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Ballade of Unfortunate Mammals

by
 Love is sharper than stones or sticks;
Lone as the sea, and deeper blue;
Loud in the night as a clock that ticks;
Longer-lived than the Wandering Jew.
Show me a love was done and through, Tell me a kiss escaped its debt! Son, to your death you'll pay your due- Women and elephants never forget.
Ever a man, alas, would mix, Ever a man, heigh-ho, must woo; So he's left in the world-old fix, Thus is furthered the sale of rue.
Son, your chances are thin and few- Won't you ponder, before you're set? Shoot if you must, but hold in view Women and elephants never forget.
Down from Caesar past Joynson-Hicks Echoes the warning, ever new: Though they're trained to amusing tricks, Gentler, they, than the pigeon's coo, Careful, son, of the curs'ed two- Either one is a dangerous pet; Natural history proves it true- Women and elephants never forget.
L'ENVOI Prince, a precept I'd leave for you, Coined in Eden, existing yet: Skirt the parlor, and shun the zoo- Women and elephants never forget.

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