Get Your Premium Membership

Best Famous Canary Poems

Here is a collection of the all-time best famous Canary poems. This is a select list of the best famous Canary poetry. Reading, writing, and enjoying famous Canary poetry (as well as classical and contemporary poems) is a great past time. These top poems are the best examples of canary poems.

Search for the best famous Canary poems, articles about Canary poems, poetry blogs, or anything else Canary poem related using the PoetrySoup search engine at the top of the page.

See Also:

Poems are below...



12
Written by John Keats | Create an image from this poem

Lines On The Mermaid Tavern

 Souls of Poets dead and gone,
What Elysium have ye known,
Happy field or mossy cavern,
Choicer than the Mermaid Tavern?
Have ye tippled drink more fine
Than mine host's Canary wine?
Or are fruits of Paradise
Sweeter than those dainty pies
Of venison? O generous food!
Drest as though bold Robin Hood
Would, with his maid Marian,
Sup and bowse from horn and can.
I have heard that on a day Mine host's sign-board flew away, Nobody knew whither, till An astrologer's old quill To a sheepskin gave the story, Said he saw you in your glory, Underneath a new old sign Sipping beverage divine, And pledging with contented smack The Mermaid in the Zodiac.
Souls of Poets dead and gone, What Elysium have ye known, Happy field or mossy cavern, Choicer than the Mermaid Tavern?
Written by T S (Thomas Stearns) Eliot | Create an image from this poem

Growltigers Last Stand

 GROWLTIGER was a Bravo Cat, who lived upon a barge;
In fact he was the roughest cat that ever roamed at large.
From Gravesend up to Oxford he pursued his evil aims, Rejoicing in his title of "The Terror of the Thames.
" His manners and appearance did not calculate to please; His coat was torn and seedy, he was baggy at the knees; One ear was somewhat missing, no need to tell you why, And he scowled upon a hostile world from one forbidding eye.
The cottagers of Rotherhithe knew something of his fame, At Hammersmith and Putney people shuddered at his name.
They would fortify the hen-house, lock up the silly goose, When the rumour ran along the shore: GROWLTIGER'S ON THE LOOSE! Woe to the weak canary, that fluttered from its cage; Woe to the pampered Pekinese, that faced Growltiger's rage.
Woe to the bristly Bandicoot, that lurks on foreign ships, And woe to any Cat with whom Growltiger came to grips! But most to Cats of foreign race his hatred had been vowed; To Cats of foreign name and race no quarter was allowed.
The Persian and the Siamese regarded him with fear-- Because it was a Siamese had mauled his missing ear.
Now on a peaceful summer night, all nature seemed at play, The tender moon was shining bright, the barge at Molesey lay.
All in the balmy moonlight it lay rocking on the tide-- And Growltiger was disposed to show his sentimental side.
His bucko mate, GRUMBUSKIN, long since had disappeared, For to the Bell at Hampton he had gone to wet his beard; And his bosun, TUMBLEBRUTUS, he too had stol'n away- In the yard behind the Lion he was prowling for his prey.
In the forepeak of the vessel Growltiger sate alone, Concentrating his attention on the Lady GRIDDLEBONE.
And his raffish crew were sleeping in their barrels and their bunks-- As the Siamese came creeping in their sampans and their junks.
Growltiger had no eye or ear for aught but Griddlebone, And the Lady seemed enraptured by his manly baritone, Disposed to relaxation, and awaiting no surprise-- But the moonlight shone reflected from a thousand bright blue eyes.
And closer still and closer the sampans circled round, And yet from all the enemy there was not heard a sound.
The lovers sang their last duet, in danger of their lives-- For the foe was armed with toasting forks and cruel carving knives.
Then GILBERT gave the signal to his fierce Mongolian horde; With a frightful burst of fireworks the Chinks they swarmed aboard.
Abandoning their sampans, and their pullaways and junks, They battened down the hatches on the crew within their bunks.
Then Griddlebone she gave a screech, for she was badly skeered; I am sorry to admit it, but she quickly disappeared.
She probably escaped with ease, I'm sure she was not drowned-- But a serried ring of flashing steel Growltiger did surround.
The ruthless foe pressed forward, in stubborn rank on rank; Growltiger to his vast surprise was forced to walk the plank.
He who a hundred victims had driven to that drop, At the end of all his crimes was forced to go ker-flip, ker-flop.
Oh there was joy in Wapping when the news flew through the land; At Maidenhead and Henley there was dancing on the strand.
Rats were roasted whole at Brentford, and at Victoria Dock, And a day of celebration was commanded in Bangkok.
Written by Alfonsina Storni | Create an image from this poem

Little Little Man

 Little little man, little little man,
set free your canary that wants to fly.
I am that canary, little little man, leave me to fly.
I was in your cage, little little man, little little man who gave me my cage.
I say "little little" because you don't understand me Nor will you understand.
Nor do I understand you, but meanwhile, open for me the cage from which I want to escape.
Little little man, I loved you half an hour, Don't ask me again.
Written by Robert William Service | Create an image from this poem

The Sewing-Girl

 The humble garret where I dwell
Is in that Quarter called the Latin;
It isn't spacious -- truth to tell,
There's hardly room to swing a cat in.
But what of that! It's there I fight For food and fame, my Muse inviting, And all the day and half the night You'll find me writing, writing, writing.
Now, it was in the month of May As, wrestling with a rhyme rheumatic, I chanced to look across the way, And lo! within a neighbor attic, A hand drew back the window shade, And there, a picture glad and glowing, I saw a sweet and slender maid, And she was sewing, sewing, sewing.
So poor the room, so small, so scant, Yet somehow oh, so bright and airy.
There was a pink geranium plant, Likewise a very pert canary.
And in the maiden's heart it seemed Some fount of gladness must be springing, For as alone I sadly dreamed I heard her singing, singing, singing.
God love her! how it cheered me then To see her there so brave and pretty; So she with needle, I with pen, We slaved and sang above the city.
And as across my streams of ink I watched her from a poet's distance, She stitched and sang .
.
.
I scarcely think She was aware of my existence.
And then one day she sang no more.
That put me out, there's no denying.
I looked -- she labored as before, But, bless me! she was crying, crying.
Her poor canary chirped in vain; Her pink geranium drooped in sorrow; "Of course," said I, "she'll sing again.
Maybe," I sighed, "she will to-morrow.
" Poor child; 'twas finished with her song: Day after day her tears were flowing; And as I wondered what was wrong She pined and peaked above her sewing.
And then one day the blind she drew, Ah! though I sought with vain endeavor To pierce the darkness, well I knew My sewing-girl had gone for ever.
And as I sit alone to-night My eyes unto her room are turning .
.
.
I'd give the sum of all I write Once more to see her candle burning, Once more to glimpse her happy face, And while my rhymes of cheer I'm ringing, Across the sunny sweep of space To hear her singing, singing, singing.
Written by Amy Clampitt | Create an image from this poem

A Hedge Of Rubber Trees

 The West Village by then was changing; before long
the rundown brownstones at its farthest edge
would have slipped into trendier hands.
She lived, impervious to trends, behind a potted hedge of rubber trees, with three cats, a canary—refuse from whose cage kept sifting down and then germinating, a yearning seedling choir, around the saucers on the windowsill—and an inexorable cohort of roaches she was too nearsighted to deal with, though she knew they were there, and would speak of them, ruefully, as of an affliction that might once, long ago, have been prevented.
Unclassifiable castoffs, misfits, marginal cases: when you're one yourself, or close to it, there's a reassurance in proving you haven't quite gone under by taking up with somebody odder than you are.
Or trying to.
"They're my friends," she'd say of her cats—Mollie, Mitzi and Caroline, their names were, and she was forever taking one or another in a cab to the vet—as though she had no others.
The roommate who'd become a nun, the one who was Jewish, the couple she'd met on a foliage tour, one fall, were all people she no longer saw.
She worked for a law firm, said all the judges were alcoholic, had never voted.
But would sometimes have me to dinner—breaded veal, white wine, strawberry Bavarian—and sometimes, from what she didn't know she was saying, I'd snatch a shred or two of her threadbare history.
Baltic cold.
Being sent home in a troika when her feet went numb.
In summer, carriage rides.
A swarm of gypsy children driven off with whips.
An octogenarian father, bishop of a dying schismatic sect.
A very young mother who didn't want her.
A half-brother she met just once.
Cousins in Wisconsin, one of whom phoned her from a candy store, out of the blue, while she was living in Chicago.
What had brought her there, or when, remained unclear.
As did much else.
We'd met in church.
I noticed first a big, soaring soprano with a wobble in it, then the thickly wreathed and braided crimp in the mouse- gold coiffure.
Old? Young? She was of no age.
Through rimless lenses she looked out of a child's, or a doll's, globular blue.
Wore Keds the year round, tended otherwise to overdress.
Owned a mandolin.
Once I got her to take it down from the mantel and plink out, through a warm fuddle of sauterne, a lot of giddy Italian airs from a songbook whose pages had started to crumble.
The canary fluffed and quivered, and the cats, amazed, came out from under the couch and stared.
What could the offspring of the schismatic age and a reluctant child bride expect from life? Not much.
Less and less.
A dream she'd had kept coming back, years after.
She'd taken a job in Washington with some right-wing lobby, and lived in one of those bow-windowed mansions that turn into roominghouses, and her room there had a full-length mirror: oval, with a molding, is the way I picture it.
In her dream something woke her, she got up to look, and there in the glass she'd had was covered over—she gave it a wondering emphasis—with gray veils.
The West Village was changing.
I was changing.
The last time I asked her to dinner, she didn't show.
Hours— or was it days?—later, she phoned to explain: she hadn't been able to find my block; a patrolman had steered her home.
I spent my evenings canvassing for Gene McCarthy.
Passing, I'd see her shades drawn, no light behind the rubber trees.
She wasn't out, she didn't own a TV.
She was in there, getting gently blotto.
What came next, I wasn't brave enough to know.
Only one day, passing, I saw new shades, quick-chic matchstick bamboo, going up where the waterstained old ones had been, and where the seedlings— O gray veils, gray veils—had risen and gone down.
Written by Robert Herrick | Create an image from this poem

A PANEGYRIC TO SIR LEWIS PEMBERTON

 Till I shall come again, let this suffice,
I send my salt, my sacrifice
To thee, thy lady, younglings, and as far
As to thy Genius and thy Lar;
To the worn threshold, porch, hall, parlour, kitchen,
The fat-fed smoking temple, which in
The wholesome savour of thy mighty chines,
Invites to supper him who dines:
Where laden spits, warp'd with large ribs of beef,
Not represent, but give relief
To the lank stranger and the sour swain,
Where both may feed and come again;
For no black-bearded Vigil from thy door
Beats with a button'd-staff the poor;
But from thy warm love-hatching gates, each may
Take friendly morsels, and there stay
To sun his thin-clad members, if he likes;
For thou no porter keep'st who strikes.
No comer to thy roof his guest-rite wants; Or, staying there, is scourged with taunts Of some rough groom, who, yirk'd with corns, says, 'Sir, 'You've dipp'd too long i' th' vinegar; 'And with our broth and bread and bits, Sir friend, 'You've fared well; pray make an end; 'Two days you've larded here; a third, ye know, 'Makes guests and fish smell strong; pray go 'You to some other chimney, and there take 'Essay of other giblets; make 'Merry at another's hearth; you're here 'Welcome as thunder to our beer; 'Manners knows distance, and a man unrude 'Would soon recoil, and not intrude 'His stomach to a second meal.
'--No, no, Thy house, well fed and taught, can show No such crabb'd vizard: Thou hast learnt thy train With heart and hand to entertain; And by the arms-full, with a breast unhid, As the old race of mankind did, When either's heart, and either's hand did strive To be the nearer relative; Thou dost redeem those times: and what was lost Of ancient honesty, may boast It keeps a growth in thee, and so will run A course in thy fame's pledge, thy son.
Thus, like a Roman Tribune, thou thy gate Early sets ope to feast, and late; Keeping no currish waiter to affright, With blasting eye, the appetite, Which fain would waste upon thy cates, but that The trencher creature marketh what Best and more suppling piece he cuts, and by Some private pinch tells dangers nigh, A hand too desp'rate, or a knife that bites Skin-deep into the pork, or lights Upon some part of kid, as if mistook, When checked by the butler's look.
No, no, thy bread, thy wine, thy jocund beer Is not reserved for Trebius here, But all who at thy table seated are, Find equal freedom, equal fare; And thou, like to that hospitable god, Jove, joy'st when guests make their abode To eat thy bullocks thighs, thy veals, thy fat Wethers, and never grudged at.
The pheasant, partridge, gotwit, reeve, ruff, rail, The cock, the curlew, and the quail, These, and thy choicest viands, do extend Their tastes unto the lower end Of thy glad table; not a dish more known To thee, than unto any one: But as thy meat, so thy immortal wine Makes the smirk face of each to shine, And spring fresh rose-buds, while the salt, the wit, Flows from the wine, and graces it; While Reverence, waiting at the bashful board, Honours my lady and my lord.
No scurril jest, no open scene is laid Here, for to make the face afraid; But temp'rate mirth dealt forth, and so discreet- Ly, that it makes the meat more sweet, And adds perfumes unto the wine, which thou Dost rather pour forth, than allow By cruse and measure; thus devoting wine, As the Canary isles were thine; But with that wisdom and that method, as No one that's there his guilty glass Drinks of distemper, or has cause to cry Repentance to his liberty.
No, thou know'st orders, ethics, and hast read All oeconomics, know'st to lead A house-dance neatly, and canst truly show How far a figure ought to go, Forward or backward, side-ward, and what pace Can give, and what retract a grace; What gesture, courtship, comeliness agrees, With those thy primitive decrees, To give subsistence to thy house, and proof What Genii support thy roof, Goodness and greatness, not the oaken piles; For these, and marbles have their whiles To last, but not their ever; virtue's hand It is which builds 'gainst fate to stand.
Such is thy house, whose firm foundations trust Is more in thee than in her dust, Or depth; these last may yield, and yearly shrink, When what is strongly built, no chink Or yawning rupture can the same devour, But fix'd it stands, by her own power And well-laid bottom, on the iron and rock, Which tries, and counter-stands the shock And ram of time, and by vexation grows The stronger.
Virtue dies when foes Are wanting to her exercise, but, great And large she spreads by dust and sweat.
Safe stand thy walls, and thee, and so both will, Since neither's height was raised by th'ill Of others; since no stud, no stone, no piece Was rear'd up by the poor-man's fleece; No widow's tenement was rack'd to gild Or fret thy cieling, or to build A sweating-closet, to anoint the silk- Soft skin, or bath[e] in asses' milk; No orphan's pittance, left him, served to set The pillars up of lasting jet, For which their cries might beat against thine ears, Or in the damp jet read their tears.
No plank from hallow'd altar does appeal To yond' Star-chamber, or does seal A curse to thee, or thine; but all things even Make for thy peace, and pace to heaven.
--Go on directly so, as just men may A thousand times more swear, than say This is that princely Pemberton, who can Teach men to keep a God in man; And when wise poets shall search out to see Good men, they find them all in thee.
Written by Andrew Marvell | Create an image from this poem

Blakes Victory

 On the Victory Obtained by Blake over the Spaniards in the Bay of Santa Cruz, in the Island of Tenerife, 1657

Now does Spain's fleet her spacious wings unfold, 
Leaves the New World and hastens for the old: 
But though the wind was fair, they slowly swum 
Freighted with acted guilt, and guilt to come: 
For this rich load, of which so proud they are, 
Was raised by tyranny, and raised for war; 
Every capacious gallion's womb was filled, 
With what the womb of wealthy kingdoms yield, 
The New World's wounded entrails they had tore, 
For wealth wherewith to wound the Old once more: 
Wealth which all others' avarice might cloy, 
But yet in them caused as much fear as joy.
For now upon the main, themselves they saw-- That boundless empire, where you give the law-- Of winds' and waters' rage, they fearful be, But much more fearful are your flags to see.
Day, that to those who sail upon the deep, More wished for, and more welcome is than sleep, They dreaded to behold, lest the sun's light, With English streamers, should salute their sight: In thickest darkness they would choose to steer, So that such darkness might suppress their fear; At length theirs vanishes, and fortune smiles; For they behold the sweet Canary Isles; One of which doubtless is by Nature blessed Above both Worlds, since 'tis above the rest.
For lest some gloominess might strain her sky, Trees there the duty of the clouds supply; O noble trust which heav'n on this isle pours, Fertile to be, yet never need her show'rs.
A happy people, which at once do gain The benefits without the ills of rain.
Both health and profit fate cannot deny; Where still the earth is moist, the air still dry; The jarring elements no discord know, Fuel and rain together kindly grow; And coolness there, with heat doth never fight, This only rules by day, and that by night.
Your worth to all these isles, a just right brings, The best of lands should have the best of kings.
And these want nothing heaven can afford, Unless it be--the having you their Lord; But this great want will not a long one prove, Your conquering sword will soon that want remove.
For Spain had better--she'll ere long confess-- Have broken all her swords, than this one peace, Casting that legue off, which she held so long, She cast off that which only made her strong.
Forces and art, she soon will feel, are vain, Peace, against you, was the sole strength of Spain.
By that alone those islands she secures, Peace made them hers, but war will make them yours.
There the indulgent soil that rich grape breeds, Which of the gods the fancied drink exceeds; They still do yield, such is their precious mould, All that is good, and are not cursed with gold-- With fatal gold, for still where that does grow, Neither the soil, not people, quiet know.
Which troubles men to raise it when 'tis ore, And when 'tis raised, does trouble them much more.
Ah, why was thither brought that cause of war, Kind Nature had from thence removed so far? In vain doth she those islands free from ill, If fortune can make guilty what she will.
But whilst I draw that scene, where you ere long, Shall conquests act, your present are unsung.
For Santa Cruz the glad fleet makes her way, And safely there casts anchor in the bay.
Never so many with one joyful cry, That place saluted, where they all must die.
Deluded men! Fate with you did but sport, You 'scaped the sea, to perish in your port.
'Twas more for England's fame you should die there, Where you had most of strength, and least of fear.
The Peak's proud height the Spaniards all admire, Yet in their breasts carry a pride much high'r.
Only to this vast hill a power is given, At once both to inhabit earth and heaven.
But this stupendous prospect did not near, Make them admire, so much as they did fear.
For here they met with news, which did produce, A grief, above the cure of grapes' best juice.
They learned with terror that nor summer's heat, Nor winter's storms, had made your fleet retreat.
To fight against such foes was vain, they knew, Which did the rage of elements subdue, Who on the ocean that does horror give, To all besides, triumphantly do live.
With haste they therefore all their gallions moor, And flank with cannon from the neighbouring shore.
Forts, lines, and scones all the bay along, They build and act all that can make them strong.
Fond men who know not whilst such works they raise, They only labour to exalt your praise.
Yet they by restless toil became at length, So proud and confident of their made strength, That they with joy their boasting general heard, Wish then for that assault he lately feared.
His wish he has, for now undaunted Blake, With wing?d speed, for Santa Cruz does make.
For your renown, his conquering fleet does ride, O'er seas as vast as is the Spaniards' pride.
Whose fleet and trenches viewed, he soon did say, `We to their strength are more obliged than they.
Were't not for that, they from their fate would run, And a third world seek out, our arms to shun.
Those forts, which there so high and strong appear, Do not so much suppress, as show their fear.
Of speedy victory let no man doubt, Our worst work's past, now we have found them out.
Behold their navy does at anchor lie, And they are ours, for now they cannot fly.
' This said, the whole fleet gave it their applause, And all assumes your courage, in your cause.
That bay they enter, which unto them owes, The noblest of wreaths, that victory bestows.
Bold Stayner leads: this fleet's designed by fate, To give him laurel, as the last did plate.
The thundering cannon now begins the fight, And though it be at noon creates a night.
The air was soon after the fight begun, Far more enflamed by it than by the sun.
Never so burning was that climate known, War turned the temperate to the torrid zone.
Fate these two fleets between both worlds had brought, Who fight, as if for both those worlds they fought.
Thousands of ways thousands of men there die, Some ships are sunk, some blown up in the sky.
Nature ne'er made cedars so high aspire, As oaks did then urged by the active fire, Which by quick powder's force, so high was sent, That it returned to its own element.
Torn limbs some leagues into the island fly, Whilst others lower in the sea do lie, Scarce souls from bodies severed are so far By death, as bodies there were by the war.
The all-seeing sun, ne'er gazed on such a sight, Two dreadful navies there at anchor fight.
And neither have or power or will to fly, There one must conquer, or there both must die.
Far different motives yet engaged them thus, Necessity did them, but Choice did us.
A choice which did the highest worth express, And was attended by as high success.
For your resistless genius there did reign, By which we laurels reaped e'en on the main.
So properous stars, though absent to the sense, Bless those they shine for, by their influence.
Our cannon now tears every ship and sconce, And o'er two elements triumphs at once.
Their gallions sunk, their wealth the sea doth fill-- The only place where it can cause no ill.
Ah, would those treasures which both Indies have, Were buried in as large, and deep a grave, Wars' chief support with them would buried be, And the land owe her peace unto the sea.
Ages to come your conquering arms will bless, There they destroy what had destroyed their peace.
And in one war the present age may boast The certain seeds of many wars are lost.
All the foe's ships destroyed, by sea or fire, Victorious Blake, does from the bay retire, His siege of Spain he then again pursues, And there first brings of his success the news: The saddest news that e'er to Spain was brought, Their rich fleet sunk, and ours with laurel fraught, Whilst fame in every place her trumpet blows, And tells the world how much to you it owes.
Written by Andrew Marvell | Create an image from this poem

On The Victory Obtained By Blake Over the Spaniards In The Bay Of Scanctacruze In The Island Of teneriff.1657

 Now does Spains Fleet her spatious wings unfold,
Leaves the new World and hastens for the old:
But though the wind was fair, the slowly swoome
Frayted with acted Guilt, and Guilt to come:
For this rich load, of which so proud they are,
Was rais'd by Tyranny, and rais'd for war;
Every capatious Gallions womb was fill'd,
With what the Womb of wealthy Kingdomes yield,
The new Worlds wounded Intails they had tore,
For wealth wherewith to wound the old once more.
Wealth which all others Avarice might cloy, But yet in them caus'd as much fear, as Joy.
For now upon the Main, themselves they saw, That boundless Empire, where you give the law, Of winds and waters rage, they fearful be, But much more fearful are your Flags to see Day, that to these who sail upon the deep, More wish't for, and more welcome is then sleep, They dreaded to behold, Least the Sun's light, With English Streamers, should salute their sight: In thickest darkness they would choose to steer, So that such darkness might suppress their fear; At length theirs vanishes, and fortune smiles; For they behold the sweet Canary Isles.
One of which doubtless is by Nature blest Above both Worlds, since 'tis above the rest.
For least some Gloominess might stain her sky, Trees there the duty of the Clouds supply; O noble Trust which Heaven on this Isle poures, Fertile to be, yet never need her showres.
A happy People, which at once do gain The benefits without the ills of rain.
Both health and profit, Fate cannot deny; Where still the Earth is moist, the Air still dry; The jarring Elements no discord know, Fewel and Rain together kindly grow; And coolness there, with heat doth never fight, This only rules by day, and that by Night.
Your worth to all these Isles, a just right brings, The best of Lands should have the best of Kings.
And these want nothing Heaven can afford, Unless it be, the having you their Lord; But this great want, will not along one prove, Your Conquering Sword will soon that want remove.
For Spain had better, Shee'l ere long confess, Have broken all her Swords, then this one Peace, Casting that League off, which she held so long, She cast off that which only made her strong.
Forces and art, she soon will feel, are vain, Peace, against you, was the sole strength of Spain.
By that alone those Islands she secures, Peace made them hers, but War will make them yours; There the indulgent Soil that rich Grape breeds, Which of the Gods the fancied drink exceeds; They still do yield, such is their pretious mould, All that is good, and are not curst with Gold.
With fatal Gold, for still where that does grow, Neither the Soyl, nor People quiet know.
Which troubles men to raise it when 'tis Oar, And when 'tis raised, does trouble them much more.
Ah, why was thither brought that cause of War, Kind Nature had from thence remov'd so far.
In vain doth she those Islands free from Ill, If fortune can make guilty what she will.
But whilst I draw that Scene, where you ere long, Shall conquests act, your present are unsung, For Sanctacruze the glad Fleet takes her way, And safely there casts Anchor in the Bay.
Never so many with one joyful cry, That place saluted, where they all must dye.
Deluded men! Fate with you did but sport, You scap't the Sea, to perish in your Port.
'Twas more for Englands fame you should dye there, Where you had most of strength, and least of fear.
The Peek's proud height, the Spaniards all admire, Yet in their brests, carry a pride much higher.
Onely to this vast hill a power is given, At once both to Inhabit Earth and Heaven.
But this stupendious Prospect did not neer, Make them admire, so much as as they did fear.
For here they met with news, which did produce, A grief, above the cure of Grapes best juice.
They learn'd with Terrour, that nor Summers heat, Nor Winters storms, had made your Fleet retreat.
To fight against such Foes, was vain they knew, Which did the rage of Elements subdue.
Who on the Ocean that does horror give, To all besides, triumphantly do live.
With hast they therefore all their Gallions moar, And flank with Cannon from the Neighbouring shore.
Forts, Lines, and Sconces all the Bay along, They build and act all that can make them strong.
Fond men who know not whilst such works they raise, They only Labour to exalt your praise.
Yet they by restless toyl, because at Length, So proud and confident of their made strength.
That they with joy their boasting General heard, Wish then for that assault he lately fear'd.
His wish he has, for now undaunted Blake, With winged speed, for Sanctacruze does make.
For your renown, his conquering Fleet does ride, Ore Seas as vast as is the Spaniards pride.
Whose Fleet and Trenches view'd, he soon did say, We to their Strength are more obilg'd then they.
Wer't not for that, they from their Fate would run, And a third World seek out our Armes to shun.
Those Forts, which there, so high and strong appear, Do not so much suppress, as shew their fear.
Of Speedy Victory let no man doubt, Our worst works past, now we have found them out.
Behold their Navy does at Anchor lye, And they are ours, for now they cannot fly.
This said, the whole Fleet gave it their applause, And all assumes your courage, in your cause.
That Bay they enter, which unto them owes, The noblest wreaths, that Victory bestows.
Bold Stainer Leads, this Fleets design'd by fate, To give him Lawrel, as the Last did Plate.
The Thund'ring Cannon now begins the Fight, And though it be at Noon, creates a Night.
The Air was soon after the fight begun, Far more enflam'd by it, then by the Sun.
Never so burning was that Climate known, War turn'd the temperate, to the Torrid Zone.
Fate these two Fleets, between both Worlds had brought.
Who fight, as if for both those Worlds they fought.
Thousands of wayes, Thousands of men there dye, Some Ships are sunk, some blown up in the skie.
Nature never made Cedars so high a Spire, As Oakes did then.
Urg'd by the active fire.
Which by quick powders force, so high was sent, That it return'd to its own Element.
Torn Limbs some leagues into the Island fly, Whilst others lower, in the Sea do lye.
Scarce souls from bodies sever'd are so far, By death, as bodies there were by the War.
Th'all-seeing Sun, neer gaz'd on such a sight, Two dreadful Navies there at Anchor Fight.
And neither have, or power, or will to fly, There one must Conquer, or there both must dye.
Far different Motives yet, engag'd them thus, Necessity did them, but Choice did us.
A choice which did the highest forth express, And was attended by as high success.
For your resistless genious there did Raign, By which we Laurels reapt ev'n on the Mayn.
So prosperous Stars, though absent to the sence, Bless those they shine for, by their Influence.
Our Cannon now tears every Ship and Sconce, And o're two Elements Triumphs at once.
Their Gallions sunk, their wealth the Sea does fill, The only place where it can cause no ill, Ah would those Treasures which both Indies have, Were buryed in as large, and deep a grave, Wars chief support with them would buried be, And the Land owe her peace unto the Sea.
Ages to come, your conquering Arms will bless, There they destroy, what had destroy'd their Peace.
And in one War the present age may boast, The certain seeds of many Wars are lost, All the Foes Ships destroy'd, by Sea or fire, Victorious Blake, does from the Bay retire, His Seige of Spain he then again pursues, And there first brings of his success the news; The saddest news that ere to Spain was brought, Their rich Fleet sunk, and ours with Lawrel fraught.
Whilst fame in every place, her Trumpet blowes, And tells the World, how much to you it owes.
Written by Mother Goose | Create an image from this poem

Mary's Canary

 

Mary had a pretty bird,
  Feathers bright and yellow,
Slender legs--upon my word
  He was a pretty fellow!
The sweetest note he always sung,
  Which much delighted Mary.
She often, where the cage was hung,
  Sat hearing her canary.
Written by Philip Levine | Create an image from this poem

Heaven

 If you were twenty-seven 
and had done time for beating 
our ex-wife and had 
no dreams you remembered 
in the morning, you might 
lie on your bed and listen 
to a mad canary sing 
and think it all right to be 
there every Saturday 
ignoring your neighbors, the streets, 
the signs that said join, 
and the need to be helping.
You might build, as he did, a network of golden ladders so that the bird could roam on all levels of the room; you might paint the ceiling blue, the floor green, and shade the place you called the sun so that things came softly to order when the light came on.
He and the bird lived in the fine weather of heaven; they never aged, they never tired or wanted all through that war, but when it was over and the nation had been saved, he knew they'd be hunted.
He knew, as you would too, that he'd be laid off for not being braver and it would do no good to show how he had taken clothespins and cardboard and made each step safe.
It would do no good to have been one of the few that climbed higher and higher even in time of war, for now there would be the poor asking for their share, and hurt men in uniforms, and no one to believe that heaven was really here.
12