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Best Famous William Blake Poems

Here is a collection of the all-time best famous William Blake poems. This is a select list of the best famous William Blake poetry. Reading, writing, and enjoying famous William Blake poetry (as well as classical and contemporary poems) is a great past time. These top poems are the best examples of william blake poems.

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Written by William Butler Yeats | Create an image from this poem

An Acre Of Grass

 Picture and book remain,
An acre of green grass
For air and exercise,
Now strength of body goes;
Midnight, an old house
Where nothing stirs but a mouse.
My temptation is quiet.
Here at life's end Neither loose imagination, Nor the mill of the mind Consuming its rag and bonc, Can make the truth known.
Grant me an old man's frenzy, Myself must I remake Till I am Timon and Lear Or that William Blake Who beat upon the wall Till Truth obeyed his call; A mind Michael Angelo knew That can pierce the clouds, Or inspired by frenzy Shake the dead in their shrouds; Forgotten else by mankind, An old man's eagle mind.


Written by Richard Wilbur | Create an image from this poem

For K.R. on her Sixtieth Birthday

 Blow out the candles of your cake.
They will not leave you in the dark, Who round with grace this dusky arc Of the grand tour which souls must take.
You who have sounded William Blake, And the still pool, to Plato's mark, Blow out the candles of your cake.
They will not leave you in the dark.
Yet, for your friends' benighted sake, Detain your upward-flying spark; Get us that wish, though like the lark You whet your wings till dawn shall break: Blow out the candles of your cake.
Written by Andrew Barton Paterson | Create an image from this poem

The All Right Un

 He came from "further out", 
That land of fear and drought 
And dust and gravel.
He got a touch of sun, And rested at the run Until his cure was done, And he could travel.
When spring had decked the plain, He flitted off again As flit the swallows.
And from that western land, When many months were spanned, A letter came to hand, Which read as follows: "Dear Sir, I take my pen In hopes that all their men And you are hearty.
You think that I've forgot Your kindness, Mr Scott; Oh, no, dear sir, I'm not That sort of party.
"You sometimes bet, I know.
Well, now you'll have a show The 'books' to frighten.
Up here at Wingadee Young Billy Fife and me We're training Strife, and he Is a all right un.
"Just now we're running byes, But, sir, first time he tries I'll send you word of.
And running 'on the crook' Their measures we have took; It is the deadest hook You ever heard of.
"So when we lets him go, Why then I'll let you know, And you can have a show To put a mite on.
Now, sir, my leave I'll take, Yours truly, William Blake, P.
S.
-- Make no mistake, He's a all right un.
By next week's Riverine I saw my friend had been A bit too cunning.
I read: "The racehorse Strife And jockey William Fife Disqualified for life -- Suspicious running.
" But though they spoilt his game I reckon all the same I fairly ought to claim My friend a white un.
For though he wasn't straight, His deeds would indicate His heart at any rate Was "a all right un".
Written by William Blake | Create an image from this poem

When Klopstock England Defied

 When Klopstock England defied,
Uprose William Blake in his pride;
For old Nobodaddy aloft
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and belch'd and cough'd; Then swore a great oath that made Heaven quake, And call'd aloud to English Blake.
Blake was giving his body ease, At Lambeth beneath the poplar trees.
From his seat then started he And turn'd him round three times three.
The moon at that sight blush'd scarlet red, The stars threw down their cups and fled, And all the devils that were in hell, Answer?d with a ninefold yell.
Klopstock felt the intripled turn, And all his bowels began to churn, And his bowels turn'd round three times three, And lock'd in his soul with a ninefold key; .
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Then again old Nobodaddy swore He ne'er had seen such a thing before, Since Noah was shut in the ark, Since Eve first chose her hellfire spark, Since 'twas the fashion to go naked, Since the old Anything was created .
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