Best Famous Explorer Poems

Here is a collection of the all-time best famous Explorer poems. This is a select list of the best famous Explorer poetry. Reading, writing, and enjoying famous Explorer poetry (as well as classical and contemporary poems) is a great past time. These top poems are the best examples of explorer poems.

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Written by Joseph Brodsky | Create an image from this poem

A Polar Explorer

All the huskies are eaten.
There is no space left in the diary And the beads of quick words scatter over his spouse's sepia-shaded face adding the date in question like a mole to her lovely cheek.
Next the snapshot of his sister.
He doesn't spare his kin: what's been reached is the highest possible latitude! And like the silk stocking of a burlesque half-nude queen it climbs up his thigh: gangrene.
Written by Rudyard Kipling | Create an image from this poem

The Explorer

 There's no sense in going further -- it's the edge of cultivation,"
 So they said, and I believed it -- broke my land and sowed my crop --
Built my barns and strung my fences in the little border station
 Tucked away below the foothills where the trails run out and stop.
Till a voice, as bad as Conscience, rang interminable changes On one everlasting Whisper day and night repeated -- so: "Something hidden.
Go and find it.
Go and look behind the Ranges -- "Something lost behind the Ranges.
Lost in wating for you.
Go!" So I went, worn out of patience; never told my nearest neighbours -- Stole away with pack and ponies -- left 'em drinking in the town; And the faith that moveth mountains didn't seem to help my labours As I faced the sheer main-ranges, whipping up and leading down.
March by march I puzzled through 'em, turning flanks and dodging shoulders, Hurried on in hope of water, headed back for lack of grass; Till I camped above the tree-line -- drifted snow and naked boulders -- Felt free air astir to windward -- knew I'd stumbled on the Pass.
'Thought to name it for the finder: but that night the Norther found me -- Froze and killed the plains-bred ponies; so I called the camp Despair (It's the Railway Gap to-day, though).
Then my Whisper waked to hound me: -- "Something lost behind the Ranges.
Over yonder! Go you there!" Then I knew, the while I doubted -- knew His Hand was certain o'er me.
Still -- it might be self-delusion -- scores of better men had died -- I could reach the township living, but.
.
.
He knows what terror tore me .
.
.
But I didn't .
.
.
but I didn't.
I went down the other side, Till the snow ran out in flowers, and the flowers turned to aloes, And the aloes sprung to thickets and a brimming stream ran by; But the thickets dwined to thorn-scrub, and the water drained to shallows, And I dropped again on desert -- blasterd earth, and blasting sky.
.
.
.
I remember lighting fires; I remember sitting by 'em; I remember seeing faces, hearing voices, through the smoke; I remember they were fancy -- for I threw a stone to try 'em.
"Something lost behind the Ranges" was the only word they spoke.
But at last the country altered -- White Man's country past disputing -- Rolling grass and open timber, with a hint of hills behind -- There I found me food and water, and I lay a week recruiting.
Got my strength and lost my nightmares.
Then I entered on my find.
Thence I ran my first rough survey -- chose my trees and blazed and ringed 'em -- Week by week I pried and smhampled -- week by week my findings grew.
Saul he went to look for donkeys, and by God he found a kingdom! But by God, who sent His Whisper, I had struck the worth of two! Up along the hostile mountains, where the hair-poised snowslide shivers -- Down and through the big fat marshes that the virgin ore-bed stains, Till I heard the mile-wide mutterings of unimagined rivers, And beyond the nameless timber saw illimitable plains! 'Plotted sites of future cities, traced the easy grades between 'em; Watched unharnessed rapids wasting fifty thousand head an hour; Counted leagues of water-frontage through the axe-ripe woods that screen 'em -- Saw the plant to feed a people -- up and waiting for the power! Well, I know who'll take the credit -- all the clever chaps that followed -- Came, a dozen men together -- never knew my desert-fears; Tracked me by the camps I'd quitted, used the water-holes I hollowed.
They'll go back and do the talking.
They'll be called the Pioneers! They will find my sites of townships -- not the cities that I set there.
They will rediscover rivers -- not my rivers heard at night.
By my own old marks and bearings they will show me how to get there, By the lonely cairns I builded they will guide my feet aright.
Have I named one single river? Have I claimed one single acre? Have I kept one single nugget -- (barring samples)? No, not I! Because my price was paid me ten times over by my Maker.
But you wouldn't understand it.
You go up and occupy.
Ores you'll find there; wood and cattle; water-transit sure and steady (That should keep the railway rates down), coal and iron at your doors.
God took care to hide that country till He judged His people ready, Then He chose me for His Whisper, and I've found it, and it's yours! Yes, your "Never-never country" -- yes, your "edge of cultivation" And "no sense in going further" -- till I crossed the range to see.
God forgive me! No, I didn't.
It's God's present to our nation.
Anybody might have found it but -- His Whisper came to Me!
Written by David Herbert Lawrence | Create an image from this poem

Dreams Old

 I have opened the window to warm my hands on the sill
Where the sunlight soaks in the stone: the afternoon 
Is full of dreams, my love, the boys are all still 
In a wistful dream of Lorna Doone.
The clink of the shunting engines is sharp and fine, Like savage music striking far off, and there On the great, uplifted blue palace, lights stir and shine Where the glass is domed in the blue, soft air.
There lies the world, my darling, full of wonder and wistfulness and strange Recognition and greetings of half-acquaint things, as I greet the cloud Of blue palace aloft there, among misty indefinite dreams that range At the back of my life’s horizon, where the dreamings of past lives crowd.
Over the nearness of Norwood Hill, through the mellow veil Of the afternoon glows to me the old romance of David and Dora, With the old, sweet, soothing tears, and laughter that shakes the sail Of the ship of the soul over seas where dreamed dreams lure the unoceaned explorer.
All the bygone, hush?d years Streaming back where the mist distils Into forgetfulness: soft-sailing waters where fears No longer shake, where the silk sail fills With an unfelt breeze that ebbs over the seas, where the storm Of living has passed, on and on Through the coloured iridescence that swims in the warm Wake of the tumult now spent and gone, Drifts my boat, wistfully lapsing after The mists of vanishing tears and the echo of laughter.
Written by Vachel Lindsay | Create an image from this poem

Popcorn Glass Balls and Cranberries

 I.
THE LION The Lion is a kingly beast.
He likes a Hindu for a feast.
And if no Hindu he can get, The lion-family is upset.
He cuffs his wife and bites her ears Till she is nearly moved to tears.
Then some explorer finds the den And all is family peace again.
II.
AN EXPLANATION OF THE GRASSHOPPER The Grasshopper, the grasshopper, I will explain to you:— He is the Brownies' racehorse, The fairies' Kangaroo.
III.
THE DANGEROUS LITTLE BOY FAIRIES In fairyland the little boys Would rather fight than eat their meals.
They like to chase a gauze-winged fly And catch and beat him till he squeals.
Sometimes they come to sleeping men Armed with the deadly red-rose thorn, And those that feel its fearful wound Repent the day that they were born.
IV.
THE MOUSE THAT GNAWED THE OAK-TREE DOWN The mouse that gnawed the oak-tree down Began his task in early life.
He kept so busy with his teeth He had no time to take a wife.
He gnawed and gnawed through sun and rain When the ambitious fit was on, Then rested in the sawdust till A month of idleness had gone.
He did not move about to hunt The coteries of mousie-men.
He was a snail-paced, stupid thing Until he cared to gnaw again.
The mouse that gnawed the oak-tree down, When that tough foe was at his feet — Found in the stump no angel-cake Nor buttered bread, nor cheese, nor meat — The forest-roof let in the sky.
"This light is worth the work," said he.
"I'll make this ancient swamp more light," And started on another tree.
V.
PARVENU Where does Cinderella sleep? By far-off day-dream river.
A secret place her burning Prince Decks, while his heart-strings quiver.
Homesick for our cinder world, Her low-born shoulders shiver; She longs for sleep in cinders curled — We, for the day-dream river.
VI.
THE SPIDER AND THE GHOST OF THE FLY Once I loved a spider When I was born a fly, A velvet-footed spider With a gown of rainbow-dye.
She ate my wings and gloated.
She bound me with a hair.
She drove me to her parlor Above her winding stair.
To educate young spiders She took me all apart.
My ghost came back to haunt her.
I saw her eat my heart.
VII.
CRICKETS ON A STRIKE The foolish queen of fairyland From her milk-white throne in a lily-bell, Gave command to her cricket-band To play for her when the dew-drops fell.
But the cold dew spoiled their instruments And they play for the foolish queen no more.
Instead those sturdy malcontents Play sharps and flats in my kitchen floor.
Written by Vachel Lindsay | Create an image from this poem

The Lion

 The Lion is a kingly beast.
He likes a Hindu for a feast.
And if no Hindu he can get, The lion-family is upset.
He cuffs his wife and bites her ears Till she is nearly moved to tears.
Then some explorer finds the den And all is family peace again.
Written by William Topaz McGonagall | Create an image from this poem

A Tribute to Henry M. Stanley

 Welcome, thrice welcome, to the city of Dundee,
The great African explorer Henry M Stanley,
Who went out to Africa its wild regions to explore,
And travelled o'er wild and lonely deserts, fatigued and footsore.
And what he and his little band suffered will never be forgot, Especially one in particular, Major Edmund Barttelot, Alas! the brave heroic Officer by a savage was shot, The commandant of the rear column - O hard has been his lot! O think of the noble Stanley and his gallant little band, While travelling through gloomy forests and devastated land, And suffering from all kinds of hardships under a burning sun! But the brave hero has been successful and the victory's won.
While in Africa he saw many wonderful sights, And was engaged, no doubt, in many savage fights, But the wise Creator was with him all along And now he's home again to us, I hope quite strong.
And during his travels in Africa he made strange discoveries, He discovered a dwarfish race of people called pigmies, Who are said to be the original natives of Africa, And when Stanley discovered them he was struck with awe.
One event in particular is most worthy to relate, How God preserved him from a very cruel fate: He and his Officers were attacked, while sailing their boat, By the savages of Bumbireh, all eager to cut his throat.
They seized him by the hair and tugged it without fear, While one of his men received a poke in the ribs with a spear; But Stanley, having presence of mind, instantly contrives To cry to his men, Shove off the boat, and save your lives! Then savages swarmed into three canoes very close by, And every bow was drawn, while they savagely did cry; But thee heroic Stanley quickly shot two of them dead, Then the savages were baffled and immediately fled.
This incident is startling, but nevertheless true, And in midst of all dangers the Lord brought him through Then, welcome him,.
thrice welcome him, right cheerfully, Shouting, Long live the great African explorer, Henry M Stanley! Therefore throw open the gates of the city of Dundee, And receive him with loud cheers, three time three, And sound your trumpets and beat your drums, And play up, See the Conquering Hero Comes!
Written by Anne Sexton | Create an image from this poem

The Fury Of Gods Goodbye

 One day He 
tipped His top hat 
and walked 
out of the room, 
ending the argument.
He stomped off saying: I don't give guarantees.
I was left quite alone using up the darkness I rolled up my sweater, up in a ball, and took it to bed with me, a kind of stand-in for God, that washerwoman who walks out when you're clean but not ironed.
When I woke up the sweater had turned to bricks of gold.
I'd won the world but like a forsaken explorer, I'd lost my map.
Written by Anne Sexton | Create an image from this poem

The Fury Of Gods Good-bye

 One day He
tipped His top hat
and walked
out of the room,
ending the arguement.
He stomped off saying: I don't give guarentees.
I was left quite alone using up the darkenss.
I rolled up my sweater, up into a ball, and took it to bed with me, a kind of stand-in for God, what washerwoman who walks out when you're clean but not ironed.
When I woke up the sweater had turned to bricks of gold.
I'd won the world but like a forsaken explorer, I'd lost my map.