Get Your Premium Membership

Best Famous Analogy Poems

Here is a collection of the all-time best famous Analogy poems. This is a select list of the best famous Analogy poetry. Reading, writing, and enjoying famous Analogy poetry (as well as classical and contemporary poems) is a great past time. These top poems are the best examples of analogy poems.

Search for the best famous Analogy poems, articles about Analogy poems, poetry blogs, or anything else Analogy poem related using the PoetrySoup search engine at the top of the page.

See Also:

Poems are below...



Written by Vernon Scannell | Create an image from this poem

Lesson In Grammar

 THE SENTENCE

Perhaps I can make it plain by analogy.
Imagine a machine, not yet assembled, Each part being quite necessary To the functioning of the whole: if the job is fumbled And a vital piece mislaid The machine is quite valueless, The workers will not be paid.
It is just the same when constructing a sentence But here we must be very careful And lay stress on the extreme importance Of defining our terms: nothing is as simple As it seems at first regard.
"Sentence" might well mean to you The amorous rope or twelve years" hard.
No, by "sentence" we mean, quite simply, words Put together like the parts of a machine.
Now remember we must have a verb: verbs Are words of action like Murder, Love, or Sin.
But these might be nouns, depending On how you use them – Already the plot is thickening.
Except when the mood is imperative; that is to say A command is given like Pray, Repent, or Forgive (Dear me, these lessons get gloomier every day) Except, as I was saying, when the mood is gloomy – I mean imperative We need nouns, or else of course Pronouns; words like Maid, Man, Wedding or Divorce.
A sentence must make sense.
Sometimes I believe Our lives are ungrammatical.
I guess that some of you Have misplaced the direct object: the longer I live The less certain I feel of anything I do.
But now I begin To digress.
Write down these simple sentences:-- I am sentenced: I love: I murder: I sin.
Written by Edgar Lee Masters | Create an image from this poem

Seth Compton

When I died, the circulating library
Which I built up for Spoon River,
And managed for the good of inquiring minds,
Was sold at auction on the public square,
As if to destroy the last vestige
Of my memory and influence.
For those of you who could not see the virtue Of knowing Volney's "Ruins" as well as Butler's "Analogy" And "Faust" as well as "Evangeline," Were really the power in the village, And often you asked me, "What is the use of knowing the evil in the world?" I am out of your way now, Spoon River, Choose your own good and call it good.
For I could never make you see That no one knows what is good Who knows not what is evil; And no one knows what is true Who knows not what is false.
Written by Edwin Arlington Robinson | Create an image from this poem

Lost Anchors

 Like a dry fish flung inland far from shore, 
There lived a sailor, warped and ocean-browned, 
Who told of an old vessel, harbor-drowned, 
And out of mind a century before, 
Where divers, on descending to explore 
A legend that had lived its way around 
The world of ships, in the dark hulk had found 
Anchors, which had been seized and seen no more.
Improving a dry leiure to invest Their misadventure with a manifest Analogy that he may read who runs, The sailor made it old as ocean grass-- Telling of much that once had come to pass With him, whose mother should have had no sons.