Short Poetry by Popular Famous Poets

 Poet
1 William Wordsworth
2 William Shakespeare
3 Oscar Wilde
4 Emily Dickinson
5 Maya Angelou
6 Rabindranath Tagore
7 Robert Frost
8 Langston Hughes
9 Walt Whitman
10 Shel Silverstein
11 William Blake
12 Sylvia Plath
13 Pablo Neruda
14 Alfred Lord Tennyson
15 William Butler Yeats
16 Rudyard Kipling
17 Tupac Shakur
18 Edward Estlin (E E) Cummings
19 Charles Bukowski
20 Muhammad Ali
21 Henry Wadsworth Longfellow
22 Sandra Cisneros
23 Sarojini Naidu
24 Alice Walker
25 Billy Collins
26 Christina Rossetti
27 Carol Ann Duffy
28 Edgar Allan Poe
29 John Donne
30 Ralph Waldo Emerson
31 Nikki Giovanni
32 Raymond Carver
33 John Keats
34 Ogden Nash
35 Lewis Carroll
36 Thomas Hardy
37 Mark Twain
38 Spike Milligan
39 Carl Sandburg
40 Anne Sexton
41 Alexander Pushkin
42 Percy Bysshe Shelley
43 Henry David Thoreau
44 Elizabeth Barrett Browning
45 Thunchaththu Ramanujan Ezhuthachan
46 Roger McGough
47 Sara Teasdale
48 Victor Hugo
49 George (Lord) Byron
50 Gary Soto

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Famous Short Change Poems

Famous Short Change Poems. Short Change Poetry by Famous Poets. A collection of the all-time best Change short poems

Other Short Poem Pages


Poems are below...


Change | Short Famous Poems and Poets

 
by Gabriela Mistral

Pine Forest

 Let us go now into the forest.
Trees will pass by your face, and I will stop and offer you to them, but they cannot bend down.
The night watches over its creatures, except for the pine trees that never change: the old wounded springs that spring blessed gum, eternal afternoons.
If they could, the trees would lift you and carry you from valley to valley, and you would pass from arm to arm, a child running from father to father.


by Emily Dickinson

The look of thee what is it like

 The look of thee, what is it like
Hast thou a hand or Foot
Or Mansion of Identity
And what is thy Pursuit?

Thy fellows are they realms or Themes
Hast thou Delight or Fear
Or Longing -- and is that for us
Or values more severe?

Let change transfuse all other Traits
Enact all other Blame
But deign this least certificate --
That thou shalt be the same.


by Robert Frost

Dust of Snow

 The way a crow
Shook down on me
The dust of snow
From a hemlock tree
Has given my heart
A change of mood
And saved some part
Of a day I had rued.


by Sara Teasdale

The Mystery

 Your eyes drink of me,
Love makes them shine,
Your eyes that lean
So close to mine.
We have long been lovers, We know the range Of each other's moods And how they change; But when we look At each other so Then we feel How little we know; The spirit eludes us, Timid and free— Can I ever know you Or you know me?


by William Shakespeare

Fairy Land v

 FULL fathom five thy father lies; 
Of his bones are coral made; 
Those are pearls that were his eyes: 
 Nothing of him that doth fade, 
But doth suffer a sea-change 
Into something rich and strange.
Sea-nymphs hourly ring his knell: Ding-dong.
Hark! now I hear them-- Ding-dong, bell!


by Ron Padgett

Ladies And Gentlemen In Outer Space

 Here is my philosophy:
Everything changes (the word "everything"
has just changed as the
word "change" has: it now
means "no change") so
quickly that it literally surpasses my belief,
charges right past it
like some of the giant
ideas in this area.
I had no beginning and I shall have no end: the beam of light stretches out before and behind and I cook the vegetables for a few minutes only, the fewer the better.
Butter and serve.
Here is my philosophy: butter and serve.


by Ben Jonson

On Gut


CXVIII.
 ? ON GUT.
  
GUT eats all day and letchers all the night,
   So all his meat he tasteth over twice ;
And striving so to double his delight,
   He makes himself a thorough-fare of vice.
Thus, in his belly, can he change a sin,
Lust it comes out, that gluttony went in.



by Sara Teasdale

Like Barley Bending

 Like barley bending
In low fields by the sea,
Singing in hard wind
Ceaselessly;

Like barley bending
And rising again,
So would I, unbroken,
Rise from pain;

So would I softly,
Day long, night long,
Change my sorrow
Into song.


by Christina Rossetti

De Profundis

 Oh why is heaven built so far,
 Oh why is earth set so remote?
I cannot reach the nearest star
 That hangs afloat.
I would not care to reach the moon, One round monotonous of change; Yet even she repeats her tune Beyond my range.
I never watch the scatter'd fire Of stars, or sun's far-trailing train, But all my heart is one desire, And all in vain: For I am bound with fleshly bands, Joy, beauty, lie beyond my scope; I strain my heart, I stretch my hands, And catch at hope.


by Sara Teasdale

It Will Not Change

 It will not change now
After so many years;
Life has not broken it
With parting or tears;
Death will not alter it,
It will live on
In all my songs for you
When I am gone.


by Wang Wei

A Song of an Autumn Night

 Under the crescent moon a light autumn dew 
Has chilled the robe she will not change -- 
And she touches a silver lute all night, 
Afraid to go back to her empty room.


by Robert Frost

Sand Dunes

 Sea waves are green and wet,
But up from where they die,
Rise others vaster yet,
And those are brown and dry.
They are the sea made land To come at the fisher town, And bury in solid sand The men she could not drown.
She may know cove and cape, But she does not know mankind If by any change of shape, She hopes to cut off mind.
Men left her a ship to sink: They can leave her a hut as well; And be but more free to think For the one more cast-off shell.


by Sylvia Plath

Full Fathom Five

 Full fathom five thy father lies; 
Of his bones are coral made; 
Those are pearls that were his eyes: 
Nothing of him that doth fade 
But doth suffer a sea-change 
Into something rich and strange.
Sea-nymphs hourly ring his knell: Ding-dong.
Hark! now I hear them,--ding-dong, bell.


by William Morris

Summer

 Summer looked for long am I:
Much shall change or e'er I die.
Prithee take it not amiss Though I weary thee with bliss.


by Emily Dickinson

The murmuring of Bees has ceased

 The murmuring of Bees, has ceased
But murmuring of some
Posterior, prophetic,
Has simultaneous come.
The lower metres of the Year When Nature's laugh is done The Revelations of the Book Whose Genesis was June.
Appropriate Creatures to her change The Typic Mother sends As Accent fades to interval With separating Friends Till what we speculate, has been And thoughts we will not show More intimate with us become Than Persons, that we know.


by Emily Dickinson

Me change! Me alter!

 Me, change! Me, alter!
Then I will, when on the Everlasting Hill
A Smaller Purple grows --
At sunset, or a lesser glow
Flickers upon Cordillera --
At Day's superior close!


by Victor Hugo

The Grave and The Rose

 The Grave said to the Rose, 
"What of the dews of dawn, 
Love's flower, what end is theirs?" 
"And what of spirits flown, 
The souls whereon doth close 
The tomb's mouth unawares?" 
The Rose said to the Grave.
The Rose said, "In the shade From the dawn's tears is made A perfume faint and strange, Amber and honey sweet.
" "And all the spirits fleet Do suffer a sky-change, More strangely than the dew, To God's own angels new," The Grave said to the Rose.


by Amy Levy

Impotens

 If I were a woman of old,
What prayers I would pray for you, dear;
My pitiful tribute behold--
Not a prayer, but a tear.
The pitiless order of things, Whose laws we may change not nor break, Alone I could face it--it wrings My heart for your sake.


by Constantine P Cavafy

Understanding

 The years of my youth, my sensual life --
how clearly I see their meaning now.
What needless repentances, how futile.
.
.
.
But I did not understand the meaning then.
In the dissolute life of my youth the desires of my poetry were being formed, the scope of my art was being plotted.
This is why my repentances were never stable.
And my resolutions to control myself, to change lasted for two weeks at the very most.


by Emily Dickinson

To the bright east she flies

 To the bright east she flies,
Brothers of Paradise
Remit her home,
Without a change of wings,
Or Love's convenient things,
Enticed to come.
Fashioning what she is, Fathoming what she was, We deem we dream -- And that dissolves the days Through which existence strays Homeless at home.


by Ernest Dowson

Growth

 I watched the glory of her childhood change,
Half-sorrowful to find the child I knew,
 (Loved long ago in lily-time),
Become a maid, mysterious and strange,
With fair, pure eyes - dear eyes, but not the eyes I knew
 Of old, in the olden time!

Till on my doubting soul the ancient good
Of her dear childhood in the new disguise
 Dawned, and I hastened to adore
The glory of her waking maidenhead,
And found the old tenderness within her deepening eyes,
 But kinder than before.


by Emily Dickinson

Im the little Hearts Ease!

 I'm the little "Heart's Ease"!
I don't care for pouting skies!
If the Butterfly delay
Can I, therefore, stay away?

If the Coward Bumble Bee
In his chimney corner stay,
I, must resoluter be!
Who'll apologize for me?

Dear, Old fashioned, little flower!
Eden is old fashioned, too!
Birds are antiquated fellows!
Heaven does not change her blue.
Nor will I, the little Heart's Ease -- Ever be induced to do!


by Ellis Parker Butler

A Question

 Whene’er I feed the barnyard folk
 My gentle soul is vexed;
My sensibilities are torn
 And I am sore perplexed.
The rooster so politely stands While waiting for his food, But when I feed him, what a change! He then is rough and rude.
He crowds his gentle wives aside Or pecks them on the head; Sometimes I think it would be best If he were never fed.
And so I often stand for hours Deciding which is right— To impolitely have enough, Or starve and be polite.


by Howard Nemerov

The Beautiful Lawn Sprinkler

 What gives it power makes it change its mind
At each extreme, and lean its rising rain
Down low, first one and then the other way;
In which exchange humility and pride
Reverse, forgive, arise, and die again,
Wherefore it holds at both ends of the day
The rainbow in its scattering grains of spray.


by William Blake

To The Accuser Who is The God of This World

 Truly My Satan thou art but a Dunce
And dost not know the Garment from the Man
Every Harlot was a Virgin once
Nor canst thou ever change Kate into Nan

Tho thou art Worship'd by the Names Divine 
Of Jesus & Jehovah thou art still
The Son of Morn in weary Nights decline
The lost Travellers Dream under the Hill







...