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Achilles, His Heart and Soul Were Mortal

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Robert J. Lindley, 8-04- 2018
Rhyme (Mythology, Great Tales)

Syllables Per Line:
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Total # Syllables:468
Total # Words: 340

Notes-
1. Achilles*: - (Of Troy fame*)
Achilles, in Greek mythology, son of the mortal Peleus, king of the Myrmidons, and the Nereid, or sea nymph, Thetis. Achilles was the bravest, handsomest, and greatest warrior of the army of Agamemnon in the Trojan War. According to Homer, Achilles was brought up by his mother at Phthia with his cousin and inseparable companion Patroclus. One of the non-Homeric tales of his childhood relates that Thetis dipped Achilles in the waters of the River Styx, by which means he became invulnerable, except for the part of his heel by which she held him—the proverbial “Achilles’ heel.”

Read more: http://www.mythencyclopedia.com/Pa-P...#ixzz5NE789BPO
2. (Achilles) father*: - Peleus - Peleus, a figure from Greek mythology, is best known as the father of the Greek hero Achilles* and the husband of the sea nymph Thetis. As a youth, Peleus was banished from his homeland after he killed one of his brothers. Peleus suffered misfortune everywhere he went and fled from two kingdoms during his life.
Zeus* himself arranged for Peleus to marry Thetis. Zeus loved Thetis, but he decided to abandon his courtship when he learned that the fates had declared that Thetis's son would become more powerful than his father. After marrying Peleus, Thetis bore him a son named Achilles. She tried to make the infant immortal by holding him in fire to burn away his human weakness. Peleus, however, was horrified and stopped Thetis, leaving Achilles' heel vulnerable. Angered, Thetis abandoned her family and returned to the sea.

nymph minor goddess of nature, usually represented as young and beautiful
immortal able to live forever
Peleus became king of Phthia, but he was overthrown by his enemies when Achilles left for the Trojan Warf. Thetis took pity on Peleus and brought him back to her sea cave, where they lived together forever.

3.. (Achilles) mother*:- Thetis his mother, was the immortal Nereid Thetis, Thetis attempted to render her son Achilles invulnerable. In the well-known version, she dipped him in the River Styx, holding him by one heel, which remained vulnerable. In an early and less popular version of the story, Thetis anointed the boy in ambrosia and put him on top of a fire to burn away the mortal parts of his body. She was interrupted by Peleus and she abandoned both father and son in a rage, leaving his heel vulnerable. A nearly identical story is told by Plutarch, in his On Isis and Osiris, of the goddess Isis burning away the mortality of Prince Maneros of Byblos, son of Queen Astarte, and being likewise interrupted before completing the process. Later on in life, Achilles is killed by Paris when he is shot in his vulnerable spot, the heel. This is where the term "Achilles' heel" is derived from.

4.Ares* : Ares is the Greek god of war. He is one of the Twelve Olympians, the son of Zeus and Hera. 
In Greek literature, he often represents the physical or violent and ...
Symbols‎: ‎Sword‎, ‎spear‎, ‎shield‎, ‎helmet‎, ‎chariot‎, ...Parents‎: ‎Zeus‎ and ‎Hera

5. Charon*: 
From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
This article is about the mythological figure. For the moon of Pluto, see Charon (moon). For other uses, see Charon (disambiguation).

Attic red-figure lekythos attributed to the Tymbos painter showing Charon welcoming a soul into his boat, c. 500-450 BC
In Greek mythology, Charon or Kharon (/'k??r?n, -?n/; Greek Χ?ρων) is the ferryman of Hades who carries souls of the newly deceased across the rivers Styx and Acheron that divided the world of the living from the world of the dead. A coin to pay Charon for passage, usually an obolus or danake, was sometimes placed in or on the mouth of a dead person.[1] Some authors say that those who could not pay the fee, or those whose bodies were left unburied, had to wander the shores for one hundred years. In the catabasis mytheme, heroes – such as Aeneas, Dionysus, Heracles, Hermes, Odysseus, Orpheus, Pirithous, Psyche, Theseus and Sisyphus – journey to the underworld and return, still alive, conveyed by the boat of Charon.

6. Styx*": From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
"River Styx" 
The waters of one Styx in the Aroanian mountains
In Greek mythology, Styx (/'st?ks/; Ancient Greek: Στ?ξ [stýk?s][citation needed]) is a deity and a river that forms the boundary between Earth and the Underworld, often called "Hades" which is also the name of its ruler. The rivers Styx, Phlegethon, Acheron, Lethe, and Cocytus supposedly all converge at the center of the underworld on a great marsh, which sometimes is also called the Styx. According to Herodotus, the river Styx originates near Feneos.[1] Styx is also a goddess with prehistoric roots in Greek mythology as a daughter of Tethys, after whom the river is named and because of whom it had miraculous powers.

7. Hades*: In Greek mythology, Hades was regarded as the oldest son of Cronus and Rhea, although the last son regurgitated by his father.[2] He and his brothers Zeus and Poseidon defeated their father's generation of gods, the Titans, and claimed rulership over the cosmos. Hades received the underworld, Zeus the sky, and Poseidon the sea, with the solid earth—long the province of Gaia—available to all three concurrently. Hades was often portrayed with his three-headed guard dog Cerberus.

The Etruscan god Aita and Roman gods Dis Pater and Orcus were eventually taken as equivalent to the Greek Hades and merged as Pluto, a Latinization of his euphemistic Greek name Plouton (Greek: Πλο?των Ploúton).[3]

Achilles, His Heart and Soul Were Mortal Part One- (Years Before Troy) Achilles* woke, his slain foes calling out his name hearing merciless woes, his sharpen sword they blame looking at the heavens he saw the moon glowing blood red sending its message of truth about his victims now dead! Rising from night bed, screams from those slain still ringing he knowing much more torment they would be bringing there was darkness in his soul that, nothing could ever tame his father* had made death and destruction his only game! Small was the solace that, mortal men praised his deeds how in fiercest battles he makes his victims bleed dispatching each to Charon* for that final dark boat trip on river Styx, to Hades pain hides in each thirsty sip! As pitiful dead faces come through bloody halls louder and louder heard are their dark cursing calls those words become deep stabbing daggers and his heart is pained he realizes, worthless value of great fame he has gained! Asking mother Thetis* why she gave this black curse sincerely proclaiming that, nothing could be worse To Peleus* his father, he in tears begins to speak begging for mercy and the love he forever there seeks! He not knowing, Fate had demanded his half-god birth destiny's reasons hidden, he pondered life's worth asking why could not Apollo*, his suffering now ease not seeing, even mighty gods can not do as they please As silence grew louder, his soul already hurt he saw dying faces falling on bloodstained dirt As voices and bloody shadows sank back into stone wall his heart and soul's in memory, stored every cursing call! Seeing now, last vestiges of heavenly lights Achilles took time to remember all his fights soon begging for dawn, its soothing lights his pained soul relieved away washed curses of those that had cause to be aggrieved. Rising to meet bright sun and dawn's glistening beams he felt its deep gifting warmth and Hope that redeems Fate and Destiny granted this warrior another day on this mortal plane, for now, his half-god body would stay. Robert J. Lindley, 8-04- 2018 Rhyme (Mythology, Great Tales) Syllables Per Line: 0 12 12 14 14 0 12 12 14 14 0 12 12 14 14 0 12 12 14 14 0 12 12 14 14 0 12 12 14 14 0 12 12 14 14 0 12 12 14 14 0 12 12 14 14 Total # Syllables:468 Total # Words: 340 See More Detailed Notes Listed Above- 1. Achilles*: - (Of Troy fame*) 2. (Achilles) father*: - Peleus 3.. (Achilles) mother*:- Thetis his mother, was the immortal Nereid Thetis, 4.Ares* : Ares is the Greek god of war. He is one of the Twelve Olympians, the son of Zeus and Hera. 5. Charon*: In Greek mythology, Charon or Kharon (/'k??r?n, -?n/; Greek ?????) is the ferryman of Hades who carries souls of the newly deceased across the rivers 6. Styx*": "River Styx" The waters of one Styx in the Aroanian mountains In Greek mythology, Styx (/'st?ks/; Ancient Greek: St?? [stýk?s][citation needed]) is a deity and a river that forms the boundary between Earth and the Underworld, often called "Hades" which is also the name of its ruler. The rivers Styx, Phlegethon, Acheron, Lethe, and Cocytus supposedly all converge at the center of the underworld on a great marsh, which sometimes is also called the Styx. 7. Hades*: In Greek mythology, Hades was regarded as the oldest son of Cronus and Rhea, Hades received the underworld, Zeus the sky, and Poseidon the sea, with the solid earth—long the province of Gaia—available to all three concurrently. Hades was often portrayed with his three-headed guard dog Cerberus. ** Modern interpretation Hades equals Hell..

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Date: 9/27/2019 7:37:00 PM
Beautifully penned, reiteration of this legeld. "dispatching each to Charon* for that final dark boat trip on river Styx, to Hades pain hides in each thirsty sip!" chilling lines, in light of the slaughter. Well done.
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Date: 9/27/2019 7:36:00 PM
Beautifully penned, reiteration of this legeld. "dispatching each to Charon* for that final dark boat trip on river Styx, to Hades pain hides in each thirsty sip!" chilling lines, in light of the slaughter. Well done.
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Date: 9/22/2019 3:37:00 PM
Your love for mythology and classic form is abundantly clear in your writing here, Robert. I prefer to see a personal poem about you and something from your life, but I admire your artistry with this form.
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Robert Lindley
Date: 9/22/2019 4:44:00 PM
Thank you my friend. I do write so often about my life that it is refreshing and often a relief to compose using imagination and my knowledge of literature to honor famous poets, legendary heroes and the like. Exception was in regards to this long poem- I set some very hard standards to meet! However, I did finally meet them..
Date: 9/22/2019 3:37:00 PM
you should give links to these parts of the series at your blog. I had to track it down but it was worth it!
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Robert Lindley
Date: 9/22/2019 4:41:00 PM
Thank you my friend. I did as you wisely suggested. Provided all three links to the complete poem. Great suggestion, one I had not even considered. Sometimes I set hard challenges for myself when composing. I guess it comes from attempting to stir myself to compose and attempt to solve a mathematical puzzle too.
Date: 8/23/2018 4:14:00 PM
Very creative prose, Robert! Love the opening thematic setting, which in turn, amplified the crescendo ending. Powerful poetry, an always per your pen talented imagination. Love and more love always.
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Robert Lindley
Date: 8/24/2018 6:49:00 AM
Thank you my good friend. Part two has been presented here but alas(due to unforeseen things recently), I have not truly stared part three yet.
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Freddie Robinson Jr.
Date: 8/23/2018 4:15:00 PM
Will read Pt. 2 soon, Lord willing. Love and peace, brother.
Date: 8/14/2018 2:05:00 AM
A brilliant verse on mythology Robert, enjoyed this. Tom
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Robert Lindley
Date: 8/24/2018 6:46:00 AM
Thank you my good friend. Always a pleasure to read your poetry as well as your comments..
Date: 8/13/2018 11:19:00 AM
Hi Robert, you bring mythology to life in this stunning poetic piece. I could read this work over and over, the deep emotion that paints itself on the canvas of the mind, This is exceptional work my friend. I have enjoyed this work so much Robert. this mythological gem, this work of art goes into my faves. Habve a wonderful monday. your friend always....Mike.
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Robert Lindley
Date: 8/24/2018 6:45:00 AM
Thank you my very good friend. Truly a light in this darkened world is your inspiring and very kind comment,RJL
Date: 8/9/2018 9:32:00 PM
Dear Robert, your brilliant poem is a mythological beauty.. your magnificent storytelling is wrapped in wondrous rhythm, rhymes and dynamic emotional imagery of his inner turmoil. I truly enjoyed your shining work of art my dear poetic friend. Epic, exquisite and ready for part two! A fav! Warmest wishes always.. ~Susan
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Robert Lindley
Date: 8/10/2018 8:22:00 AM
Thank you my dear friend, your words and support are always greatly appreciated as is your joining with me to do our past and current collaborations. Thanks for the fav.. I knew you would appreciate the history, mythological references and breadth of this creation.
Date: 8/5/2018 9:00:00 AM
I am fascinated by the depth and breadth of your writing, Robert. Only a renowned pen can write such an epic poem and make it flow with lovely rhymes. Much to learn here in your introductory remarks and footnotes. Excellent work as always..you always aim for perfection.
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Robert Lindley
Date: 8/5/2018 9:22:00 AM
Thank you my good friend. I appreciate your kind, generous comments and your own fine poetry! Greek mythology and especially Homer's epics, The Iliad and the Odyssey..
Date: 8/5/2018 3:44:00 AM
When I was fifteen we did 'Greeks And Trojans' as a setwork book. I was absolutley in love with that book. It was mostly about the warriors and their war, though, and any reference to the mythology was quite cursory. Your research is clearly very thorough, and your notes are fascinating. The poem is excellent. I detect an epic in the making, looking forward to part two.
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Robert Lindley
Date: 8/5/2018 7:41:00 AM
Back in the 60's we too studied the Trojan War and the Greek civilization my friend, as did you. I found all mythology to be a very fascinating subject.Especially Greek and Roman mythology. I haven't yet started part two and am not sure how many parts there will be, but likely there will be three or more if my muse leads that way.
Date: 8/5/2018 3:41:00 AM
An illuminating voyage to the world of mythology! A brilliant allegory of a spiritual journey, I would say.. Evil hearts, dark souls can "realize" their own "worthess value" and can claim "light, dawn" to soothe their "pained hearts".. Thank you so much dear Robert for sharing so beautiful, enlightening work of art written by a talented, insightful and great poet who masters his words and thoughts and who brings light to the readers world and mind.. A FAV! A great pleasure in reading! Blessed.
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Robert Lindley
Date: 8/5/2018 7:37:00 AM
Thank you my good friend. Mortals are born from sin. This savage world represents that reality my friend. Achilles was a great warrior, as warfare was far more common back then, as new nations and empires were rising and falling. Yet his fighting and killing was not the end all of him. In every heart rests hope and a light(be that light big or small). Thank you for the fav...