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Best Famous Thomas Hardy Poems

Here is a collection of the all-time best famous Thomas Hardy poems. This is a select list of the best famous Thomas Hardy poetry. Reading, writing, and enjoying famous Thomas Hardy poetry (as well as classical and contemporary poems) is a great past time. These top poems are the best examples of thomas hardy poems.

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Written by Robert William Service | Create an image from this poem

Hero Worship

 Said he: "You saw the Master clear;
By Rushy Pond alone he sat,
Serene and silent as a seer,
in tweedy coat and seedy hat.
you tell me you did not intrude, (Although his book was in your hand,) Upon his melancholy mood .
.
.
I do not understand.
"You did not tell him: 'I have come From o'er the sea to speak to you.
' You did not dare, your lips were dumb .
.
.
You thought a little zephyr blew From Rushy Pond a touch of him You'll cherish to your dying day, Perhaps with tears your eyes were dim .
.
.
And then - you went away.
"And down the years you will proclaim: 'O call me dullard, dub me dunce! But let this be my meed of fame: I looked on Thomas Hardy once.
Aye, by a stile I stood a span And with these eyes did plainly see A little, shrinking, shabby man .
.
.
But Oh a god to me!'" Said I: "'Tis true, I scarce dared look, yet he would have been kind, I'm sure; But though I clutched his precious book I feared to beg his signature.
Ah yes, my friend, I merit mirth.
You're bold, you have the right to laugh, And if Christ came again to earth You'd cadge his autograph.
"


Written by Robert William Service | Create an image from this poem

Boon Soul

 Behold! I'm old; my hair is white;
My eighty years are in the offing,
And sitting by the fire to-night
I sip a grog to ease my coughing.
It's true I'm raucous as a rook, But feeling bibulously "bardy," These lines I'm scribbling in a book: The verse complete of Thomas Hardy.
Although to-day he's read by few, Him have I loved beyond all measure; So here to-night I riffle through His pages with the oldtime pleasure; And with this book upon my knee, (To-day so woefully neglected) I muse and think how soon I'll be Myself among the Great Rejected.
Yet as these lines with zest I write, Although the hour for me is tardy, I think: "Of all the world to-night 'Tis I alone am reading Hardy"; And now to me he seems so nigh I feel I commune with his spirit, And as none love him more than I, Thereby I gain a modest merit.
Oh Brother Thomas, glad I'll be, Though all the world may pass unheeding, If some greybeard con over me, As I to-night your rhymes are reading; Saying: "Old Bastard, you and I By sin are knit in mind and body.
.
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" So ere to hit the hay I hie Your ghost I'll toast in midnight toddy.