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Antonin Artaud

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Biography | All Poems | Best Poems | Short Poems | Quotes

Comprehensive information about Antonin Artaud including biographical information, facts, literary works, and more. Antonin Artaud (September 4, 1896, in Marseille – March 4, 1948 in Paris) was a French playwright, poet, actor and theatre director. Antonin is a diminutive form of Antoine "little Anthony", and was among a list of names which Artaud used throughout his writing career.. actor playwright poet essayist This educational Antonin Artaud resource has information about the author's life, works, quotations, articles and essays, and more.


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Quote Left All true language is incomprehensible, like the chatter of a beggar's teeth. Quote Right
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Quote Left You are outside life, you are above life, you have miseries which the ordinary man does not know, you exceed the normal level, and it is for this that men refuse to forgive you, you poison their peace of mind, you undermine their stability. You have irrepressible pains whose essence is to be inadaptable to any known state, indescribable in words. You have repeated and shifting pains, incurable pains, pains beyond imagining, pains which are neither of the body nor of the soul, but which partake of both. And I share your suffering, and I ask you: who dares to ration our relief? We are not going to kill ourselves just yet. In the meantime, leave us the hell alone. Quote Right
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Quote Left Tragedy on the stage is no longer enough for me, I shall bring it into my own life. Quote Right
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Quote Left Written poetry is worth reading once, and then should be destroyed. Let the dead poets make way for others. Then we might even come to see that it is our veneration for what has already been created, however beautiful and valid it may be, that petrifies us. Quote Right
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Quote Left Ah! How neatly tied, in these people, is the umbilical cord of morality! Since they left their mothers they have never sinned, have they? They are apostles, they are the descendants of priests; one can only wonder from what source they draw their indignation, and above all how much they have pocketed to do this, and in any case what it has done for them. Quote Right
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