Get Your Premium Membership

Walt Whitman Short Poems

Famous Short Walt Whitman Poems. Short poetry by famous poet Walt Whitman. A collection of the all-time best Walt Whitman short poems


by Walt Whitman
 WOMEN sit, or move to and fro—some old, some young; 
The young are beautiful—but the old are more beautiful than the young.



by Walt Whitman
 A PROMISE to California, 
Also to the great Pastoral Plains, and for Oregon: 
Sojourning east a while longer, soon I travel toward you, to remain, to teach robust
 American
 love;

For I know very well that I and robust love belong among you, inland, and along the
 Western
 Sea; 
For These States tend inland, and toward the Western Sea—and I will also.

by Walt Whitman
 THROUGH the ample open door of the peaceful country barn, 
A sun-lit pasture field, with cattle and horses feeding; 
And haze, and vista, and the far horizon, fading away.

by Walt Whitman
 THIS is thy hour O Soul, thy free flight into the wordless, 
Away from books, away from art, the day erased, the lesson done, 
Thee fully forth emerging, silent, gazing, pondering the themes thou lovest best.
Night, sleep, and the stars.

by Walt Whitman
 NO labor-saving machine, 
Nor discovery have I made; 
Nor will I be able to leave behind me any wealthy bequest to found a hospital or library, 
Nor reminiscence of any deed of courage, for America, 
Nor literary success, nor intellect—nor book for the book-shelf;
Only a few carols, vibrating through the air, I leave, 
For comrades and lovers.

by Walt Whitman
 AS I watch’d the ploughman ploughing, 
Or the sower sowing in the fields—or the harvester harvesting, 
I saw there too, O life and death, your analogies: 
(Life, life is the tillage, and Death is the harvest according.
)

by Walt Whitman
 A GLIMPSE, through an interstice caught, 
Of a crowd of workmen and drivers in a bar-room, around the stove, late of a winter
 night—And I
 unremark’d seated in a corner; 
Of a youth who loves me, and whom I love, silently approaching, and seating himself near,
 that
 he
 may hold me by the hand; 
A long while, amid the noises of coming and going—of drinking and oath and smutty
 jest, 
There we two, content, happy in being together, speaking little, perhaps not a word.
5



by Walt Whitman
 OF Equality—As if it harm’d me, giving others the same chances and rights as
 myself—As if it were not indispensable to my own rights that others possess the
 same.

by Walt Whitman
 BATHED in war’s perfume—delicate flag! 
(Should the days needing armies, needing fleets, come again,) 
O to hear you call the sailors and the soldiers! flag like a beautiful woman! 
O to hear the tramp, tramp, of a million answering men! O the ships they arm with joy! 
O to see you leap and beckon from the tall masts of ships!
O to see you peering down on the sailors on the decks! 
Flag like the eyes of women.

by Walt Whitman
 I SEE in you the estuary that enlarges and spreads itself grandly as it pours in the great
 Sea.

by Walt Whitman
 ONLY themselves understand themselves, and the like of themselves, 
As Souls only understand Souls.

by Walt Whitman
 WHAT weeping face is that looking from the window? 
Why does it stream those sorrowful tears? 
Is it for some burial place, vast and dry? 
Is it to wet the soil of graves?

by Walt Whitman
 HOW they are provided for upon the earth, (appearing at intervals;) 
How dear and dreadful they are to the earth; 
How they inure to themselves as much as to any—What a paradox appears their age; 
How people respond to them, yet know them not; 
How there is something relentless in their fate, all times;
How all times mischoose the objects of their adulation and reward, 
And how the same inexorable price must still be paid for the same great purchase.

by Walt Whitman
 1
AS the time draws nigh, glooming, a cloud, 
A dread beyond, of I know not what, darkens me.
I shall go forth, I shall traverse The States awhile—but I cannot tell whither or how long; Perhaps soon, some day or night while I am singing, my voice will suddenly cease.
2 O book, O chants! must all then amount to but this? Must we barely arrive at this beginning of us?.
.
.
And yet it is enough, O soul! O soul! we have positively appear’d—that is enough.

by Walt Whitman
 I DREAM’D in a dream, I saw a city invincible to the attacks of the whole of the rest of
 the
 earth;

I dream’d that was the new City of Friends; 
Nothing was greater there than the quality of robust love—it led the rest; 
It was seen every hour in the actions of the men of that city, 
And in all their looks and words.
5

by Walt Whitman
 AS if a phantom caress’d me, 
I thought I was not alone, walking here by the shore; 
But the one I thought was with me, as now I walk by the shore—the one I loved, that
 caress’d me, 
As I lean and look through the glimmering light—that one has utterly
 disappear’d, 
And those appear that are hateful to me, and mock me.
5

by Walt Whitman
 A LEAF for hand in hand! 
You natural persons old and young! 
You on the Mississippi, and on all the branches and bayous of the Mississippi! 
You friendly boatmen and mechanics! You roughs! 
You twain! And all processions moving along the streets!
I wish to infuse myself among you till I see it common for you to walk hand in hand!

by Walt Whitman
 OF Justice—As if Justice could be anything but the same ample law, expounded by
 natural
 judges and saviors, 
As if it might be this thing or that thing, according to decisions.

by Walt Whitman
 AMONG the men and women, the multitude, 
I perceive one picking me out by secret and divine signs, 
Acknowledging none else—not parent, wife, husband, brother, child, any nearer than I
 am; 
Some are baffled—But that one is not—that one knows me.
Ah, lover and perfect equal! I meant that you should discover me so, by my faint indirections; And I, when I meet you, mean to discover you by the like in you.

by Walt Whitman
 RACE of veterans! Race of victors! 
Race of the soil, ready for conflict! race of the conquering march! 
(No more credulity’s race, abiding-temper’d race;) 
Race henceforth owning no law but the law of itself; 
Race of passion and the storm.
5

by Walt Whitman
 QUICKSAND years that whirl me I know not whither, 
Your schemes, politics, fail—lines give way—substances mock and elude me; 
Only the theme I sing, the great and strong-possess’d Soul, eludes not; 
One’s-self must never give way—that is the final substance—that out of all
 is
 sure; 
Out of politics, triumphs, battles, life—what at last finally remains?
When shows break up, what but One’s-Self is sure?

A Pact  Create an image from this poem
by Ezra Pound
 I make a pact with you, Walt Whitman-- 
I have detested you long enough.
I come to you as a grown child Who has had a pig-headed father; I am old enough now to make friends.
It was you that broke the new wood, Now is a time for carving.
We have one sap and one root-- Let there be commerce between us.

by Walt Whitman
 THE untold want, by life and land ne’er granted, 
Now, Voyager, sail thou forth, to seek and find.

by Walt Whitman
 ONE’S-SELF I sing—a simple, separate Person; 
Yet utter the word Democratic, the word En-masse.
Of Physiology from top to toe I sing; Not physiognomy alone, nor brain alone, is worthy for the muse—I say the Form complete is worthier far; The Female equally with the male I sing.
Of Life immense in passion, pulse, and power, Cheerful—for freest action form’d, under the laws divine, The Modern Man I sing.

To You  Create an image from this poem
by Walt Whitman
 STRANGER! if you, passing, meet me, and desire to speak to me, why should you
 not speak to me? 
And why should I not speak to you?