? Introduce yourself here. Tell us something about yourself.

Looking for a Poem

Can't find a poem you've read before? Looking for a poem for a special person or an occasion? Ask other member for help.

Writing Poetry

Ways to improve your poetry. Post your techniques, tips, and creative ideas how to write better.

High Critique

For poets who want unrestricted constructive criticism. This is NOT a vanity workshop. If you do not want your poem seriously critiqued, do not post here. Constructive criticism only. PLEASE Only Post One Poem a Day!!!

How do I...?

Ask PoetrySoup Members how to do something or find something on PoetrySoup.



You have an ad blocker! We understand, but...

PoetrySoup is a very small privately owned website. Our primary means of support comes from revenue generated by advertising.
We want to keep PoetrySoup alive, make it better, and keep PoetrySoup free. Please support us by disabling your ad blocker for PoetrySoup only, while keeping your ad blocker active. How to do it. Thank you!

Famous Short Faith Poems

Famous Short Faith Poems. Short Faith Poetry by Famous Poets. A collection of the all-time best Faith short poems

Other Short Poem Pages


Poems are below...


Faith | Short Famous Poems and Poets

 
by Muhammad Ali

He took a few cups of love

He took a few cups of love.
He took one tablespoon of patience,
One teaspoon of generosity,
One pint of kindness.
He took one quart of laughter,
One pinch of concern.
And then, he mixed willingness with happiness.
He added lots of faith,
And he stirred it up well.
Then he spread it over a span of a lifetime,
And he served it to each and every deserving person he met.


by Wendell Berry

What We Need Is Here

 Geese appear high over us,
pass, and the sky closes.
Abandon, as in love or sleep, holds them to their way, clear in the ancient faith: what we need is here.
And we pray, not for new earth or heaven, but to be quiet in heart, and in eye, clear.
What we need is here.


by Emily Dickinson

Through the Dark Sod -- as Education

 Through the Dark Sod -- as Education --
The Lily passes sure --
Feels her white foot -- no trepidation --
Her faith -- no fear --

Afterward -- in the Meadow --
Swinging her Beryl Bell --
The Mold-life -- all forgotten -- now --
In Ecstasy -- and Dell --


by Emily Dickinson

He strained my faith

 He strained my faith --
Did he find it supple?
Shook my strong trust --
Did it then -- yield?

Hurled my belief --
But -- did he shatter -- it?
Racked -- with suspense --
Not a nerve failed!

Wrung me -- with Anguish --
But I never doubted him --
'Tho' for what wrong
He did never say --

Stabbed -- while I sued
His sweet forgiveness --
Jesus -- it's your little "John"!
Don't you know -- me?


by William Shakespeare

Sonnet CXLI

 In faith, I do not love thee with mine eyes,
For they in thee a thousand errors note;
But 'tis my heart that loves what they despise,
Who in despite of view is pleased to dote;


by Emily Dickinson

A first Mute Coming --

 A first Mute Coming --
In the Stranger's House --
A first fair Going --
When the Bells rejoice --

A first Exchange -- of
What hath mingled -- been --
For Lot -- exhibited to
Faith -- alone --


by Sara Teasdale

Doubt

 My soul lives in my body's house,
 And you have both the house and her—
But sometimes she is less your own
 Than a wild, gay adventurer;
A restless and an eager wraith,
 How can I tell what she will do—
Oh, I am sure of my body's faith,
 But what if my soul broke faith with you?


by Emily Dickinson

Peace is a fiction of our Faith --

 Peace is a fiction of our Faith --
The Bells a Winter Night
Bearing the Neighbor out of Sound
That never did alight.


by Friedrich von Schiller

My Faith

 Which religion do I acknowledge? None that thou namest.
"None that I name? And why so?"--Why, for religion's own sake?


by Dejan Stojanovic

Faith

Dust to dust, 
Ashes to ashes.
Is that all?


by T S (Thomas Stearns) Eliot

Cousin Nancy

 MISS NANCY ELLICOTT
Strode across the hills and broke them,
Rode across the hills and broke them—
The barren New England hills—
Riding to hounds
Over the cow-pasture.
Miss Nancy Ellicott smoked And danced all the modern dances; And her aunts were not quite sure how they felt about it, But they knew that it was modern.
Upon the glazen shelves kept watch Matthew and Waldo, guardians of the faith, The army of unalterable law.


by Omar Khayyam

From doubt to clear assurance is a breath,

From doubt to clear assurance is a breath,
A breath from infidelity to faith;
O precious breath! enjoy it while you may,
'Tis all that life can give, and then comes death.


by Robert Hayden

Monets Waterlilies

 Today as the news from Selma and Saigon
poisons the air like fallout,
I come again to see
the serene, great picture that I love.
Here space and time exist in light the eye like the eye of faith believes.
The seen, the known dissolve in iridescence, become illusive flesh of light that was not, was, forever is.
O light beheld as through refracting tears.
Here is the aura of that world each of us has lost.
Here is the shadow of its joy.


by Emily Dickinson

Faith is a fine invention

 "Faith" is a fine invention
When Gentlemen can see --
But Microscopes are prudent
In an Emergency.


by George Herbert

H. Baptism II

 Since, Lord, to thee
A narrow way and little gate
Is all the passage, on my infancy
Thou didst lay hold, and antedate
My faith in me.
O let me still Write thee great God, and me a child: Let me be soft and supple to thy will, Small to my self, to others mild, Behither ill.
Although by stealth My flesh get on, yet let her sister My soul bid nothing, but preserve her wealth: The growth of flesh is but a blister; Childhood is health.


by Robert Frost

The Peaceful Shepherd

 If heaven were to do again,
And on the pasture bars,
I leaned to line the figures in
Between the dotted starts,

I should be tempted to forget,
I fear, the Crown of Rule,
The Scales of Trade, the Cross of Faith,
As hardly worth renewal.
For these have governed in our lives, And see how men have warred.
The Cross, the Crown, the Scales may all As well have been the Sword.


by Emily Dickinson

Morning -- means Milking -- to the Farmer

 "Morning" -- means "Milking" -- to the Farmer --
Dawn -- to the Teneriffe --
Dice -- to the Maid --
Morning means just Risk -- to the Lover --
Just revelation -- to the Beloved --

Epicures -- date a Breakfast -- by it --
Brides -- an Apocalypse --
Worlds -- a Flood --
Faint-going Lives -- Their Lapse from Sighing --
Faith -- The Experiment of Our Lord


by Emily Dickinson

Unfulfilled to Observation --

 Unfulfilled to Observation --
Incomplete -- to Eye --
But to Faith -- a Revolution
In Locality --

Unto Us -- the Suns extinguish --
To our Opposite --
New Horizons -- they embellish --
Fronting Us -- with Night.


by John Greenleaf Whittier

By Their Works

 Call him not heretic whose works attest
His faith in goodness by no creed confessed.
Whatever in love's name is truly done To free the bound and lift the fallen one Is done to Christ.
Whoso in deed and word Is not against Him labours for our Lord.
When he, who, sad and weary, longing sore For love's sweet service sought the sisters' door One saw the heavenly, one the human guest But who shall say which loved the master best?


by Mary Elizabeth Coleridge

Blue and White

 BLUE is Our Lady’s colour, 
White is Our Lord’s.
To-morrow I will wear a knot Of blue and white cords, That you may see it, where you ride Among the flashing swords.
O banner, white and sunny blue, With prayer I wove thee! For love the white, for faith the heavenly hue, And both for him, so tender-true, Him that doth love me!


by Robert Burns

107. Versified Reply to an Invitation

 SIR,Yours this moment I unseal,
 And faith I’m gay and hearty!
To tell the truth and shame the deil,
 I am as fou as Bartie:
But Foorsday, sir, my promise leal,
 Expect me o’ your partie,
If on a beastie I can speel,
 Or hurl in a cartie.
YOURS,ROBERT BURNS.
MAUCHLIN, Monday night, 10 o’clock.


by Robert Creeley

The Mirror

 Seeing is believing.
Whatever was thought or said, these persistent, inexorable deaths make faith as such absent, our humanness a question, a disgust for what we are.
Whatever the hope, here it is lost.
Because we coveted our difference, here is the cost.


by Emily Dickinson

Read -- Sweet -- how others -- strove

 Read -- Sweet -- how others -- strove --
Till we -- are stouter --
What they -- renounced --
Till we -- are less afraid --
How many times they -- bore the faithful witness --
Till we -- are helped --
As if a Kingdom -- cared!

Read then -- of faith --
That shone above the fagot --
Clear strains of Hymn
The River could not drown --
Brave names of Men --
And Celestial Women --
Passed out -- of Record
Into -- Renown!


by Vachel Lindsay

Look You Ill Go Pray

 Look you, I'll go pray, 
My shame is crying, 
My soul is gray and faint, 
My faith is dying.
Look you, I'll go pray — "Sweet Mary, make me clean, Thou rainstorm of the soul, Thou wine from worlds unseen.
"


by Edwin Arlington Robinson

Exit

 For what we owe to other days, 
Before we poisoned him with praise, 
May we who shrank to find him weak 
Remember that he cannot speak.
For envy that we may recall, And for our faith before the fall, May we who are alive be slow To tell what we shall never know.
For penance he would not confess, And for the fateful emptiness Of early triumph undermined, May we now venture to be kind.