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Best Famous Play Ball Poems

Here is a collection of the all-time best famous Play Ball poems. This is a select list of the best famous Play Ball poetry. Reading, writing, and enjoying famous Play Ball poetry (as well as classical and contemporary poems) is a great past time. These top poems are the best examples of play ball poems.

Search and read the best famous Play Ball poems, articles about Play Ball poems, poetry blogs, or anything else Play Ball poem related using the PoetrySoup search engine at the top of the page.

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Written by Robert Pinsky | Create an image from this poem

The Night Game

 Some of us believe
We would have conceived romantic
Love out of our own passions
With no precedents,
Without songs and poetry--
Or have invented poetry and music
As a comb of cells for the honey.
Shaped by ignorance, A succession of new worlds, Congruities improvised by Immigrants or children.
I once thought most people were Italian, Jewish or Colored.
To be white and called Something like Ed Ford Seemed aristocratic, A rare distinction.
Possibly I believed only gentiles And blonds could be left-handed.
Already famous After one year in the majors, Whitey Ford was drafted by the Army To play ball in the flannels Of the Signal Corps, stationed In Long Branch, New Jersey.
A night game, the silver potion Of the lights, his pink skin Shining like a burn.
Never a player I liked or hated: a Yankee, A mere success.
But white the chalked-off lines In the grass, white and green The immaculate uniform, And white the unpigmented Halo of his hair When he shifted his cap: So ordinary and distinct, So close up, that I felt As if I could have made him up, Imagined him as I imagined The ball, a scintilla High in the black backdrop Of the sky.
Tight red stitches.
Rawlings.
The bleached Horsehide white: the color Of nothing.
Color of the past And of the future, of the movie screen At rest and of blank paper.
"I could have.
" The mind.
The black Backdrop, the white Fly picked out by the towering Lights.
A few years later On a blanket in the grass By the same river A girl and I came into Being together To the faint muttering Of unthinkable Troubadours and radios.
The emerald Theater, the night.
Another time, I devised a left-hander Even more gifted Than Whitey Ford: A Dodger.
People were amazed by him.
Once, when he was young, He refused to pitch on Yom Kippur.


Written by Les Murray | Create an image from this poem

On Home Beaches

 Back, in my fifties, fatter that I was then,
I step on the sand, belch down slight horror to walk
a wincing pit edge, waiting for the pistol shot
laughter.
Long greening waves cash themselves, foam change sliding into Ocean's pocket.
She turns: ridicule looks down, strappy, with faces averted, or is glare and families.
The great hawk of the beach is outstretched, point to point, quivering and hunting.
Cars are the stuff at its back.
You peer, at this age, but it's still there, ridicule, the pistol that kills women, that gets them killed, crippling men on the towel-spattered sand.
Equality is dressed, neatly, with mouth still shut.
Bared body is not equal ever.
Some are smiled to each other.
Many surf, swim, play ball: like that red boy, holding his wet T shirt off his breasts.
Written by Ambrose Bierce | Create an image from this poem

Decalogue

 Thou shalt no God but me adore:
'Twere too expensive to have more.
No images nor idols make For Roger Ingersoll to break.
Take not God's name in vain: select A time when it will have effect.
Work not on Sabbath days at all, But go to see the teams play ball.
Honor thy parents.
That creates For life insurance lower rates.
Kill not, abet not those who kill; Thou shalt not pay thy butcher's bill.
Kiss not thy neighbor's wife, unless Thine own thy neighbor doth caress.
Don't steal; thou'lt never thus compete Successfully in business.
Cheat.
Bear not false witness--that is low-- But "hear 'tis rumored so and so.
" Covet thou naught that thou hast got By hook or crook, or somehow, got.