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The Hard Road - 1 of 3

by
Pure wine costs, for the golden cup,

ten thousand coppers a flagon,

And a jade plate of dainty food calls for million coins.
I fling aside my chop-sticks and cup, I cannot eat nor drink.
.
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I pull out my dagger, I peer four ways in vain.
I would cross the Yellow River, but ice chokes the ferry; I would climb the Tai-hang Mountains, but the sky is blind with snow.
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I would sit and poise a fishing-pole, lazy by a brook -- But I suddenly dream of riding a boat, sailing for the sun.
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Journeying is hard, Journeying is hard.
There are many turings -- Which am I to follow?.
.
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I will mount a long wind some day and break the heavy waves And set my cloudy sail straight and bridge the deep, deep sea.

Poem by Li Bai
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