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Famous Farm Poems by Famous Poets

These are examples of famous Farm poems written by some of the greatest and most-well-known modern and classical poets. PoetrySoup is a great educational poetry resource of famous farm poems. These examples illustrate what a famous farm poem looks like and its form, scheme, or style (where appropriate).

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by Wilde, Oscar
...and then half afraid
Passed on his simple way, or down the still and silent glade

A little girl ran laughing from the farm,
Not thinking of love's secret mysteries,
And when she saw the white and gleaming arm
And all his manlihood, with longing eyes
Whose passion mocked her sweet virginity
Watched him awhile, and then stole back sadly and wearily.

Far off he heard the city's hum and noise,
And now and then the shriller laughter where
The passionate purity of brown-limb...Read More



by Longfellow, Henry Wadsworth
...he roe, when he hears in the woodland the voice of the huntsman
Where is the thatch-roofed village, the home of Acadian farmers,--
Men whose lives glided on like rivers that water the woodlands,
Darkened by shadows of earth, but reflecting an image of heaven?
Waste are those pleasant farms, and the farmers forever departed!
Scattered like dust and leaves, when the mighty blasts of October
Seize them, and whirl them aloft, and sprinkle them far o'er the ocean
Naught but tradit...Read More

by Larkin, Philip
...endid family

I never ran to when I got depressed,
The boys all biceps and the girls all chest,
Their comic Ford, their farm where I could be
'Really myself'. I'll show you, come to that,
The bracken where I never trembling sat,

Determined to go through with it; where she
Lay back, and 'all became a burning mist'.
And, in those offices, my doggerel
Was not set up in blunt ten-point, nor read
By a distinguished cousin of the mayor,

Who didn't call and tell my father ...Read More

by Frost, Robert
...country, settled down,
When people ’re getting on in life, You’ll like it.”
Joe said: “You big boys ought to find a farm,
And make good farmers, and leave other fellows
The city work to do. There’s not enough
For everybody as it is in there.”
“God!” one said wildly, and, when no one spoke:
“Say that to Jimmy here. He needs a farm.”
But Jimmy only made his jaw recede
Fool-like, and rolled his eyes as if to say
He saw himself a farmer. Then there was a F...Read More

by Marvell, Andrew
...l wart, 
Horse-leeches circling at the hem'rrhoid vein: 
He sucks the King, they him, he them again. 
The kingdom's farm he lets to them bid least 
(Greater the bribe, and that's at interest). 
Here men, induced by safety, gain, and ease, 
Their money lodge; confiscate when he please. 
These can at need, at instant, with a scrip 
(This liked him best) his cash beyond sea whip. 
When Dutch invade, when Parliament prepare, 
How can he engines so convenient spare...Read More



by Emerson, Ralph Waldo
...o son succeed!

Soft! let not the offended muse
Toil's hard hap with scorn accuse.
Many hamlets sought I then,
Many farms of mountain men;—
Found I not a minstrel seed,
But men of bone, and good at need.
Rallying round a parish steeple
Nestle warm the highland people,
Coarse and boisterous, yet mild,
Strong as giant, slow as child,
Smoking in a squalid room,
Where yet the westland breezes come.
Close hid in those rough guises lurk
Western magians, here they work;
...Read More

by Frost, Robert
...ce was muffled to the eyes,
As an old boyhood friend, and once indeed
A drover with me on the road to Brighton.
His farm was "grounds," and not a farm at all;
His house among the local sheds and shanties
Rose like a factor's at a trading station.
And be was rich, and I was still a rascal.
I couldn't keep from asking impolitely,
Where bad he been and what had he been doing?
How did he get so? (Rich was understood.)
In dealing in "old rags" in San Francisco....Read More

by Longfellow, Henry Wadsworth
...sea; 
And I on the opposite shore will be, 
Ready to ride and spread the alarm 
Through every Middlesex village and farm, 
For the country-folk to be up and to arm." 

Then he said "Good night!" and with muffled oar 
Silently rowed to the Charlestown shore, 
Just as the moon rose over the bay, 
Where swinging wide at her moorings lay 
The Somerset, British man-of-war: 
A phantom ship, with each mast and spar 
Across the moon, like a prison-bar, 
And a huge b...Read More

by Whittier, John Greenleaf
...r the fields, 
Seems nowhere to alight: the whited air 
Hides hills and woods, the river and the heaven, 
And veils the farm-house at the garden's end. 
The sled and traveller stopped, the courier's feet 
Delayed, all friends shut out, the housemates sit 
Around the radiant fireplace, enclosed 
In a tumultuous privacy of Storm." 
Emerson,The Snow Storm. 


The sun that brief December day 
Rose cheerless over hills of gray, 
And, darkly circled, gave at noon 
A sad...Read More

by Whitman, Walt
...ordain’d with cross’d hands at the altar; 
The spinning-girl retreats and advances to the hum of the big wheel; 
The farmer stops by the bars, as he walks on a First-day loafe, and looks at the
 oats and rye; 
The lunatic is carried at last to the asylum, a confirm’d case, 
(He will never sleep any more as he did in the cot in his mother’s
 bed-room;)
The jour printer with gray head and gaunt jaws works at his case, 
He turns his quid of tobacco, while his eyes blurr...Read More

by Whitman, Walt
...ca! (And thou, ineffable Guest and Sister!) 
For thee come trooping up thy waters and thy lands:
Behold! thy fields and farms, thy far-off woods and mountains, 
As in procession coming. 

Behold! the sea itself! 
And on its limitless, heaving breast, thy ships: 
See! where their white sails, bellying in the wind, speckle the green and blue!
See! thy steamers coming and going, steaming in or out of port! 
See! dusky and undulating, their long pennants of smoke! 

Behold, i...Read More

by Whitman, Walt
...all without labor or
 purchase—abstracting
 the feast, yet not abstracting one particle of it; 
To take the best of the farmer’s farm and the rich man’s elegant villa, and the chaste
 blessings
 of the well-married couple, and the fruits of orchards and flowers of gardens, 
To take to your use out of the compact cities as you pass through, 
To carry buildings and streets with you afterward wherever you go,
To gather the minds of men out of their brains as you encounter them—t...Read More

by Rich, Adrienne
...still.
We are a small and lonely human race
Showing no sign of mastering solitude
Out on this stony planet that we farm.
The most that we can do for one another
Is let our blunders and our blind mischances
Argue a certain brusque abrupt compassion.
We might as well be truthful. I should say
They're luckiest who know they're not unique;
But only art or common interchange
Can teach that kindest truth. And even art
Can only hint at what disturbed a Melville
...Read More

by Chesterton, G K
...west was clear and warm,
The smoke of evening food and ease
Rose like a blue tree in the trees
When he came to Eldred's farm.

But Eldred's farm was fallen awry,
Like an old cripple's bones,
And Eldred's tools were red with rust,
And on his well was a green crust,
And purple thistles upward thrust,
Between the kitchen stones.

But smoke of some good feasting
Went upwards evermore,
And Eldred's doors stood wide apart
For loitering foot or labouring cart,
And Eldred's g...Read More

by Goldsmith, Oliver
...,
Where humble happiness endeared each scene;
How often have I paused on every charm,
The sheltered cot, the cultivated farm,
The never-failing brook, the busy mill,
The decent church that topped the neighbouring hill,
The hawthorn bush, with seats beneath the shade,
For talking age and whispering lovers made;
How often have I blessed the coming day,
When toil remitting lent its turn to play,
And all the village train, from labour free,
Led up their sports beneath the spreadi...Read More

by Masefield, John
...ry-pit they say 
Head-keeper Pike was made away. 
He walks, head-keeper Pike, for harm, 
He taps the windows of the farm; 
The blood drips from his broken chin, 
He taps and begs to be let in. 
On Wood Top, nights, I've shaked to hark 
The peewits wambling in the dark 
Lest in the dark the old man might 
Creep up to me to beg a light.

But Wood Top grass is short and sweet 
And springy to a boxer's feet; 
At harvest hum the moon so bright 
Did shine on Wood Top fo...Read More

by Tebb, Barry
...bound

The corner tight then up and off to Thurstonland, past the weathered

Walls of the abandoned quarry, beyond Ings Farm where Rover ran

His furious challenge to our call.



We had little, so little it might have been nothing at all

The few hundred books we’d brought and furniture bought

At auction in the town, left-overs knocked down to the few pounds

We had between us, dumped outside the red front door by the

Carrier’s cart; stared at by neighbours constantly ...Read More

by Bronte, Charlotte
...d 
May redden in some lonely wood 
The knife of treachery ? 

Say'st thou­that where we lodge each night, 
In each lone farm, or lonelier hall 
Of Norman Peer­ere morning light 
Suspicion must as duly fall,
As day returns­such vigilance 
Presides and watches over France, 
Such rigour governs all ? 

I fear not, William; dost thou fear ? 
So that the knife does not divide, 
It may be ever hovering near: 
I could not tremble at thy side, 
And strenuous love­like mine for thee­
...Read More

by Whitman, Walt
...so flow onward to others—you and I flow onward,
But in due time, you and I shall take less interest in them. 

Your farm, profits, crops,—to think how engross’d you are! 
To think there will still be farms, profits, crops—yet for you, of what avail? 

6
What will be, will be well—for what is, is well, 
To take interest is well, and not to take interest shall be well.

The sky continues beautiful, 
The pleasure of men with women shall never be sated, nor the pleasure o...Read More

by Wordsworth, William
...rning sun shone bright and warm;  "Kilve," said I, "was a pleasant place,  And so is Liswyn farm."   "My little boy, which like you more,"  I said and took him by the arm—  "Our home by Kilve's delightful shore,  Or here at Liswyn farm?"   "And tell me, had you rather be,"  I said and held-him by the arm,  "At Kilve's smooth shore by ...Read More

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