Footle Definition

A footle is a 2 line, 2 syllable trochaiac monometer poem with an integral title suitable for light, witty, pertinent, topical verse.


A footle is a type of poem that is actually very short. It is a two-line poem that consists of two syllables in each line. It is generally written to be light and witty. It is one of the most simple and yet most difficult poetry types. Simple for it is only two lines and two syllables, but difficult because with those two lines and syllables the author must make enough impact and create an entertaining enough poem that it can be memorable and enjoyed by the readers.

The use of footle poetry is to express a thought or finalize a point in a way that is captivating, but not overpowering. A footle poem is actually a trochaic monometer, which means it is a poem written in a foot, which is only two syllables. The goal of the trochaic monometer is simplicity and a footle poem is the definition of simplicity. 

Footle Poem Example

Brian Strand, UK Experimental Verse ~ Footle* Acers warm glow fall show Go Slow heigh-ho furlough Bonnie & Clyde too snide both died

Top 5 Footle Poem Examples

PMPoem TitlePoetFormCategories
Premium Member Poem AND THEN I KISSED HIM - COLLABORATION WITH TIM SMITH ALLISON, JAN Footlehumorous, , cute,
Premium Member Poem BEACH FOOTLES COLLABORATION ALLISON, JAN Footlebeach, humorous,
More Foolish Footles for Super Soupy Soupers - Ryerson, Tim Footlefunny, me,
Premium Member Poem FUNERAL FOOTLES ALLISON, JAN Footlefuneral, humor, sad,
Premium Member Poem Fussy Cat Haight, Sandra Footlecat, humor,

Other Footle Definition

[v] act foolishly, as by talking nonsense
[v] be about; "The high school students like to loiter in the Central Square"; "Who is this man that is hanging around the department?"


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See Also...

act, be, behave, do, lurch, prowl

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