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THE PARABLE OF THE RICH FOOL

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There once was man of means, who owned land that yielded a great harvest. Thus caused the tearing down of a small storage house, to building a greater storage house. Over time, he spent much of it being merry, selling small portions to fill his treasure house, whilst still yielding a great harvest keeping the great storage house full beyond measure, equally so, his treasury. *As scriptured. Jesus was asked to be an arbiter (an adjudicator, one who settles disputes) by a young man in the midst who wanted a fair portion belonging to his brother, whom 'twas given by virtue of birthright being the first born/eldest, according to the Laws of Israel. The younger brother wanted a fair portion of that that was given to his elder brother according to the birthright Laws of Israel. Therefore, the parable was a foreboding of covetousness, that what Heaven hast blest, thou shouldn't hoard as thine own, but to the furtherance of the teachings of Heaven. For what does it purposeth, when no one knoweth the hour when their life becomes forfeit and whatever has been gained, will go to those who had not earned it by labour, nor to those who have no need of it, nor to those who will sell off all your once prized possessions, at less than its true worth and squander it all away. Accumulation of wealth, is necessary but do not imprison thine heart to it and enrich self, but instead, enrich others, both physically and spiritually. Date: 06/22/2019

Copyright © | Year Posted 2019




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Date: 6/22/2019 8:18:00 AM
Let the parables roll...I've heard this one many times...thanks for the bring up...^WW^
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William Kekaula
Date: 6/22/2019 9:00:00 AM
Happy to oblige my friend ~ William